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January 28, 1992 - Image 10

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1992-01-28

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Page 10- The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, January 28, 1992

HOCKEY NOTEBOOK
by Josh Dubow
Daily Hockey Writer
Last Saturday's contest against Ohio State was the
second consecutive and third overall sellout for the
Wolverines. The crowd of 7,602 was the biggest of the
season for Michigan, topping the season opener against
Michigan State by 61 fans.
The Wolverines will be going for their fourth and
fifth straight sellouts this weekend against Lake Supe-
rior. Tickets still remain, but the Athletic Department
expects the tickets to sell out before game time.
Attendance for the Wolverines is up dramatically
this year, with the average crowd at 6,085 as opposed to
4,775 last season.
GOALTENDING: Michigan coach Red Berenson
has not decided who will play between the pipes this
weekend. In the previous series against Lake Superior,
Steve Shields started both games for the Wolverines,
but Chris Gordon relieved Shields in the third period
of the second game.
Laker coach Jeff Jackson should not have a diffi-
cult decision in picking his goaltender. Junior Darrin
Madeley leads the CCHA and NCAA in goals against.
average. Madeley allows 2.03 goals per game and
boasts a 13-3-2 record. Madeley won both games
against the Wolverines in Sault Ste. Marie, including a
shutout in the Saturday contest.

Wolverine faithful
flocking to Yost
LAKER DOMINANCE: Lake Superior has domi-
nated the series with Michigan. The Lakers hold a 31-
10-5 all-time mark against the Wolverines and have*
posted a 10-1-5 record over the last four seasons. The
only Michigan victory in that span came last season at
the Soo when the Wolverines knocked off the Lakers.
Patrick Neaton's goal 37 seconds into the overtime
gave the Wolverines a 4-3 victory.
SOPHOMORE ..JINX?: Michigan center Brian
Wiseman has disproved the theory of sophomore
jinxes. Last season, Wiseman was the CCIIA Rookie-
of-the-Year, and he has picked up where he left off.
Wiseman has recorded a point in 20 of the last 210
contests, including his hat trick Saturday against Ohio
State. During the streak, Wiseman has tallied 14 goals
and dished out 29 assists.
IN THE POLLS: After last weekend's sweep
against Ohio State, Michigan jumped up two spots in
the Albany Times Union College Hockey Top 10 poll
to No. 4. The Wolverines trail Maine, Minnesota and
Lake Superior, respectively.
The Black Bears remain in the top spot in the nation
despite losing Friday to Northeastern.
HOME SWEET HOME: Michigan has a 19-game
unbeaten streak at Yost dating back to Dec. 14, 1990
against Lake Superior when the Wolverines fell to the
Lakers, 4-3.

PAUL TAYLOR/Daily
Michigan goaltender Chris Gordon makes one of his 35 saves against the Buckeyes Saturday night. The
Wolverines won, 9-3, sweeping the weekend series. Gordon may face Lake Superior State next weekend.

-,~ I I

Summer in Boulder, Colorado. Who can
describe it? You won't want to miss it.
Here's your chance to make the summer of
'92 one you'll always remember.
Think community. The Boulder campus
takes on a special quality in the summer.
Faculty come to class in shorts. Small
discussion groups meet under the trees on
the lawn. You find yourself part of a
comfortable learning community-who
work, study, or just relax together.
Think challenge. Choose from over 500
courses, including archaeological field
study in Steamboat Springs, production
with the Colorado Shakespeare Festival, an
intensive Spanish institute, a biology field
course on plants of Colorado, performance
with the Colorado Lyric Theatre festival,
and much more.
Think money. Tuition in the summer is
lower than during the following academic
year.

Think outdoors. Colorado has more than
1,000 spectacular peaks soaring above
10,000 feet and 53 peaks over 14,000 feet.
Boulder has parks, open space, and hiking
and biking trails galore. Boulder is the place
to be outdoors
Term A: June 8-July 10
Term B: July 14-August 14
Term C: June 8-July 31
Term D: June 8-August 14
Shorter, intensive courses also available
Call or mail the coupon for a free CU-
Boulder Summer Session Catalog, which
contains everything you need to know
about special courses, registration, housing,
tuition and fees, financial aid, student
services, and class schedules.
For information, call (303) 492-2456.

'Work in Uwa inton
Who to contact and What to Say
to get a job in Washington
Send $24.95
(check or money order) to:
Washington Job Network
P.O. Box 1080
Washington. D.C.20013-1080

THE
DAILY
CLASSIFIDS

0I

Yes, send me the free 1992 CU-Boulder Summer Session Catalog.
Name
Address
ty Sate Zip
Date of Birth Social Security Number*
020
Mail To:
Office of Admissions . Regent Administrative Center 125 * Campus Box 30
University of Colorado at Boulder - Boulder, CO 80309-0030
*-Fr record-keeping and identification ofstdents only
(303) 492-2456
Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Institution

. r j1l1Y11 . . .Gl1 -j O
The Spring/Summer Semester
Might Begin In May,
But The Spring/Summer
Financial Aid Process
Ends In January.
Spring/Summer Financial Aid Deadline
January 31, 1992
Please mail or deliver applications to:
The Office of Financial Aid
2011 Student Activities Building
Office Hrs: MTWF 8:15-Noon & 1-4 pm,
Thur 10-Noon & 1-4 pm
If you have any qu ftions, call 763-6600
I____WHLi

PET CAREAL KAN

I

&

0 C O L g l
F
U Ln
EETH8L- M

1. Mars, Incorporated is ...
A. A privately owned, multi-billion
dollar, global company Uti
B. #1 worldwide in confectionery
products, pet food and rice
C. Producer of five of the top ten
confectionery products in the U.S.
D. Looking for bright, motivated
individuals, interested in another
way of doing business
E All of the above

goe is, Inc.
RNATIONA L

I N T E

Information Services International

MARS eLEcTAOflics

i

ATTENTION MBA STUDENTS
Our Representatives will be on campus
recruiting for a full-time Commercial position

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