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February 14, 1992 - Image 12

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The Michigan Daily, 1992-02-14

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Page 12-The Michigan Daily- Friday, February 14, 1992

Sell your soul to become a movie star
by Sarah Weidman

Wanna be in pictures? The opportunity has ar-
rived on the University campus. Director Brian
C. Brock IV will be holding auditions for his
movie Filet of Souls: A Thrilogy this Saturday.
The title alone gives audiences a sense of Brock's
style. Filet of Souls reflects the morbid slap-
stick that is sure to permeate the film, which
Brock will cast and film in Michigan.
Born and raised in Flint, Michigan, Brock
will be shooting the film in surrounding areas.
Having recently returned to Flint for knee
surgery, he began talking to the locals. "I real-
ized there was a lot of talent up here, acting and
crew-wise," he says. He is looking for actors of
all ages, with a focus on the college age bracket.
Filet of Souls will incorporate three short
stories in which the devil and his girlfriend,
Siobhan, seek souls from hapless victims. The

devil - or St. Luke, as Brock refers to him -
throws out a temptation, leaving the characters
to choose either a good or a bad path.
The storylines highlight Brock's dry sense of
humor, and range from a secretary aspiring to be
a contestant on her favorite gameshow to a dis-
trict attorney anxious to work his psychokinetic
powers on the lust of his life.
Brock's sense of humor is revealed by his fa-
vorite scene from a movie - the swordfight in
Monty Python and the Holy Grail, when blood
and limbs fly high. "The guy just won't die!"
exclaims Brock.
But despite his love for gory slapstick, Brock
does not feel compelled to make any particular
kind of film. "I will sell my soul to make any
movie," he says. Brock has already written many
other scripts, including an action/adventure film

and a comedy.
So far, though, he hasn't had the best of luck.
An episode of Miami Vice that he wrote never
made it to the small screen after a writer's
strike inconveniently ended. Two stories of the
thrilogy were to be aired on The New Twilight'
Zone, but the show went off the air before Brock i
could sign on the dotted line.
Brock remains optimistic, however. "If you
can't look at life and laugh," he says, "then
what's the point of living life?"
Brian C, Brock IV will hold auditions for FILET
OF SOULS: A THRILOGY tomorrow from 11
a.m. until 5 p.m. in the Michigan Union~-
Anderson Rooms A and B. There is a $5 audition,
fee. Call 767-4796 for more info. "Experience is"
not necessary - DESIRE is."

"

Stand up and laugh at Carol Leifer
For all of you who want to devote the rest of your life standing in front
of an exposed brick wall with a white-hot, unforgiving spotlight in your
eyes, a microphone which constantly rings with electronic feedback,
and an audience full of smart-mouthed hecklers, it sounds like stand-
up to us. This weekend, catch a queen of stand-up, Carol Leifer
(rhymes with reefer, not with heifer) use her humor with grace. Not
the budding flower that Tenuta is, and using none of the domestic
goddess shtick of Roseanne, Leifer looks at life and laughs. She
doesn't fall back on gross jokes or sexist humor; gender-bending is
imore her style. "I don't have any children," she's said on Letterman,
"well ... none that I know about." Performances are at the Mainstreet
Comedy Showcase, Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. Tick-
ets are $15, $13; call 996-9080 for information.

Jimmie Dale Gilmore
After Awhile
Johnnie Johnson
Johnnie B. Bad
Elektra Nonesuch / American Explorer
Series
Between the original pioneers of
contemporary popular American
music, such as Robert Johnson and
Woody Guthrie, and the stars of to-
day, lay the musicians featured in
the American Explorer Series. These
performers, though occasionally as-
sociated with nationally popular
artists, have based their careers on
limited, regional success.
Their legacies, however, have
been felt by countless others who
have combined their traditions with
more national ambitions. What
makes these performers special is
that they are still living. To honor
their careers, Elektra decided to

release discs of new material rather
than bests ofs. This shows that even
the most traditional artists can be
just as modern as anything else
released today.
Jimmie Dale Gilmore is known
by some as the leader of the
Flatlanders, which was to modern
folk what the Modern Lovers was
to the punk movement. Fusing coun-
try and folk music with beautiful
melodies and lyrics, the band was
very influential on artists like Folk
Fest '92 performers Lyle Lovett and
Robert Earl Keen, as well as Nanci
Griffith and Rosanne Cash.
He says in the liner notes he likes
his songs to have an "abstract/
earthy balance and a certain degree
of ambiguity," and this is evident on
"After Awhile." With story-
telling songs framed around intu-
itive lyrics like "When a treasure is
yours, no need to steal one" and

"the journey is worth the price of
going," this disc is the one country
record you should buy if you feel
the need for one.
Johnnie Johnson's role in music
history begins with Chuck Berry's
band, and continues through today as
being one of rock's pre-eminent pi-
ano players. He stopped playing
with Berry in the early '70s because
he really didn't like travelling all
over the place, and he'd rather form
his own band and play in clubs
around St. Louis.

Johnnie B. Bad focuses ono
Johnson's piano playing amidst a
celebrated cast, which includes;
NRBQ, Eric Clapton and Keith.
Richards & the X-Pensive Winos.
Apart from some other stellar'
blues players, Johnson needs a band
full of top-notch musicians to egg
on his brilliant boogie-blues solo-
ing. This record was a lot of fun to'
listen to, because you could tell the
performers had a ball recording it.
-Andrew J Cahn

BEAT.
Continued from page 10

heated issues ... if the audience
doesn't get angry, then we didn't get
our point across."

production seeks to educate, not of- THE BEAT OF DIS CONTENT will
fer solutions. be performed at the University
m.Balducci expects a iegative reac- Dance Department, Studio A on
tion from the audience, which she tonight and tomorrow at 8p.m., and
welcomes. "Anger drove us to do Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets are $3 and
the show. We will bring up some can be purchased at the door.

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FOLKS
Continued from Page 10
"Too Many Martyrs" and songs by
Fishbone and the Red Hot Chili
Peppers. This should probably set
him apart from the evenings other
two performers, O'Connor and
David Mosher, who both play
guitars and sing in a country style.
The difference, however, did not
prevent O'Connor from wanting
Blair to play at this event after see-
ing him win a guitar contest at the
(now defunct) Third Coast.
David Mosher, another recent
award winner, was named "Most
Deserving of Wider Recognition"
by the Metro Times, but like the
others, he too is more frequently
seen as a sideman. You may have seen
him at the Ark, jamming with the

RFD Boys or the Mike Berst En-
semble.
Mosher is also affiliated witly
the Society of Friends. O'Connor
says Mosher was instrumental in
securing the Friends' Center as the
venue for Sunday night's show. "We
really wanted to have the event in a
fairly large place," says O'Connor.-
This concert, as well as the re-
turn of music to the Canterbury
House, shows that the local folk
music scene has been growing re-
cently. Supporting our local singer-
songwriters can only help it
progress even further.
NEW VOICES: THE BEST OF ANN
ARBOR'S SINGER-SONGWRITERS
takes place this Sunday at 7:30 p.m.
at the Friends' Center, 1420 Hill St.
Admission is $5 at the door. For
more info, call 677-4249.

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9

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"

1 I,

Sun. Fe

Mon. Fe

The University of Michigan
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
3b. 16 Campus Band
Myron Moss, Jeff Grogen, conductors
Music of Arnold, Grainger and Vaughan
Williams
Hill Auditorium, 4 p.m.
Faculty Piano Recital
by Dickran Atamlan
Gonzalez: Calles de Buenos Aires
Prokofiev: Sonata No. 6 in A Major, op.82
Bach: English Suite No. 2 in a minor, BWV
807
Moussorgsky: Pictures at an Exhibition
School of Music Recital Hall, 8 p.m.
eb. 17 University Philharmonla
Orchestra with Concerto
Competition Winners
Donald Schleicher and David Tang,
conductors
Music of Arutunian, Liszt, Prokofiev,
Stravinsky and Vivaldi
Hill Auditorium, 8 p.m.
b. 18 Chamber Choir
Paul Rardin, conductor
Stravinsky: Mass
Brahms: "Zigeunerlieder"
Hill Auditorium, 8 p.m.
eb. 19 University Symphony Orchestra
with Concerto Competition
Winners
Gustav Meier, Cindy Egolf-Sham Rao,
Matthew Savery, conductors
Music of Bart6k, Copland, Dohndnyi,
Hogan, Hummel and Rachmaninov
17:11 A . :..- - *..,

Tue. Fe
Wed. F

*I

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