100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 30, 1992 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1992-03-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 2-The Michigan Daily- Monday, March 30, 1992

I

CLINTON
Continued from page 1
marijuana in their youth. Other can-
didates denied ever trying the drug.
Those questions arose in late
1987 when Douglas Ginsburg with-
drew his Supreme Court nomination
after disclosing he had smoked mari-
juana with his students at Harvard
University.
The disclosures had little impact
on the campaign, but it marked the
first time the presidential race in-
cluded people of the generation that
grew up with recreational drug use.
Later, in an interview with CBS's
"Up to the Minute" program, Clinton
said he made the disclosure because
"no one had ever asked me the direct
question before...and I really do be-
lieve that public people really do
have a right to some privacy."
Asked if he knew he was break-
ing English law when he smoked
marijuana, Clinton said, "I assumed
it was against the law, but when we
got there they told us that as long as
we did it inside our apartments or
whatever nobody would hassle
us...but I was not into that."
Clinton's acknowledgment yes-
terday morning was the only drama
in an hour-long forum in which the
Democratic rivals traded fresh at-
tacks over Brown's proposed flat tax
and Clinton's support of capital
punishment.
ELECTION
Continued from page 1
grievances regarding campus police.
Two-hundred students will be
manning poll sites and counting bal-
lots during the election.
Carrie Pittman, MSA election di-
rector, said about 14 percent of the
student body voted in last winter's
election and she is expecting a simi-
lar turn-out this year. Ten-thousand
ballots have been printed for the
election.
Past election directors have had
problems getting people to staff
some polling sites and have experi-
enced some last-minute absences at
other sites. Pittman said these situa-
tions should not occur in this elec-
tion because two people have been
assigned to each site.
"As far as how it's going - re-
ally, really well," Pittman said. "It
will run smoothly from my end, I
think."
Poll site workers will verify that
all voters are students as the ballots
come in. The ballots will be tallied
on Tuesday, and official results
should be available April 1.

MO.LLY.SI ...V.ilyPAUL AY ..LO Dily
University students celebrate the basketball team's 75-71 victory over Ohio State yesterday. A jubilant crowd of
2,000 students poured on to South University Avenue after the game.

CELEBRATE
Continued from page 1
the flow of traffic.
The crowd then ran through the
Diag, onto the steps of the Graduate
Library and back South University
where the police were stationed.
"The police are being very rea-
sonable," LSA sophomore Brian
Gunn said. "Shit, it's not like they
didn't watch the game too."
One student, LSA sophomore
Joe Durrance, said he came outside
hoping to find a riot. "I missed the
big one in '89," he said.

Ann Arbor voting wards
An n94
0
Wa s h i n gto n
E. L ibe rty~
Hilla
p G e d d e s
M ad~iso
H iI I s
C
M ap is n o t s E
O ~a
Map is not to scale Erin Einhom/DAILY GRAPHIs

"I just think its a great thing for
the school to get together as a
union," LSA junior Anthony

squad wins its semi-final round.
Around 400 students gathered
Friday night after the regional final

'I just think its a great thing for the school
to get together as a union. It's a great thrill
to be in the Final Four.'
- Anthony Weinert
LSA junior

Weinert said. "It's a great thrill to
be in the Final Four."
Police said they will be ready
for a possibly more violent riot
Saturday night if the Michigan

game against Oklahoma State.

- Daily
Shepardson
story.

Staff Writer David
contributed to this

Calvin and Hobbes

Yous NAVA N p.. W HAT44N
QuC Wko, ASURNCE Do
CALO~A ? I NAVE ~THAT
FOR TE21 ST
o00
0 00

AM I EM RGTHt-E 5.WLS
I'L-N9 To EFFQCIVE
COMPETE IN A. TOVGN, G\.OW-.
ECcoNW ? I W~ANT ~ A\GWA
F P m b8 AWN I GET OUT
OF I:!I WATO(:R WUN\TY !
NA

IN TWNT CN~SE, {OQRG MAX
L SUGET "(O'V START~\
GET OUT OF S(\CUM EPS
ON N PVYA k)~T \No W.

by Bill Watterson
FOnT TT.
\IM

COUNCIL
Continued from page 1
With more communication and
more people working together on
finding solutions, "some of these
other issues will begin to fall away,
" King said.
One example he cited was the
tension between students and their
neighbors.
King said, based on experience
he gained as dean of students at the
college of Wooster in Ohio, he
thought the city could help facilitate
better relations.
"I think the city ought to be
working very carefully with stu-
dents and the dean of students to
begin to get a thoughtful resolution
to some of this," he said. "I don't
think there needs to be this kind of
tension."
"As the dean of students (at
Wooster) that's what I always did
.. work with students and give;
them a chance because I think most
students are very responsible."
Hunter agreed with King and
said students could display their re-
sponsibility by voting and getting
involved with city issues.
"More students, and not just the,
Greeks, should come down and get
involved," Hunter said. "As far as
I'm concerned, students have just as
many rights and responsibilities as
any other citizen in Ann Arbor."
The council established a noisy
party task force last year which
Hunter said was designed to ad-
dress complaints placed by busi-
nesses and non-student residents,
but Hunter said, "When you have a
noisy party task force you assume
there are noisy parties."
This assumption is the problem,
PROTEST
Continued from page 1
that the Holocaust is used as a
sensational tool when there is almost
no similarity between what is hap-
pening in Israel and what happened
in Europe during World War II."
Demonstrators also addressed the
Middle East peace process.
Demonstrator Khaled Sbeih said,
"We think this peace process is a
game to give Israel more time to
take more land and build more set-
tlements."
LSA senior Lisa Eilar said ex-
tremism would not create a lasting
peace. "Saying Israel should not ex-
ist is wrong ... The peace process
should start today. Let's move for-
ward ... Israel exists but so does
Palestine ... Let's work for peace

Hunter said, but he said he feels the
council has handled matters ap-
propriately.
Hunter said the attacks levied
against the present council by
Republican and Libertarian candi-
dates during their campaigns have
been out of line. He called them
"political smokescreens designed to
get elected."
The council's 8-3 Democratic
majority has been criticized harshly
for politicizing issues and for a lack
of responsibility toward the voters.
"The council is doing some
things it shouldn't be doing," King
said. "And some of the things they
are doing, they aren't doing right."
But Hunter, who was once a mi-
nority member on a 8-3 Republican
majority council, said, "It does not
have to be partisan."
"To say that there are not differ-
ences between Democrats and
Republicans is like saying there's
'More students, and
not just the Greeks,
should come down and
get involved.'
- Larry Hunter
City Council member
no difference between night and
day, but on many projects I've been
able to work on a bi-partisan level."
King said he thinks the council
should play a role more like a board
of directors.
"I think the council needs to
work at the policy level," he said.
"The council ought to be creating
the relationship, it could be helpful
by way of guidelines or advice but
certainly council should not be in-
volved in any of the administration
of justice," he said.
today," Eilar said.
"Everyone has the right to exist
regardless of internal affairs," said
RC first-year student Phillip Rossi.
"I think Israel should have the right
'Israel exists but so
does Palestine ... Let's
work for peace today.'
-- Lisa Eilar

I1

U

join our Staff
Write for the
Michigan Daily
Sports, Opinion, News, Arts & Photo
Call 764-0552 for more info

r
3

MIDNIGHT SALE TONIGHT!
12:01 AM TILL 1 AM

__U

to exist there too ... I think Israel
could moderate its position a bit and
the Arabs could too."
Engineering sophomore Phil
Wills said he was impressed with the
pictures carried by the protesters.
"They bring to life what's really
happening. The pictures seem to
show that they're upset about what's
been happening in Palestine all these
years," he said.

The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) Is published Monday through Friday during the Fall and Winter terms by
students at the University of Michigan. On-campus subscription rate for fall/winter 91-92 Is $30; all other
subscriptions via first class U.S. mail, winter semester only, are $80. Subscriptions must be prepaid.
The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and the Associated Collegiate Press.
ADDRESS: The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1327.
PHONE NUMBERS (All area code 313): News 764-0552; Opinion 747-2814; Arts 763-0379; Sports 747-3336;
Circulation 764-0558; Classified advertising 764-0557; Display advertising 764-0554; Billing 764-0550.

t v..c a

,.
f Y

..............
.................
::::
!iii>:
W.a... .. ..r

ALSO, NEW CDs FROM
DEF LEPPARDN BODY COUNT
1 099 each or less

NEWS Henry Goldblatt, Managi4g Editor
EDITORS: David Rhangold, Bethany Robertson, Stefanie Yves, Kenneth Waker
STAFF: Laura Adderley, tan Baragr, Hop. Calad, Bary Cohen, Ben Dec, Lauren Deomer, Edn Einhom, Rent. Hudde Loreta Lee,
Andrew Levy, RobinLitwin, Nicole Malenfarit, Sarah McCarthy, TravisMMReynolds, Josh Mocider, Shelay Morismon, Meleew
Poeiee", Karen Pier, Mona Oureahi, Karen Sabgir, Christopher Scherer. Gwen Shaffer, Purvi Shah, Jemnifr SlIveuborg. Alan Suser.
Karen Talaskci, David Wartowedd, Chastity Wilson.
OPINON Yel Citro, Geoffrey Ear, Amitava Mazumdar, Editors
STAFF:Mat Ader, Jenny Alix, Renee Bushey, Daren Hubbard, David Leher, Ad Rotenberg, Dave Rowe, David Shepardeon, Steve
Smnar, Daniel Stewart
SPORTS John Mlyo, Managin Editor
EDITORS: .Josh Duow, A/bo.rt Lin..Jeff Wiliams
STAFF: Meg Bloon, Andy DeKort., Kimberly DeSempelare, Mathew Dodge, Shawn DuFreen., Jeri Durmt, Brol Forest.Jim Foss,.
Ryan Herington, Mike Hil, Bruoar ncio, Dan Lnia, Rod Loewenthal, Sharon Ludy, Adam Mier, RiMilvaleky. Bermadet
Ramsey. bike Rndlio, Tim Rardin, Greg Rliardson, Chad Safran, Todd Schoernraue, .Jeff Shaean, Tim Spolar. Andy Slabi., Ken
Sugiura, Benson Taylor.
ARTS Elizabeth Lienlrd, Michael John Wilon, Editora
EDITORS: Mark Bnell (Fhin), Diane Fdeden (Rn. & Perfoning Arts), Alan J. Hogg, ,k (Books), Ae Komom (Weekend ft.),
Ann ette Petruso (Abnec).
STAFF: Caina Bacon, Greg Bale, Margo Baumgart, Skot Bea, Melesa Rose Boardo, Joi Wlk, AndrewJ. Cahn, Jonathan Chalk
Rchard S. Davis, Gabriel Feldbr.g, Rosanne Freed, Forest Green IIl, J dele Holaday, Aaron Hamburger, Stephen Henderson
Jonathan Higgins, ina Hodas, Roger Hsia, Made Jacobson, Andrea Kachude.. Kdesten Knudsen, Rona Kobe, Chile Lepley. Jenny~
McKee, Kraten McMurphy, Amy Mng, John Morgan, Michle Philip, Dan Poux, Aui, Ratner. Jeff Rosenberg, Valede Shuman,
Chris. Slovey, Scott Steuing, Abaea Straus. Card.e Walco, tedieles Wegor, Sarah Weidman, Josh Wornh.
PHOTO Kritoffer Gillette, Kenneth J. Smoller, Editors
STAFF: Anthony M. Croll, Michele Guy, Doug Kanter, Heather Lowman, Sharon Mushe, Suzie Paley, Molly Stevens, Paud Taylor.
xr:,r z r wr~r o ers o m r-immar aano rm------------r------r--------------------mmass

i
Y
r
#
t
t

DISPLAY SALES Shannon Bke, MAnag
ASSISTANT MANAGER: Laurel Idncyi

PW

El 0 - m04a]911eA j2

1 1

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan