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February 05, 1992 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1992-02-05

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... . .

Page 2-The Michigan Daily- Wednesday, February 5, 1992

Iraqi terrorist
claims he was
used by U.S.

WASHINGTON (AP) - A de-
fector from an Iraqi-sponsored ter-
rorist network testified yesterday
that the U.S. government squeezed
him for informaion and then dis-
carded him. "I feel in this country I
am hostage," said Adnan Awad.
Appearing under extraordinary
security before a Senate panel, Awad
:described eight years of living un-
derground, the difficulties of learn-
ing a new language and adjusting to
an unfamiliar culture, and the pain of
separation from family and friends.
: He said he felt trapped because
for years he was denied residency
'status, and still doesn't have the
;1J.S. citizenship that would allow
him to start a new life in this
country. Awad said he has been
=treated "like of piece of paper going
in a basket.."
3 Awad, a 49-year-old Palestinian,
was recruited by the radical May 15
faction in 1982 to carry a bomb-
laden briefcase to Switzerland and
set it off in a major Geneva hotel. le
said the group's leader, Abu
ibrahim, blackmailed him into un-

dertaking the mission against his
will.
Speaking in broken English,
Awad said he couldn't go through
with the attack and surrendered him-
self to the U.S. Embassy in Geneva.
Current and former government
officials testified that Awad pro-
'They know Saddam
Hussein is involved,
but they don't want to
make him mad.'
- Adnan Awad
vided crucial testimony about his
friend Mohammed Rashid, which
led to his conviction earlier this
month in Greece of the 1982 bomb-
ing of a Pan Am airliner over Hawaii
in which one person was killed.
Awad also provided the FBI and
other government agencies with in-

Awa d
Howard Safir, formerly Associate
Director for the Marshals' Service,
suggested a separate program be de-
signed for special cases like Awad's.
The current program, he said, was
"overworked and overburdened" and
unable to cater to special language
and cultural needs.
Awad, gesticulating often with
his hands as his voice rose in frustra-
tion, said no amount of protection
from the Marshals' Service could
protect him if Iraq or its agents de-
cide to kill him.
Awad said he sleeps with a gun
under his pillow. He said his
brother's life was threatened when it
became known Awad would travel
to Greece to testify against Rashid.
His best protection, he said,
would have been U.S. citizenship so
he could travel at will and a credit
history so he could set himself up as
an independent entrepreneur.

SMOKING
Continued from page 1
Omega. "The Union is smoke-free
now except for a few sections. We
surveyed the students to see if they
would object if it went all the way."
Alpha Phi Omega conducted the
surveys in the Union Monday and
Tuesday, said MUBR Chair Priti
Marwah, an LSA junior.
"The issue has been put into
committee where they worked out
the details," Marwah said. "It is go-
ing to be brought back to the board
for either a vote or a return to com-
mittee (Wednesday). We are review-
ing the current policy, not coming
down hard on it."
Cianciola said a non-smoking
policy would not be without prece-
dent. "Three years ago, Michigan
implemented a non-smoking policy
in all buildings. At the same time,
the Union adopted a similar policy."
The Union is smoke-free except
for two sections in the MUG, identi-
fied smoking tables in the U-Club,
and the billiards room, Cianciola
said. When groups schedule meeting
rooms, the sponsor determines
whether the room will be smoking
or non-smoking, he added.
"In all instances, the non-
smoker's preferences will be first,"
Cianciola said.
"I can understand people not
wanting you to smoke around food,"
said LSA senior Chris Smith. "But a
lot of smokers hang around here. We
live in the MUG, like MUG-rats. It
will have a negative effect on their
business."

Little Caesar's Pizza employee Jayme Johnson takes a drag in one of the
two smoking sections of the MUG

Calvin and Hobbes

by Bill Watterson M
MGITo CAMS Mwants more state fundig

I TM( Th MAE TLE\SON-
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~ RFATJRE OF
-1992 Watterson/Oistrrburedby Unversa Press Syndcae

NOTICE NOWc .4I KEP M ( AN
OPEN . IOTiRT SIANUD
£t -RSpI LOML ,NWDI
I OONT USE ANY \SQiS

I TAKE A PAS\VE WMNtMkt
AND EXCTENDI\E S\NVT'To
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MRACSVNG s tUTnc DOAN .
FLIES .
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LANSING (AP) - Michigan's
school, from kindergarten to the
biggest universities, need a 5 percent
increase in state funding to stay
afloat, the head of the Michigan
Education Association said
yesterday.
"If the state does not recognize'
its responsibility, school districts
will be facing dramatic reductions
in staff and programs," said Julius

Maddox, president of the state's
largest teachers union.
Maddox emphasized that he
views the 5 percent figure as a min-
imum. "We are talking about the
bare minimum necessary to keep the'
doors of the state's school buildings
open," he said.
Gov. John Engler is scheduled to
outline his budget for the next fis-
cal year in a statewide television

presentation tonight. His budget di-
rector, Patricia Woodworth, will
release the details on Friday.
Engler is expected to present a
$7.7 billion budget. that would be
only about $100 million more than
the current budget. That would be
only about $100 million more than
the current budget. Last year, Engler
recommended a 4 percent increase
for schools.

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LANSING, Mich. (AP) -
Politicians used special office ex-
pense funds to pay for items such as
a gun used in a fire department raf-
fle, tuxedo rental, motivational
tapes and athletic tickets, records

',.

CASH FOR COLLEGE TUITION
Over 500 U of M students have requested info on money available.
But we haven't heard from you? Funds are limited. Call toll free or
write for free info today:
American Scholarship Association
PO Box 24026 Cleveland, Ohio 44124
1-800-554-4525 " 8 AM-8 PM, Mon-Sat
Application Deadline: February 28

Mich. politicians use private "
donations for gifts and gas

reviewed Monday showed.
The officeholder expense funds
(OEFs) are made up of private dona-
tions to pay for items taxpayer-
funded expense accounts don't
cover. They were established to pay
for expenses "incidental to holding
public office."
Probably the most common use
for the OEFs is mileage reimburse-
ment for gas needed to travel from
legislative districts to the Capitol,
a review of some reports showed.
Lawmakers' regular expense
funds only cover one round-trip per
week.
They also used the money to pay
for meals with staff and con-
stituents, staff gifts and parties,
Michigan flags, flowers and other
gifts for voters, and office decor,
coffee and magazine subscriptions.
Other frequent usages are for
colleagues' fund-raisers and dona-
tions to charities and local organi-
zations, and lots of travel to"out-of-
state legislative functions.
Officeholders were required to
file their reports with the

Department of State's elections of-
fice by Friday for the 1991 calendar
year.
Ilouse Speaker Lewis Dodak, D
Birch Run, donated $42 for the Miss
Bay County Scholarship Pageant and
$137 in juices for Operation Desert
Storm.
Dodak also reimbursed his home-
town volunteer fire department, in
Saginaw County's Taymouth
Township, $535 for a gun they used
as a raffle prize.
"Every year I give them a dona-
tion," Dodak said. "Some years it's
cash, some years the prize. I usually
give-them an option."
He said it was the township offi-
cials' idea to have an anniversary gun
as a prize, and that he never actually
saw it. One year the department had
a side of beef as a prize.
Other Dodak expenditures in-
cluded $2,282 for special stationery
with a gold emblem.
"The gold seals are fairly expen-
sive and I didn't want to do it at
state expense," he said.

Come see the

MICHIGAN WOLVERINES
play here at Scorekeepers!

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NEWS Henry Goldblatt, Managing Editor
EDITORS David Rheingold, Bethany Robertson, Stefanie Vines, Kenneth Walker
STAFF: Lan Barager, Barry Cohen, Ben Ded, Lauren Dermor. Erin Einhorn. Rene Huckle, Andrew Levy, Robin Litwin ,Travis
McReynolds, Josh Meckler. Rob Patton. Melissa Peerless. Karen Pier, Mona Qureshi. Karen Sabgir, Gwen Shaffer, Purvi Shah,
Jennifer Siverberg, David Wartowski, Chastity Wilson.
OPINION Yael Citro, Geoff Earle, Amitava Mazumdar, Editors
STAFF, Matt Adler. Jenny Alix. Daren Hubbard, David Lehtner, Jennifer Mattson. An Rotenberg, Dave Rowe, David Shepardson,
Daniel Stewart.

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ARTS Elizabeth Lenhard, Michael John Wilson, Editors
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(Weekend etc), Annette Petniso (Music).
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Davis, Gabriel Feldberg, Rosanne Freed, Lynn Geiger, Forrest Green Ill, Aaron Hamburger, Jonathan Higgins, Nima Hodaei, Roger
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Ratner, Jeff Rosenberg. Christine Slovey, Kevin Stein. Scott Sterling, Alissa Strauss. Josh Worth. Kim Yaged
PHOTO Kristoffer Gillette, Kenneth J. Smoller, Editors
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