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February 14, 1992 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1992-02-14

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, February 14, 1992 - Page 3,

Parliament member visits 'U'

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by Mona Qureshi
Daily Staff Reporter
British Parliament member
Bernie Grant discussed the growing
tide of racist sentiment in Europe
and the United States in a lecture ti-
tled "The Resurgence of Racism in
Europe" at Hale Auditorium yes-.
terday.
"Europe is going to be the most
turbulent part of the world for the
next 10 years," Grant said. He cited
the rise of Neo-Nazism in Germany
and the Front National in France led
by right-winger Jean-Marie Le Pen
as examples of increasing racial ten-
sions.
"There is a tremendous rise in
racist attacks," Grant said. "Of
course, because Black people are
identifiable, they take the brunt," he
added.
Grant told the audience that
Blacks are the main target of racism,
but trends in racism also discrimi-
nate against Jews, Gypsies, and
homosexuals.
Jean-Marie Le Pen's rise in popu-
larity poses a strong threat to all
anti-racists, Grant said. He said in
the upcoming French presidential
elections, Le Pen is expected to re-
ceive up to 31 percent of the votes.
Grant said that while Le Pen's
Front National says it does not like
Blacks, it admits that some Blacks,

like those from Guadeloupe, are
more French, and they are more ac-
cepted than Blacks from North
Africa.
Blacks from North Africa are
predominantly Muslim and Le Pen
is manipulating the French govern-
ment into thinking it needs to re-
store its traditionally Christian na-
tion, Grant said. "It's almost a holy
war, or Jihad, against Islam," Grant
said.
And it's not just the well-
known groups like the Front,
National or the Neo-Nazis that are
behind the resurgence of racism,
Grant said. "There are well known
'Here are rich nations
with wealth land that
can't even take in
4,000. These people
are a disgrace.'
~ - Bernie Grant
British Parliament
member
political leaders using (the issue of
racism) to their advantage," Grant
said.
Competition between Frances
President Francois Mitterand and
Paris Mayor Jacques Chirac is

an example,
Grant said. He
explained that
both politician
are using idea
that there is no
room for
refugees or im-
migrants to gain
popularity in
elections.
Addressing
the situation in
Great Britain,
Grant said Prime
Minister John
Major "has
joined this un-
holy course."
He drew a
parallel between
this

L
"U

Grant

,'~
aIy ,,.
F}".

European trend to one which is hap-
pening in the U.S. - the returning
of 4,000 Haitians asking for politi-
cal asylum to their own country.
"There is some funny business
here," Grant said.
He said larger countries should
be able to support these refugees as
smaller countries like Kenya and
Pakistan do. "Here are rich nations
with wealth land that can't even
take in 4,000. These people are a dis-

grace," he said.
Members of the audience sad
Grant's lecture caused them to think
about racism in Europe and tom
United States. "There's just so,,
many things he said ... it just abhors
me. Where can I go that racism i
not going on?" said Michigan alum-
nae Michelle Sampson.
Grant is also the chair of the
Standing Conference Against
Racism in Europe.

I

Love is in the air '-
LSA Seniors Becky Wright and Kate Laporte slice the thorns off roses
preparing for Valentine's Day sales yesterday at Normandie Flowers.

i _... r

Professional frats differ from norm

by Guillermo Pinczuk
They may not be part of the
Interfraternity Council (IFC) or
hold formals in Chicago or Toronto,
but members of the University's
professional fraternities said they
offer many educational and social
opportunities for their members.
There are several professional fra-
ternities which serve graduate and
undergraduate students, including
Alpha Chi Sigma (Chemistry),
Delta Sigma Delta (Dentistry), Nu
Sigma Nu (Medical), Phi Alpha
Kappa (Social Work Graduates), Phi
Chi (Medical), Phi Delta Phi (Law)
a and Phi Rho Sigma (Medical).

Although these fraternities have
only one or two social events each
semester, members said there is a
sense of comradeship shared by the
members.
"It is a way of associating and
getting close with people who have
the same interest as you do.
Everyone has the same common
goal. It makes us a close group,"
said Delta Sigma Delta President
Tom Gebeck.
Third year medical student Sina
Sabeg said that Phi Rho Sigma
"creates a sense of unity within the
medical school ... It's nice to be in a
situation where you can get to meet.

other medical students."
Members of these fraternities said
there are academic benefits as well
because the younger members can
learn from the advice of the older
members.
These fraternities also sponsor
several student-faculty parties - for
instance, Nu Sigma Nu members
invite faculty members to a
Christmas dinner.
The rush process at these fraterni-
ties differs from that of the social
fraternities. Delta Sigma Delta has

an open rush, but others like Nu
Sigma Nu and Phi Rho Sigma send
letters to medical students inviting
them to look at the fraternity.
Despite differences in rush poli-
cies, most University professional
fraternities do not have a pledge pe-
riod.
However, Phi Chi Vice President
Adam Johnson said that their initia-
tion week is something special.
"Initiation week was really fun, but I
wouldn't want to do it again," he
said.

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Bring your date
to Scorekeepers

Free Food Buffet
50g Drafts, $3.00 Pitchers
3 p.m. - Midnight
NO COVER CHARGE

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THE LIST
What's happening in Ann Arbor today

DanCing to your
e classic rock hit

Meetings
Friday
Japan Student Association,
general mtg, Michigan Union,
Kuenzel Rm, 8:30 p.m.
Sunday
Huron Valley Greens, action
planning mtg about Detroit summer,
Guild House, 802 Monroe St., 6:30
p.m.
U of M Chess Club, weekly mtg,
Michigan League, 1 p.m.
Speakers
Friday
"Culture, Psychology and
Pathology: An Alternative,"
Dr. Linda James Meyers, East
Conference Room, Rackham Bldg.,
1:30 p.m.-3:15 p.m.
"Jewish Diaspora and German
literature," Nelly Sachs and Walter
benjamin, Department of Germanic
languages and literatures, Rackham
Amphitheatre, 9:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
"Poland's Perpetual Return to
Europe," Dr. Jerzy Jedlicki,
Institute of History, Polish Academy
of Sciences, Annual Copernicus
Lecture, Rackham fourth floor
amphitheatre, 8:00 p.m. reception
immediately following in the
Assembly hall.
Saturday
"Symposium: The Formation
'of a National Consciousness:
Poland," East Conference Room,
Rackham Bldg, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
Sunday
"The Politics of War and
Peace," College Democrats,
Professor Tom Collier, Wolverine
:Rm, Michigan Union, 6:30 p.m.
Furthermore
Friday
Safewalk, night-time safety walk-
ing service. Sun-Thurs 8 p.m.-1:30
a.m., Fri-Sat, 8 p.m.-11:30 p.m. Stop
by 102 UGLi or call 936-1000. Also,
extended hours: Sun-Thurs 1-3 a.m.
Stop by Angell Hall Computing
'Center or call 763-4246.
Northwalk, North Campus
nighttime team walking service. Sun-
'hur 8 p.m.-11:30 p.m. Stop by 2333
4ursley or call 763-WALK.
ECB Peer Writing Tutors,
Angell/Mason Hall Computing
Center, 7-11 p.m.

Leagues, Spring Golf League, Spring
Science Day Camp, and Spring
Pioneer Living Day Camp.
Support Abortion Right
Rally, Ann Arbor Committee tq
Defend Abortion and Reproductive
rights, steps of the Michigan Union,
12:00 p.m.
Activation, Alpha Phi Omega,
Michigan Union Ballroom, 5:30 p.m.
Film Series, Chrysler Center Aud,
North Campus, free, 5 p.m.
St. Elmo's Fire, free movie,
International Center, Rm 9, 8 p.m.
U of M Bridge Club, weekly
duplicate bridge game, Michigani
Union, Tap Rm, 7:15 p.m.
U of M Ninjitsu Club, practice, I-
M Bldg, wrestling rm, 6:30-8 p.m.
Michigan Ultima Team, practice
9:30 p.m.
U-M Taekwondo Club. Friday
workout. 1200 CCRB, 6-8 p.m.
Beginners welcome.
U-M Shorin-Ryu Karate-Do
Club, practice. CCRB Martial Arts
Rm, 6-7 p.m.
Undergraduate Psychology
Department, Undergraduate
psychology advising, walk-in or
appointment, K-108 West Quad, 9
a.m-4 p.m.
African American Art Exhibit
& Sale, New Hope Baptist Church,
218 Chapin-St., 6-9 p.m.
Yost Ice Arena, public skating,
12:00 p.m.-12:50 p.m.
Japanese film series, A star
athlete, free film, Lorch Hall Aud, 7
p.m.
Winter Evening at
Cobblestone Farm, 2781 Packardj
Rd., 6-8 p.m.
Career Planning and
Placement, Introduction to the Job
Search, CP&P Program Rm, 12:10
p.m.-1:00 p.m., Targeting not-for-
profit organizations, 4:10 p.m.-5:00
p.m.
Saturday
Ingalls House cleanup,
sponsored by Silver Wings society,
meet at North hall, 12:45 p.m.
Reform Havurah Havdalah
Service, Hillel, 7:30 p.m.
"Willy Wonka and the
Chocolate Factory," Hillel, 8:00
p.m. and 10:00 p.m.

MICHIGAN VS. MSU ON SATURDAY -- DRINK SPECIALS
OpenMon -Sat 11.30 amto 2 am «21& overafter 8 pm
310 S. Maynard " Ann Arbor, MI 48103 " (313) 995-0100

III

1/
~WA

GENERAL MOTORS
VOLUNTEER SPIRIT AWARD
*1989
in189aciation with
University of Michigan
Student Organization
Development Center
Attention
Student
Volunteers!
Submit Your Applications for the GM
Volunteer Spirit Award!

Friday, March 6, 1992

f

2022 Michigan Union
(313) 753-5900

Sunday
Chapter Meeting, Alpha Phi
Omega, Michigan Union Kuntel rm.,

11:

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