100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 12, 1992 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1992-02-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, February 12, 1992 - Page 3

Dow faces
breast
Implant
aftermath
DETROIT (AP) - The outcome
of Dow Corning Corp.'s debacle
with its silicone-gel breast im-
plants depends on whether it can as-
age women who have the implants
'Ind;regain their trust, experts said
yesterday.
Dow Corning took the first step
Monday evening by replacing its top
executives with an expert in corpo-
rate:crisis management.
At stake for the Midland, Mich.-
based company is its ability to re-
main viable whether or not it ever
makes another breast implant. Dow
*orning disclosed through docu-
meits released Monday that it has
known for two decades about poten-
tial health problems from leaking
and rupture of its implants.
A frightened public left to won-
der" whether a product will cause
them harm overrides any legal lia-
bility, said Gerald C. Meyers, for-
mer chair and chief executive of
4merican Motors Corp.
Yesterday's action is a turning
point in my view," said Meyers, a
West Bloomfield, Mich., business
consultant who wrote "When it
Hits the Fan," a how-to guide to
managing corporate crises.
"They've now made a move
which shows they are trying to
manage the situation rather than be-
ing controlled by it." ,
4) Keith McKennon, a Dow
Chemical Co. executive vice presi-
dent who helped steer Dow
Chemical out of potential public re-
latipns disasters in Agent Orange
and dioxin controversies over the
last two decades, took over yester-
day as chair and chief executive of
Dow Corning.
f'He's been successful with crisis
*Wanagement before," Meyers said.
He helped turn that whole corpo-
ration around and the company re-
established itself.
"Up until now, this has been a
show apparently run by lawyers and
business managers. That has meant
the company has lost a whole lot in
the credibility category."
An estimated 1 million U.S.
omen have silicone gel breast im-
plants and twice that many have
them worldwide.

Students debate
redeputization at
MSA meeting

by Joshua Meckler
Daily Staff Reporter
Michigan Student Assembly
(MSA) members and students
engaged in lively debate over the re-
deputization of University police last
night as the issue involved itself in
several other items on the agenda.
Of key interest to many of the
student speakers was how
deputization has affected Blacks and
other people of color on campus, and
how well MSA can represent the
feelings of its constituents.
Regina Freer, a member of
Progressive People of Color, said,
"The police have already harassed
women such as myself because I
look the way I do."
She asked the assembly to make
sure that it represents all types of
people when it interacts with the
University. "Let them know they're
disregarding voices of thousands on
this campus including your own. I'm
depending on you to provide some
leadership that the University isn't
willing to admit exists."
After hearing the speakers, LSA
junior and Black Student Union
Political Action Committee
Chairperson David Marable said,
"We are totally against deputization.
This is a very serious issue to
African-American students on cam-
pus.
"As a representative of African-
American students, we would like to
have a meeting with the administra-
tion, including President Duderstadt,
and discuss this issue as soon as pos-
sible."
MSA President James Green said

he will be meeting with Duderstadt.
prior to next week's public hearings;
and that the deputization issue will
be a key point of discussion.
Professor James Diana, president
of the faculty government said he
believes the deputization issue has
been decided and that it would be
best to concentrate on influencing
the policy as it is put into place. "If
we try to influence the selection of
the (oversight) committees, then at
least we can have some power to in-
fluence."
Also discussed at last night's
meeting was a proposal to put a cap
on the current fee of $6.27 per-
semester that each student pays to
MSA. Under the proposal, MSA.
could not increase the fee without a
majority vote among students.
Student Legal Services (SLS)
Director Doug Lewis, whose organi-
zation is funded by MSA, said the
assembly should take steps to ensure
that SLS remains funded regardless
of any fee adjustments.
"In your effort to destroy (MSA),
don't hurt your constituents by re-
moving probably the most cost-ef-
fective service they are ever going to
have," Lewis said.
As a way to avoid problems if the
proposal passes, he suggested sepa-
rating the SLS budget from MSA,
making the fee similar to that of the
health service fee. Another possibil-
ity he mentioned was creating a min-
imum value for the MSA fee which
would just be to cover SLS's ex-.
penses.
- Daily Staff Reporter Loretta
Lee contributed to this story.

Pipe dream
Cindy Van de Riet, a second-year student in the School of Music's masters program, practices the pipe organ
in Hill Auditorium. She is scheduled to give a recital at Hill March 24 at 8 p.m.

TA receives back pay after misclassification as instructional aide

by Karen Pier
Daily Graduate Schools Reporter
A teaching assistant who was
misclassified as an "instructional
aide" - a lower-paying post held
by undergraduates - recently was
granted retroactive pay by a Univer-
sity grievance committee.
The University also gave soci-
ology graduate student Bobby Clark
the retroactive title of TA Jan. 10 in

response to a grievance filed by the
Graduate Employees Organization
(GEO).
Clark had been misclassified as
an instructional aide during fall
term 1991 when he worked as a So-
ciology 330 TA, GEO organizer
Phillis Englebert said.
Clark refused to comment.
Because of that misclassification,
Englebert said, he was not on the

same pay scale as a TA, nor did he re-
ceive benefits, such as health insur-
ance and possible tuition waivers,
free course texts and other instruc-
tional materials as he would have if
he had been classified as a TA.
Although Clark's work was the
same as a TA's, he had no official
appointment as that, and he was paid
out of scholarship funds, Engelbert
said.

GEO Vice President Dave Toland
said that might be illegal.
TAs and instructional aides
normally are paid out of department
funds, Senior said.
GEO said in a press release that it
first became aware of the misclassi-
fication last November.
GEO took the second step of the
three-step grievance process by con-
tacting sociology department Chair

Mayer Zald about the error in late
November 1991.
Zald, who denied the grievance,
refused comment to the Daily.
GEO then took the complaint to
the University administration.
Toland said the misclassificationc
could have been intentional. "It's
possible the sociology department'
was trying to save some money.

THE LIST
What's happening in Ann Arbor today

IMeetings
Ann Arbor Coalition to
Unleash Power, Michigan Union,
Crofoot Rm, 7:30 p.m.
Undergraduate Political
Science Association, m a s s
meeting, 1209 Michigan Union, 7:30
p.m.
Hindu Students Council,
weekly mtg, Bhagavad Gita- Chapter
5, learn Hindi, B115 MLB, 8 p.m.
orean Students Association,
weekly mtg, Michigan Union,
Anderson Rm, 5 p.m.
Latin American' Solidarity
Committee, weekly mtg,
Michigan Union, Welker Rm, 8 p.m.
Rainforest Action Movement,
weekly mtg, 1046 Dana (School of
Natural Resources), 7 p.m.
Students Concerned About
Animal Rights, weekly mtg,
Doininick's, 7 p.m.
Pre trip meeting, Conference Rm
of the NCRB (North Campus
Recreational Building), 7:00 p.m.-
8:0 p.m.
U of M Shorin-Ryu Karate-Do
Club, weekly meeting, CCRB
Martial Arts rm, 8-9 p.m.
Speakers
"What are you going to do
with your BA in English?"
Michigan Union, 7: 30 p.m.- 9 :00
p.m.
"From Molecular Entrapment
to Enzymatic Catalisis" D r.
Martin Tanner, 1640 Chemistry Bldg,
4:00 p.m.
"Towards Self Management/
the Leadership Challenge"
Tenneco Training Ctr, School of
Nursing, 8:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
"Diode Lasers and their
applications in Analytical
Chemistry," Will Kowalchyk,
1650 Chemistry Bldg. 4:00 p.m.
Furthermore

extended hours: Sun-Thurs 1-3 a.m.
Stop by Angell Hall Computing
Center or call 763-4246.
N o r t h w a l k, North Campus
nighttime team walking service. Sun-
Thur 8 p.m.-11:30 p.m. Fri-Sat 8:00
p.m.- 11:30 p.m. Stop by 2333
Bursley or call 763-WALK.
"When the Legends die," film
Continuing Native American Film
Series Natural Science Auditorium,
7:30 p.m.
Ann Arbor Department of
Parks and Recreation,
registration for Over 30 Hockey
Leagues, Spring Science Day Camp,
and Spring Pioneer Living Day Camp.
Public Skating, Yost Ice Arena,
12:50 p.m.
Undergraduate Psychology
Peer Advising, Undergraduate
Psychology Office, K-108 West Quad,
9:00 a.m.- 4: 00 p.m.
ECB Writing Tutors,
Angell/Mason Hall Computing
Center, 7-11 p.m.
U-M Taekwondo Club, Monday
workout. CCRB Martial Arts Rm
2275, 6:30-8 p.m. Beginners
welcome.
UM Students of Objectivism,
discussion on objectivism: Th e
Philosophy of Ayn Rand, Chapter
two 2212 MLB, 8 p.m.
Grief Recovery Workshop,
five-part series, Hospice of
Washtenaw.
East Quad/RC Social Group for
Lesbians, Gay Men, and
Bisexuals, weekly mtg, 9 p.m.
U of M Ninjitsu Club, practice,
I-M Bldg, wrestling rm, 7-8:30 p.m
Stress and Time Management,
Consultations with peer counselors
available, 3100 Michigan Union, 1-
3 p.m.
Career Planning and
Placement., Welcome to CP&P,
3:10 p.m., CP&P Library;
RP .C-arcihng Orgniza7tions and

Man with concealed
mtapon caught in
MLB
A Modern Language Building
staff member contacted the
University Department of Public
BEAT
Safety (DPS) about a suspicious
man seen carrying VCR equipment
at 11:40 p.m. Friday.
The staff member reported that
the man dropped the equipment
when seen and ran out of the build-

ing. A description was given to
DPS officers.
The police later located a sus-
pect matching the description, and
found a weapon hidden in his cloth-
ing. He was charged with carrying a
concealed weapon.
The suspect has an outstanding
bench warrant with the Ann Arbor
Police Department, according to
DPS reports.
Fatal attraction
A resident at 1117 Church St.
was assaulted by a man who en-
tered the house in search of his ex-
girlfriend at 2:19 a.m. Sunday, Ann
Arbor police reported.
Each of the three witnesses who
live in the house told police offi-
cers that the subject was very

drunk and belligerent. When asked
to leave, the man refused, demand-
ing to see the woman.
The man allegedly hit the resi-
dent after he attempted to stop him
from going upstairs, where the
woman was sleeping. The resident
suffered minor abrasions, but did
not seek any medical attention. -
Police officers arrived just as
the man fled, traveling north on
Church Street. Officers later went
to his home, but he was not there.
The residents told police the
man has been harassing the woman,
and had arrived at the house with-
out permission about a week ago in
an attempt to speak with her.
Police records indicated that
prosecution is desired and the re-
port is pending further investiga-

tion.
Hospital
employee
attempts assault
A verbal altercation between
two female employees of the
University Hospital on Monday
resulted in an attempted assault
with a knife, according to DPS re-
ports.
The verbal fight took place in a
kitchen area of the hospital, said
DPS Lt. Vernon Baisden. One of the
women picked up a knife that was
available, but was stopped by other
hospital employees in the vicinity.
Investigations are continuing.
- by Lauren Dermer.
Daily Crime Reporter

Kathleen Young
Yacht Charters
Attn: Students!
It's not too soon to start plan-
ning that Spring Break trip.
Spend seven days of fun and
sun on a sailing yacht in the
Bahamas.
Call anytime for details.
1-800-447-2458

Sponsored by Counseling Services
o 0 9UFD 0 0Ur 0H 0
FO NR TE 9 - $$0E Y
76-GUIDE IS A CONFIDENTIAL PEER COUNSELING PROGRAM SPONSORED BY
COUNSELING SERVICES. APPLICANTS NEED TO BE ENROLLED STUDENTS WHO
ARE GOOD AT WORKING WITH PEOPLE. NO PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE IS NECES-
SARY. GUIDE WORKERS ARE PAID AND WORK APPROXIMATELY 15 HOURS PER
WEEK. APPLICATIONS ARE AVAILABLE AT COUNSELING SERVICES, 3100 MICHIGAN
UNION, BEGINNING THURSDAY, JANUARY 30. DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS IS
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14. FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL 76-GUIDE (764-8433).
U-M is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer-

.
_..
I.
>.
ri

T
ti
3i
5+
.'
8
is
.

..
.
i
a
r
4
t
Y
D
4
tr
m+

F aust cal.
M"Jdsy-Frldy.: -m76m-G U IDE
Monday-Fridoy 5:OOpm-9:OOom Saturdoy-Sunday 24 hrs

\ henyou need to
talk, we're here
to listen."

t

U

The Office of International Programs
PRESENTS
C-I-IlIl1IED IMI I f" I" f"NI

I

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan