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January 08, 1992 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1992-01-08

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The Michigan Daily- Wednesday, January 8, 1992 - Page 7

Yugoslav military
shoots downEC

Shortage of tests results in cheating,
chaos, all A's at Anthro 101 hourly

ohelicopter
MADJAREVO, Yugoslavia
(AP) - The Serb-dominated
Yugoslav military shot down a
European Community helicopter
yesterday, killing five truce ob-
servers in an attack that threatened
to shatter the country's fragile
pe"e.
Hours after the incident, the
' Yugoslav Defense Ministry took
responsibility, described the shoot-
ing in Croatia as tragic and promised
to investigate and punish "the cul-
prits," according to a statement car-
ried by the Tanjug news agency.
The federal presidency suspended
the air force commander, Col. Gen.
Zvonko Jurjevic, pending the
investigation.
The EC helicopter, painted white
and clearly marked as belonging to
the EC, blew up in the air after it
was hit by an air-to-air missile over
Novi Marof. All five soldiers
aboard - a French citizen and four
Italians - were killed.
A second EC helicopter made an
emergency landing and the Defense
Ministry said it had been damaged,

kiling 5
although reporters who saw it on
the ground could detect no damage.
Italy said the two craft, with the
EC flag painted on them, were
Italian army choppers.
Italy's deputy foreign minister,
Claudio Vitalone, told the Italian
Senate that the attack was a
"criminal aggression against neu-
tral observers, an aggression that
represents a premeditated act of
sabotage against the latest efforts in
the search for peace."
The U.N. Security Council met
in closed-door session last evening
to discuss the shooting and the dis-
patch of an advance U.N. observer
team to Croatia.
U.N. Secretary-General Boutros
Boutros-Ghali said yesterday's at-
tack demonstrated the need to press
ahead with peace efforts.
The two helicopters were on
their way from Belgrade, the federal
and Serbian capital, to Zagreb, the
Croatian capital, via Hungarian ter-
ritory to avoid conflict regions.
"I saw two army planes ... flying
high overhead," said Vlado Milak,

This helicopter was shot down by Yugoslav Federal Army troops
yesterday over Novi Marof village. All five people aboard the craft died.

by Rob Patton
Daily Staff Reporter
When TAs accidentally failed to
print about 100 exams for an
Anthropology 101 hourly on Dec.
11 in MLB 3, the ensuing chaos re-
sulted in shared exams, widespread
cheating, students taking tests in
stairwells, and, in the end, everyone
receiving an A on the test.
"It was a circus," Anthro 101
TA Melissa Johnson said. "It was
the most ridiculous thing I've ever
seen."
Those present said the fiasco be-
gan when TAs handed out the ex-
ams, and found they were short by
about 100. They told students with-
out exams to return at noon, when
the test was scheduled to end.
But some students who received
a test left anyway, leaving with
copies and compromising the in-
tegrity of the test.
"There was a lot of cheating ... it
just didn't occur to us that this
would happen," Johnson said.
When the students returned, they
were sent to the Dennison Building
to take the test, because another
class was scheduled to use the MLB
auditorium. But when students
arrived at Dennison, there was again
a shortage of tests. The TAs had
printed up enough new tests for the

number of students who had ac-
tually not received a test, but had
not accounted for those who had
left with exams. Students were
asked to share exams, resulting in
further confusion.
. By the time the students began
the examination, it was almost
12:30. But the test was meant to
take 50 minutes, and at 1 p.m. an-
other class began filing into the
room. Students were sent into the
stairwells to finish the test.
By this time students were fed
up. "We're sitting in the stairwells,
people are trying to walk around us
... it was frustrating," LSA first-
year student Johanna Paas said.
In the end, all students were
given an A on the test. But students
were left wondering how such an
error occurred.
"What essentially happened is
there was a glitch in an instruction
given to a computer," said Anthro
101 professor Conrad Kottak, who
was not present at the exam.
"And the TAs did not make a
count of the exams," Kottak said,
"Apparently the box they received
containing the exams seemed to have
the right number."
Kottak said he will take steps to
make sure such a mistake does not
occur in the future.

postal chief in Madjarevo, a town
two miles from Novi Marof.
"I then saw the two helicopters.
Then, one plane dropped from a
great height and fired four rockets,
one after another. The fourth hit,"
he said. "I saw an explosion, flames,
and then smoke. Then it dropped."
The attack came on the fourth
day of a generally successful U.N.-
brokered cease-fire in the 6-month-
old Serb-Croat war, in which Serb
militants and the federal army are
fighting Croatia over its June 25 in-
dependence declaration.
It could indicate that elements
of the federal army oppose the truce,

as do some Serb militants in
Croatia. Field forces in the civil war
often seem to be outside any com-
mander's control.
The attack also could have been
an attempt by military hard-liners
to embarrass Defense Minister
Veljko Kadijevic, who apologized
last month for Serb-led attack on
the Adriatic port of Dubrovnik that
he said was carried out without
permission of higher officials.
Serbia has been upset with the
EC's decision to recognize as inde-
pendent countries Croatia and other
Yugoslav republics that meet hu-
man rights criteria.

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. Learn how to Write Effective Essays
. Develop Comprehensive Exam Strategies
Classes start:
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EXCEL 996-1500
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ROOMMATES
ANN ARBOR - SHARE A HOME.
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Must see. 741-9021, women only.
COMPUTERS
COMPAQ 286 DESKPRO.VGA, 40 meg.,
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NEC Multispeed. Laptop, backlit, $799.
Toshiba laptop with modemn, HD, $1099.
Warranty, dos, bonus printer included.
313/662-0148 or 313/801-6484, 24 hrs.
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MEDITATION COURSE: 5 00 Thurs.
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Experience Not Necessary.
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Clinic Begins: Wednesday January 8
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CALL 763-3562 FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Date:
Time:
Place:

January 12, 1992
6:00-8:00 p.m.
Michigan Union
(Kuenzel Room)

FREE TRAVEL, CASH, AND EXCEL-
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successful SPRING BREAK tours. Call Inter-
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HOUSECLEANING FOR PROF'S
FAMILY. Baths, kitchen, beds, laundry,
0 vacuum. Any morning hrs. Need car, $6/hr.
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NCC WAITSTAFF WANTED. Catering
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Test Preparation 996-1500
Write it. Read it.
Recycle it!
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CELEBRATING 200 YEARS
THE BILL OF RlIGHTS
It's Good For Your Constitution

The Taskforce on the Bicentennial Celebration
wants to publicly thank the following for their support:

Office of Affirmative Action
School of Dentistry
College of Engineering
School of Information and Library Studies
Law School
College of Literature, Science, and the Arts
Medical School
School of Nursing

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