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March 13, 1992 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1992-03-13

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*I

Page 2-The Michigan Daily- Friday, March 13, 1992

LABOR
Continued from page 1
Democratic contenders are also
in keen competition for the labor
vote after the exit of Iowa Senator
Tom Harkin from the race.
Organized labor support for
Tsongas has been cool because of his
opposition to a ban on hiring re-
placement workers for strikers.
Rather than back away from that
position, the former Massachusetts
senator told, about 50 United Auto
Workers members at Hermes
Automotive Manufacturing Corp.
in Detroit that he wants to do away
with strikes.
Requiring labor and management
to arbitrate labor disputes would
end antagonism between the two
groups, he said.
Some members of UAW Local
174 were unconvinced.
"If you take away the power of
the union, we have no bargaining

power. We're at their mercy," said
Ives Roper, of Detroit.
The final answer, Tsongas said, is
a growing economy brought about
by his plans for a capital gains tax
cut, increased capital for new busi-
nesses and investment in scientific
research.
Tsongas also said a proposed
free-trade agreement with Mexico,
fought by labor, wouldn't mean a
net loss of jobs if the United States
invested in economic growth to re-
place ones sent to Mexico.
He declined to predict how well
he'll do in Michigan, but conceded
he is a stranger to Michigan voters,
especially Blacks, because he has had
less money than Clinton.
Quayle, in Michigan a day before
a campaign swing by President Bush,
spoke to about 200 people at the
Pontiac Rotary Club meeting at the
Pontiac Silverdome.
He told reporters that workers
have little to fear from the free

trade agreement.
"I am convinced that exports
will help lead the nation to eco-
nomic recovery. If you think
Mexico can make a better dieselen-
gine that what I saw today, I dis-
agree," he said.
Quayle declined to criticize
General Motors Corp. for its deci-
sion to cut 9,000 jobs from
Michigan.
But Clinton told a crowd of at
least 300 at a town meeting at
Macomb Community College that
automakers have contributed to
their own problems with inefficien-
cies and price increases.
"Those are management prob-
lems, not labor problems," he said.
He said GM came to the govern-
ment looking for tax cuts and pro-
tection from imports, and regula-
tory relief, and got them. "They
went to the auto workers and asked
for concessions and they got 'em and
got em and got em.

U-M Dearborn students criticize
regents on loong tuition hikes
by Melissa Peerless
Daily Administration Reporter studying. tion, you will not have any student

el

s.

DEARBORN - University of
Michigan-Dearborn students ex-
pressed concern about tuition in-
creases during the public comments
session of the University Board of
Regents' monthly meeting held on
the campus yesterday.
Donald Knapp, a junior and rep-
resentative of the student govern-
ment's academic house, said, "I am
deeply concerned about the thought
of a double-digit tuition increase."
Knapp said most students at the
Dearborn campus have to work to
pay for their education, and higher
tuition will force them to work more
and sacrifice time for classes and

Knapp pointed out that the
University's Dearborn campus re-
ceives the least amount of state
funding per student of any university
in Michigan.
University President James
Duderstadt said, "We are very con-
cerned about that, and have been
working very hard to try to improve
the situation. We agree with you and
support you."
Matthew Kappel, a Michigan
Collegiate Coalition delegate, said
he and his friends will have to quit
school if tuition increases continue.
"If we cannot afford an educa-

We'd be more than happy to see all
of you regents and high-level admin-
istrators take pay cuts," he said.

Regent Neal Nielsen
Brighton) responded, "I don't
one red cent for doing this. I
time off from my work to do
community service for
University."

(R-
get
take
this
the

Kappel also suggested that the
regents' visit the Dearborn campus
more than once per year and com-
municate more with students.
"The only correspondance we
have with you is the yearly letter an-
nouncing the tuition hikes," he said.

Calvin and Hobbes

by Bill Watterson BILL
Continued from page 1

MO PA AM
DUES IN . E .
air

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in defense spending could be de-
voted to increased domestic spend-
ing, but President Bush has said he
would veto any such legislation.
The spokesperson said the
Appropriations Committee will wait
until after Sep. 30 - the end of the
fiscal year - to determine whether
to approve the increased financial
aid outlined by the reauthorization
act.
State Sen. John Schwarz (R-

Battle Creek), co-chair of the
Michigan Higher Education
Subcommittee, said the increased
federal financial aid will have to
compete with already-existing state
loan programs, such as State
Guarantee Loans.
"It would be difficult to disman-
tle state loans for a federal direct
loan program," Schwarz said.
Schwarz said the decision
whether to implement the changes
outlined in the reauthorization act
currently is not a top legislative pri-
ority.

The reauthorization act simplifies
the procedure of how need for fi-
nancial aid is determined. The loan
and grant systems have been com-
bined into one, the forms have been
shortened, and students, once ap-
proved to receive federal aid, will
not need to reapply to receive aid the
following year.
To lessen defaults on federal
loans, schools with default rates ex-
ceeding 25 percent will be dropped
from financial aid eligibility. The
previous threshold of the Higher
Education Act was 25 percent.

0

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113

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Schoolkids
Records
WAMX Mix 107
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Present

20TH ANNIVERSARY SHOWING

CLINTON
Continued from page 1

READ THE

A .OKO FILM DIRECTED BY STEVE GEBHARDT
JOHN LENNON
AND YOKO ONO
BOB SEGER " STEVIE WONDER
COMMANDER CODY & HIS LOST PLANET AIRMEN
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JERRY RUBIN " ED SANDERS " PHIL OCHS
ARCHIE SHEPP & ROSWELL RUDD W/ CJQ
TEAGARDEN & VANWINKLE " THE UP
All Seats Speaking about the film: STEVE GEBHARDT, Director
Reserved PETER ANDREWS, Event Producer JOHN SINCLAIR, Victim
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Michigan Theater *O EO L
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LEE
Continued from page 1
group of people can be when they
set aside the bullshit."
Lee has written, produced, di-
rected, and acted in five movies, in-
cluding last year's Jungle Fever. Lee
has also directed and appeared with
Chicago Bull Michael Jordan in sev-
eral Nike tennis shoe commercials.
Due to Lee's $15,000 appearance
fee, UAC was having difficulties
finding money in the group's budget
to fund the project. Bernstein said.
To solve this problem, Lee's visit
is being sponsored under a system
called "percentage in, percentage
out."
"The groups get in, help run the
program, and get out with their
original money and maybe more,"
Bernstein said.
"It's not for a profit, but to put
the money back into their organiza-
tions," Bernstein continued. "The
groups provided capital for the pro-
gram, giving them a stake in the pro-
ject. Not only will they get back
their investment plus some extra,
they will be involved from the be-
ginning to the end.
"This is a completely new way of
THREAT
Continued from page 1
There were no injuries or damage
to the building reported.
"I was sitting there around quar-
ter to eight when a voice came over
the loudspeaker saying, 'Please
leave thesbuilding,"' said Stacy
Tittle, a library employee. "They
also said that the library would open
again tomorrow.
"They didn't tell us what was
happening other than we should
evacuate as quickly as possible so
we left," Tittle said. "No one knew
what was going on."

financing a program on this cam-
pus," Bernstein said. "There has
been a lot of ups and downs in this
project. But we are gaining momen-
tum as a group."
Many of the visit sponsors said
they look forward to the event.
"It's a little confusing with so
many groups working together,"
Interfraternity Council President
Bruce Namerow said. "But I think it
is very exciting to see all of the
groups helping to run and fund Lee's
visit."
"This is such a major event with
many diverse groups; sponsorship
became very appealing," said Ann
Kaufman, a member of the LSA
Student Government. "It is also a
good way for groups to make money
because it is a secure contract. But
that is secondary."
Inter-Cooperative Council mem-
ber Ali Johnson said Lee's visit cost
"a very large amount of our budget."
But he added, "We knew this project
was very important. It's got a lot of
different groups together."
. "It is a wide variety of organiza-
tions on campus who hadn't worked
with each other before," Panhellenic
Association member Meghan Cleary
said.
Robert Sullivan was also on duty
at the library when the bomb threat
was called in. "I worked up to seven
and then I took my break. There was
nothing wrong when I left," Sullivan
said.
"But when I returned from break
all of the doors were locked," he
continued. "The police told me to go
home because there had been a
bomb threat."
"We are just going to go along
with Public Safety and see what they
find out," said Wendy Lougee, head
of the Graduate Library. "They did a
search of the building. I'm sure the
DPS will have a report in the
morning."

0
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SATURDAY, APRIL 18 " 8:00 P.M.
Ann Arbor * Crisler Arena
Tickets available at all *" outlets and the Michigan Union
box office or charge by phone at 763-TKTS or 645-6666.
- Office of Major Events Presentation -

MEMENN^

G S'

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