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April 17, 1992 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1992-04-17

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The Michigan Daily- Friday, April 17,1992 - Page 3

Homeless
erect 'tent qr
Cit in
va lot
by Tovah Calderon

'U' study reveals
health insurance
hard to acquire

Homeless activists spent their
second night camping out in a
vacant lot downtown last night to
protest the county commissioners'
refusal to provide more affordable
housing.
Members of the Homeless
Union and Homeless Action
Committee (H AC) said they are
trying to make people aware of the
problems facing Ann Arbor's
estimated homeless population of
1,500.
"County commissioners are
silent in the midst of people's
misery. We can't afford to remain
silent," said group member Robert
Cams.
The lot, located on the corner of
North Main and Ann, has been
named "Salvation City in the Poor
People's Park" by recent homeless
occupants.
The group, which requested use
of the land for 30 days, was
originally denied a permit by the
county because it was unable to
deposit $1 million for liability
insurance.
The permit was finally issued to
the demonstrators when they
accused the county of stifling their
rights of free speech and assembly.
"We're spiritually rich but finan-
cially poor and that's why we're

KEN Ni SMULLEWtUaiiy
Homeless activists erected this "Poor People's Park" on the corner of Main and Ann streets earlier this week.

homeless to begin with," Carris
said. "County commissioners go to
their homes at night and turn up the.
heat. We're here to turn up the heat
on them."
The park, which used to be a lot
that housed the Salvation Army, is
now county-owned property that
has been vacant for three years.
Homeless Union and HAC
members chose this lot to use for
demonstration because it is
symbolically located near two
buildings they would like to see
used as low-income housing for the
homeless, Carris said.
Carris explained the Ann Arbor
Inn, a state-owned vacated hotel,
could provide housing for 189
people and the former Downtown
Club, which is now vacant and

owned by the county, used to
provide low-income housing to 68
people.
Residents of the Downtown
Club were evicted in 1983 in order
to use the building as offices for the
Department of Human Services,
Carris said.
"It's ironic that folks were
evicted so the county could give of-
fice space to social service
providers whose mission is to meet
the needs of the homeless," he said.
"I saw it as a move by govern-
ment officials to get rid of poor
people," said former Downtown
Club resident and HAC member
David Noel.
Homeless Union member Will
Campbell said he hopes their
presence will eventually lead to

access to these buildings. "We're an
army of people who are hopeful in
gaining homeward stability. We are
pregnant; we are expecting the Ann
Arbor Inn and Downtown Club," he
explained.
Carris said the city claims that
the real issue is a question of
funding, "but the city just spent $4
million to improve sidewalks."
"If they can spend $4 million on
concrete, why can't they spend at
least the samedamount on human
beings?" he said.
About 24 homeless people, in-
cluding two pregnant women and
one 17-year-old teenager, began
their 30-day stay at the park
Wednesday night.

by Joshua Meckler
Daily Staff Reporter
For many University students,
health care insurance is a distant
worry. Students with a medical or
health problem can get treatment at
University Health Services with little
concern about the cost.
But for those outside the
University community - especially
those who work in small businesses
of one to 20 employees - finding
health insurance may be a difficult
task.
"I never go to a doctor for any-
thing unless I'm totally ill because
you have to pay for all this your-
self," said Dawn Stader, a hair stylist
at Upper Cut hair salon in Ann
Arbor.
Stader said she cannot afford
health insurance and the salon's
owner has found it difficult to find
an insurer willing to cover a business
of Upper Cut's size - 10 employ-
ees.
According to a recent University
study, Stader's situation is a rela-
tively common one. The study, titled
"Small-Business Health Insurance:
Only The Healthy Need Apply,"
surveyed 45 insurance companies
and found:
Insurance companies some-
times refuse to cover "high-risk"
small businesses such as hair salons
and bars and taverns; and,
Small businesses could be de-
nied insurance coverage because an
employee had a "preexisting condi-

tion" such as AIDS or heart disease.
The study, which was published
in the spring issue of Health Affairs,
said "... hair salons were described
to us a 'triple threat' - high em-
ployee turnover ... a high proportion
of women of child-bearing age, and
a high proportion of homosexual
men."
Bars and taverns, the study said,
were perceived by insurers as having
"high employee turnover and haz-
ardous or unhealthy working condi-
tions."
Catherine McLaughlin, an asso-
ciate professor in the School of
Public Health and the principal in-
vestigator on the project, said the
difficulties faced by small businesses
in finding health insurance have
caused them to turn to the govern-
ment for help.
McLaughlin said insurance legis-
lation is currently pending in
Washington, D.C., which proposes
eliminating preexisting condition
exclusion practices and offering sub-
sidies to businesses that provide in-
surance for their employees.
"If the objective is to in fact
eliminate financial barriers to health
care, then I don't think private
insurance based insurance is going
to work - without very heavy
subsidies from the government.
Insurance companies are not to
blame for small businesses' prob-
lems, McLaughlin said. "It's not that
insurance companies are bad people.
They're just doing business."

FDA limits breast implant
restrictions to clinical use

W RITE FOR TI E DAI LY
WRITE FOR SPORTS WRI'TE FOR
NEWS WRITE FOR AALS WRITE
FOR OPIONON W RITE FOR 'II 1iE
MICHIGAN 1DAILY
76-4-0552

1

WASHINGTON (AP) - Many
women who want to enlarge their
breasts with silicone gel implants
won't be able to get them, under a
0 government policy announced yes-
terday that will allow implants for
women with breast cancer.
The Food and Drug Admin-
istration's new policy will allow use
of the implants only through
controlled clinical studies designed
to answer safety questions, including
the health effects of implant leakage
andrupture.
Ak - "The central aim of FDA's deci-

sion is to significantly limit the use
of silicone gel breast implants while
vigorously pursuing the necessary
research about their safety," FDA
Commissioner David Kessler told
reporters.
He said he was "highly con-
scious" that some women who have
lost a breast to cancer or traumatic
injury or who have a breast defor-
mity need implants.
Kessler's announcement lifts a
moratonum on use of the implants in
effect since Jan. 6.

99 0
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copying
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Come Study with us at UAA!I
We offer courses in the following areas:
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Correction
The University Grounds Waste and Management Department is solely
responsible for the residence hall move-out recycling program. The city of
Ann Arbor is responsible for a similar program for fraternity and soroity
houses and co-operatives. This information was incorrectly reported in
yesterday's Daily.
,THE LIST
What's happening in Ann Arbor today

r

Meetings
Friday
U of M Chess Club, weekly mtg,
Michigan League, 1 p.m.
AIESEC Dominick's 8:00 p.m.
Passover Seders & Meals,
reservation required 1429 Hill st,
Hillel
The Ann Arbor Film Co-op,
film Project A, Aud A Angell Hall,
7:30 p.m. and 9:15 p.m.
Saturday
Passover Seders & Meals, res
req, 1429 Hill, Hillel
Monty Python and the Holy
Grail, 8 & 10 p.m. Aud 3, MLB
Tasa meeting/workshop, 1209
Mich Union, 1-2 p.m.
Speakers

nighttime team walking service. Sun-
Thur 8 p.m.-11:30 p.m. Stop by 2333
Bursley or call 763-WALK.
ECB Peer Writing Tutors, An-
gell/Mason Hall Computing Center,
7-11 p.m.
U of M Bridge Club, weekly
duplicate bridge game, Michigan
Union, Tap Rm, 7:15 p.m.
U of M Ninjitsu Club, practice,
I-M Bldg, wrestling rm, 6:30-8 p.m.
Michigan Ultima Team, prac-
tice, 9:30 p.m.
U-M Taekwondo Club. workout.
1200 CCRB, 6-8 p.m. Beginners wel-
come.
U-M Shorin-Ryu Karate-Do
Club, practice. CCRB Martial Arts
Rm, 6-7 p.m.
Undergraduate Psychology
Department, Undergraduate psy-
chology advising, walk-in or ap-
pointment, K-108 West Quad, 9 a.m-4
p.m.
ECB Peer Writing Tutors. 219
UGLi, 1-5 p.m.
Monfort Residents, Please attend
the first annual Arb-fard and meeting
at Angelo's. For more phone 943-
8068
Saturday
Guild House Campus Ministry,
playing percussion and learning
rhythms. 8-10 p.m.
Faculty Women's Club, Square
Dance Section, First United
Methodist Church

Religious
Services
AVTAVAsVAVA
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(A campus ministry of the
Christian Reformed Church)
1236 Washtenaw Ct. " 668-74211662-2404
Rev. Don Postema, Pastor
SUNDAYWRSHIPr
Joyful Easter Prayers-10a.m.
Meditative Prayers-6 p.m.
WEDNESDAYS
Undergrad Group-Join us for conversation,
fun, refreshments-9-10 p.m.
CANTERBURY HOUSE
(The Chaplaincy of the Episcopal Church
of the U-M Community)
218 N. Division St. * 665-0606
SATURDAY:
Great vigil of Easter at
Canterbury House-11 p.m.
Eucharist, followed by Easter Feast at
Canterbury House. All welcome-5 p.m.
The Rev. Dr. Virginia Peacock, Chaplain
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
(Between Hill & South University)
SUNDAYS:
Worship-9:30 & 11 a.m.
Campus Faith Exploration Discussion
Bagels & coffee served-9:30 a.m.
THURSDAYS:
Campus Worship & Dinner-5:30 p.m.
For information, call 662-4466
Amy Morrison, Campus Pastor
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN CHURCH, ELCA
801 South Forest (at Hill Street), 668-7622
SUNDAY: Worship-10 a.m.
WEDNESDAY: Bible Study-6 p.m.
Evening Prayer-7 p.m.
ST. MARY'SSTUDENT PARISH
(A Roman Catholic Parish at U-M)
331 Thompson Street
SAL: Weekend Liturgies-5 p.m., and
SU.:-8:30 a.m.,10 a.m.,12 noon,
5 p.m., and 7 p.m.
ERL: Confessions-4-5 p.m.

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---

University of M&icAa= Off=ceof !Vevefopmen
M7viciganTeud
a W oi lei to MO t h efofocal prop = =itt rs for ti ir p tM in t &
nivsity of (icAig= =e$3.5mi[V=on in wwemi uiRunt. iciig=n ?r "exists
to hAdp keep 'U of M ranked among the 6.st schools in the fand

"Synthesis
in Carbon
Activity,"
noon

Friday
of Metal Clusters
and their Catalytic
1706 Chem, 12:00

Am .abor 1stww
210$S. Yifthi Ave.
Vasiy Mart
Lib" ,yStreet
120 Z. Libecrtyj
Uhjiks Books,=g
549 Z. Vniverstiy

Saturday
"Jeremy Rusling/Jeremy
Steinkober," The Drum Circle,
Guild House, 8-10 p.m.
"Made in Korea: The social
Implication of International
Adoptions in the. United
States," Mi Ok Bruining, Anderson
Rm, Michigan Union 1:00 p.m.
Furthermore
Friday
Safewalk, night-time safety walk-
ing service. Sun-Thurs 8 p.m.-1:30
a.m., Fri-Sat, 8 p.m.-11:30 p.m. Stop
by 102 UGLi or call 936-1000. Also,

Casty's Tavam
304- Depot
De Long's scabaeue
314 Detro it
3idjigw Boob'.
And S ypif
317 S. State
VUce6 .Frnes
Chiaago's r Conui's
2165S. Fourthi Ave.

Cortmar Ceaners
17sco t eot
300 S. State
603 Z. Liberty
Washtai= Vairy
602 S Ashlfey

Wherehw0se 1Ecovd5
1140 S. 'Universiyty
71iatd you for your support

Sunday
M Ballroom Dance Club,

U of

i

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