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April 06, 1992 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1992-04-06

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Page 8-The Michigan Daily- Monday, April 6, 1992

SERVE Week kicks off,
campus groups take part
by Nicole Malenfant usually do." Sponsored by Students Work
Daily Staff Reporter Bastress expressed concern that Against Todav's Huner (SW

ing
AT

Students will have a chance to
get involved with 20 community
service projects this week as Project
SERVE honors student volunteers
with its third annual SERVE Week,
which began yesterday.
The service projects will be con-
ducted by 12 different campus
groups, not all of which are service-
oriented.
"It's neat that it's not just com-
munity service groups that are in-
volved," Project SERVE Director
Anita Bohn said. "We also have
groups such as the Hindu Student
Council and the Minority Nurses
Student Association, and other
groups who aren't traditionally in-
volved in community service."
Bohn said SERVE Week is an
attempt to focus the attention of the
campus on volunteer work for one
week.
She said this objective would be
accomplished in three ways: by di-
rect service actions, fundraising and
recognition of those students already
involved in volunteer work.
Jen Bastress, Internal vice-chair
of the Project SERVE board, said
SERVE Week is a great way to uti-
lize the service network on campus.
"It's a time when all the service
groups on campus can come to-
gether, and that's not something they

many students and faculty do not re-
alize the amount of service work
students are actually doing on cam-
pus.
"You hear so many negative
things about college students, but
there are a lot of amazing things go-
ing on in the Ann Arbor-Ypsilanti
area that we should really be proud
of," she said.
The week started with a clean-up
yesterday of Adult Senior Services,

g * JtWJ 1 ay a .A.5glza ko Vt £ *
Hunger), all proceeds will go to area
hunger organizations.
The second annual "Rubber
Duck Hot Tub Raffle," sponsored by
University Students Against Cancer,
will actually bring a whirlpool onto
the Diag to promote a raffle for one
night's use of a hot tub, with profits
going to the American Cancer Soci-
ety.
Project SERVE acts all year
round as a referral service for stu-

'It's neat that it's not just community service
groups that are involved.' - Anita Bohn
Project SERVE Director

Ronald McDonald House and Ann
Arbor Shelter Association. The ser-
vice fraternity Alpha Phi Omega
will sponsor a clean-up each day of
SERVE Week.
The Silver Wings Society will
also sponsor a clean-up of the Huron
river on Saturday.
Bohn said volunteers were able
to pull "a tremendous amount of
junk" out of the river last year, in-
cluding a few shopping carts.
Other projects include a canned
food drive on Thursday and Friday,
and a "Taste of UM," where people
can buy tickets in the fishbowl to
sample foods from area restaurants.

dents interested in community ser-
vice and volunteer work, and also
sponsors annual events such as
SERVE Week to pay tribute to those
students.
Project SERVE is sponsoring a
recognition reception at the Union
on Tuesday for any students in-
volved with service work of any
kind, regardless of whether or not
they participated in SERVE Week,
Bohn said.
Bohn said she expects between
800-1000 people to participate in the
activities this year and hopes that
many more will get involved.

DOUG KANTER/Daily
A noisy crowd cheers at a packed Scorekeepers after a fourth-period shot in the Final Four game Saturday night

SOUTH U
Continued from page 1
the detail commander.
Both the police and the Univer-
sity community made preparations
throughout the day for Saturday
night. Police advised shop owners
to stop selling alcohol two hours
before the game, and they took
down the traffic light at the inter-
section of South University and

Church Street early in the afternoon
to prevent injury in the event that
people started hanging from the
wires.
The University arranged several
viewing areas to provide students
with an alternative to fraternity
parties and bars, but few actually
used them.
While 150 people showed up to
cheer on the Wolverines at the Uni-
versity Club in the Union, which
had room for 300, only a handful of

students took advantage of the ac-
commodations in the Tennis and
Track Building. This facility was
set up to hold 1,000.
"I'd like it better if there were
more people here, said University
student Patrick Lee at the Tennis
and Track Building. "Maybe it's
just too far away."
Police said they will be prepared
to handle crowds again Monday
night following a Michigan victory
over Duke.

0

Yeltsin attempts to secure his power

DEPARTMENT OFPSYCHOLOGY PEER ADVISING PROGRAM
OFFERS THE FOLLOWING FOCUS GROUPS
APPLYING TO GRADUATE SCHOOL IN PSYCHOLOGY:
Choosing Schools, Finding Recommenders, and Taking Tests
Monday, April 6,4:00-5:30 pm
Ostefin Room, West Quad, 541 Thompson Street
Writing a Personal Statement, Interviewing or Visiting Schools, Possibilities for Financial Support
Monday, April 13,4:00 - 5:30 pm
Ostefin Room, West Quad, 541 Thompson Street
The Life of a Psychology Graduate Student: Work, Life, and Time to Relax
Monday, April 20,4:00 - 5:30 pm
Ostefin Room, West Quad, 541 Thompson Street
For further information, call: 764-2580, K-106 WEST QUAD
University of Michigan
B Men's Glee Club
Jerry Blackstone, Director
132nd Annual Spring Concert
with Bob McGrath of Sesame Street
and the 1967 Around-the-World Glee Club

through increased economic reforms
MOSCOW (AP) - President demanding that Yeltsin relinquish the bloc included a majority of
Boris Yeltsin said yesterday he will some powers and ease the hardship lawmakers, but that could not be

fight efforts in Russia's parliament
to trim his powers and will use his
full authority to press ahead with
painful economic reforms.
"Only one way can exist today -
the continuation of radical reforms,"
he told a gathering of supporters.
His comments came on the eve of
a crucial session of the Congress of
People's Deputies that will debate a
new constitution to replace the
political system left by the
Communists. Parliament leaders are

caused by his market reforms.
Barely four months after
presiding over the death of the
Soviet Union, Yeltsin could face a
political firestorm during the session
of the 1,048-member body, which
convenes today in the Grand
Kremlin Palace.
But a key. Yeltsin aide, State
Secretary Gennady Burbulis, said
pro-reform groups agreed tentatively
yesterday to form a parliamentary
bloc to defend the presidenit. He said

confirmed independently.
In return, Yeltsin agreed to
consult with the bloc in making
government appointments and
formulating policy. That is the
closest he has come to joining a
political organization since quitting
the Communist Party in 1990.
Acknowledging criticism from
lawmakers, Yeltsin said he would
continue to shuffle his Cabinet and
to make "partial corrections" in his
reforms, which sent prices soaring.

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FAST, FREE DELIVERY
1952 South Industrial
553-3333s

Sat. April 11, 1992 8PM

- Hill Auditorium

Tickets: $8, $6, $5, $3 Student " Available at Hill Auditorium Box Office 764-8350
For Credit Card Orders call 763-TKTS

DON'T MISS SORORITY FALL RUSH!
Sorori y Fall Formal Pushwi// be Ear/y this year:
Sepember 7Th - 23rd, 1992
So regisfer ear/y orn:
T7esday April7Th and Wednesday, Apri 8Th
10 am - 5 pm Pondoom Michigan (nion
$20.00
For more in4ormatiov) call The Office of Greek Life a 663-1505
Let the Rush Begin!
CCRB Margaret Bell Pool Users
For the safety of our patrons, Bell Pool will be CLOSED from April 1&-
June 14, 1992 due to construction. Major renovations will include construction of
classrooms for use by the Division of Kinesiology. Once the initial stages are
complete, the pool can safely be reopened.
Consult the Spring/Summer drop-in schedule for regular pool hours at
NCRB and the IMSB. The following additional morning pool hours have been
made available at the IMSB (closed pool periods are also noted below).

0

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* filfill distribution and departmental requirements in introductory, advanced, and preprofessional courses
enhance career skills (in courses on architectural graphics, computer programming, filmwriting, MIDI
music production, and consumer psychology)
M immerse yourself in a foreign language (from Arabic to Yiddish)
pursue your interests in courses on classical mythology, African art, Chinese autobiography,
Shakespeare, World War II, Nietzsche, the New Testament, or many others.
FIRST SESSION: MAY 26-JULY 2. SECOND SESSION: JULY 6-AUGUST 14.
For more information about summer courses and special programs, please call (212) 854-5123 or return the
coupon below.

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April 20-April 24
April 27-May 1
May 6-May 17

Mon.-Fri.
Mon.-Fri.
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