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January 24, 1992 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1992-01-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan
Wolfie is resurrected to host a:

by Diane Frieden

"Did Salieri really do it?"
This question, among others,
will be answered by Amadeus him-
self, complete with high-pitched,
Tom Hulce-like laugh, at the 1992
Michigan Mozart Piano Compe-
tition. Sponsored by Wilfried R.
Hildebrandt and Ford Motor Com-
pany, the event is capping off the
200th anniversary of Mozart's
death, where thirteen School of Mu-
sic pianists will perform several of
Mozart's complete works.
Primarily, Hildebrandt wanted
to continue the celebration of Mo-

zart's music that has been going on
world-wide for the past year. "I
like his music, and this competition
is different - Mozart with a twist
- since he will appear," said
Hildebrandt.
Indeed, Wolfgang will be there
to present the prizes and congra-
tulate the winners. lie also will
talk about "controversial issues,
like grand versus forte piano,"
Hildebrandt said.
A former pianist himself,
Hildebrandt was a University stu-
dent on a three-year wrestling
scholarship. He worked under Cliff
Keen, who himself had spent 45

who what where when

Picasso searched all over Spain for models who looked exactly like the
subjects of this oil on canvas work, Two Girls Reading. (1934)
Picasso teams
up with Gris

The New York Times Magazine
said, "Everywhere he looks, he sees
the high and haughty giving short
shrift to the humble America, and
John Mellencamp is in a slow
burn." Yup. That's why his
Midwestern tinged music is so
powerful. Though Mellencamp is
aging at a rapid rate, his real rebel
rocker stance has never faded. He is
on the road for the first time since
going on hiatus to be a painter.
Mellencamp's live show is as grip-
ping as his persona and a must-see
concert experience. He plays tonight
and tomorrow at the Palace of
Auburn Hills. Tickets are $25 and
available for both nights at
TicketMaster. Call 763-TKTS.
You've read the books, now be a
part of them on stage! The Univer-
sity Children's Theater will soon be
performing Stories of Dr. Seuss,
and the auditions are coming up
soon. Sign up to audition Monday
and Tuesday in the Green Room of
the Frieze Building. Oh, the roles
you'll play!

years in the position of w
coach at the University. De
the event to Keen, recently d
was an afterthought, but
brandt felt indebted to the m
helped with his scholarship a
cation.
With the 1992 comp
Hildebrandt wanted to in
more of Ann Arbor's stude
to the community, as well
something to the student
selves. As an incentive, thes
will be vying for $600 i
RECORDS
Continued from page 8
the new "Suzie Lighting" di
and on, endlessly repeating
low chorus. Unique songs
past about apocalyptic sh
malls or addressing Gorba
replaced on this album by t
nary clichds of "Heartache
Here" and "Searching
Heart."
The biggest problem w
music on Mr. Bad Exampl
too much is written and pl
Zevon himself or others just
ing as he. Apparently, he's b
return to the plain, straigh
rock style of his early care
can see why he wasn't very
in those days.
On past albums, Zevon'
was spruced up by numerou
appearances (Chick Corea
Kaukonen, Jerry Garcia, Neil
David Gilmour and others
Bad Example features the
sive" guitar playing of
Wachtel, perhaps the flatt

by Maureen Janson
Pablo Picasso once said, "Painting
is stronger than I," but not many
artists have had more influence on
our perception of art than Picasso. A
grand representation of his strength
arrives at the University Museum
of Art in the show Picasso and
Gris: Loans from the Carey Walker
Foundation. The exhibit covers
M~iore than four decades of the
artist's work
The display features ten colorful
Picasso oils ranging from the ideal-
istic "Seated Nude" (1922), to the
linear "Bullfight" (1934) and the
multi-stylistic "The Artist"
(1963). Also on loan is a collection
of Spanish paintings which features
a work entitled "Seated Harlequin"
(1923) by Picasso compatriot, Juan
Gris.,
Several events it the Museum
will highlight the opening of Pi-
casso and Gris, including a lecture
to be delivered by museum director
William Hennessey. He will dis-
cuss how our views of art have been
drastically changed by the lives and
work of these revolutionary Spanish
artists.
Also scheduled is an interdisci-
plinary evening program, A n
Evening with Pablo and His Friends,
which will feature dance, music, art
and drama influenced by Picasso and
his colleagues. Jessica Fogel and Gay
Delanghe of the University's Dance
Department will perform dances in-
spired by Picasso's Reclining Nude

(1934) and Two Girls Reading
(1934).
Francoise Gilot is a solo dance
created by Fogel. In it she will re-
flect her own studies of Francoise
Gilot, painter and mistress to Pi-
casso for ten years. The dance is set
to the music of Erik Satie, also of
the Dance Department.
To weave the evening together,
texts of Jean Cocteau, Guillame
Apollinaire, Max Jacob, and Picasso
himself will be read by Leigh
Woods of the University's Depart-
ment of Theater and Drama. A re-
ception with wine, sherry and tapas
(Spanish hors d'oevres) will
follow the performance.
The celebration of Picasso and
Gris:. Loans from the Carey Walker
Foundation will continue at the
Museum. Paintings will be on view
and more events will be presented
over the next three years.

Mellencamp

ChannelZ
In the mood for a little vigi-
lante action-drama-family hu-
mor? Personal revenge is
tonight's theme with In Broad
Daylight (9 p.m., NBC), a movie
starring has-beens Brian Dennehy
and Cloris Leachman. The pair
compensates for their police
force's inadequacies (sound famil-
iar?) and fight the neighborhood
bully themselves.
During those long commercial
breaks, you can switch to Baby
Talk (9 p.m., ABC). James duels a

Save the LP!
DAILY ARTS
I..

IAfT Ann Arbor Civic Theatre
Second Stage Productions
the death and life of-
SNEtAKY
A farcical
western
tragedy

Sun.
Mon.

Jan.

The Univ
SCHI

26

n Daily - Friday, January 24, 1992 - Page 9
piano contest
restling money (half of the award was put
dicating up by Hildebrandt and the other
eceased, half was matched by Ford).
Hilde- "I heard so much great piano
nan who playing.. at the University, and I
and edu- thought it was a nice way to ei-
courage young artists," said Hilda-
etition, brandt.
troduce
nt talent THE 1992 MICHIGAN MOZART
as give PIANO COMPETITION will #e
s them- held at the Recital Hall in tie
students School of Music, on Sunday at 1
n prize p.m. Admission is free.
most mechanical guitarist in recent,
memory.
The only guest on the album ts
brone on Dwight Yoakam, who sings har-
a sal- mony on "Heartache Spoken Here.",
of the Unfortunately, Yoakam makes thie
hopping song sound like any number of coun-
chev are try rock tunes and is representative
he ordi- of the bland, timeworn feel of the
Spoken record.
For A Don't be too quick to call Zevon
a has-been, however. The title track
with the and "Things To Do In Denver When
e is that You're Dead" are fresh and hilari-
ayed by ous barbs at greedy and selfish peo-
t as bor- ple, showcasing Zevon's true humor.
rying to Both songs are played with an ex-
ht-ahead citement that's lacking on the rest
er. One of the album, especially the title
popular track.
Unfortunately for Zevon, most
s music people don't rush out to buy albums
us guest with only two good songs on them.
, Jorma Don't worry, though. You'll have
Young, ample opportunity to have your
). Mr. pocketbook exploited when the
"exclu- songs are inevitably released on a
Waddy "Greatest Hits" album.
est and -Jeremy Lechtzin
ersity of Michigan
COL OF MUSIC
Mozart Solo Piano Competition
For undergraduate and graduate pianists at the
University of Michigan
Co-sponsored by Wilfried Hildebrandt and
Ford Motor Co.
School of Music Recital Hall, 1:00 p.m.
Michigan Chamber Players
Beethoven: Quintet for Piano and
Winds, op. 16 with Louis Nagel, piano;
Harry Sargous, oboe; John Mohler, clarinet;
Richard Beene, bassoon; and Lowell Greer
horn
Kodaly: Duo for Violin and Cello, op. 7
with Stephen Shipps, violin, and Erling
Blondal Bengtsson, cello
Brahms: Sonata no. 2 for Violin and Piano
in A Major, op. 100 with Hamao Fujiwara,
violin, and Katsurako Mikami, piano
School of Music Recital Hall, 8 p.m.
Dance Lecture/Demonstration
"Reconstruction of a Masterwork:
Martha Graham's Diversion of Angels"
by Peter Sparling assisted by the
University Dance Company
Co-sponsored by the Dance Department and
the Institute for the Humanities and in
conjunction with "Max Waldman: Images of
the Dance," a photo exhibit in the Power

Center Green Room
Power Center for the Performing Arts, 8 p.m.
University Symphony and
Philharmonia Orchestras
Donald Schleicher and Gary Lewis,
conductors
Brahms: "Tragic Overture"
Ravel: "Rapsodie Espagnole"
Mozart: Overture to The Magic Flute
Barber: "Medea's Meditation" and "Dance of
Vengeance"
Hill Auditorium, 8 p.m.
Ethel V. Curry Distinguished
Lecture in Musicology
by Bruno Nettl, University of Illinois
"An Ethnomusicologist's Excursions in the
Heartland"
Blanche Anderson Moore Hall, 4 p.m.
Jazz Combos in Concert
Ed Sarath, director
Tickets: $2
North Campus Commons, 8 p.m.
Male Voice Day Concert
U-M Men's Glee Club
Jerry Blackstone, director
First Methodist Church, 4 p.m.
University of Michigan
Brass Quintet
Christopher McCourry, trumpet; Armando
Ghitalla, trumpet; Lowell Greer, french
horn; Daniel Harris, trombone; and Fritz
Kaenzig, tuba
School of Music Recital Hall, 4 p.m.
Faculty Piano Recital by
Ar~ r rraa

PICASSO AND GRIS: LOANS romantic rival in the true spirit of directed by Thom Johnson
FROM TIE CAREY WALKER '90s violence - in the gym. Thursdays thru Saturdays at 8 p.m.
FOUNDATION will be on display at January 30-February 15, 1992
the University Museum of Art in the5
20th Century Gallery beginning this DAILY ARTS SEZ: Tickets $7-Thursdays two-for-one
Saturday. A free lecture, Picasso Support Campus Cinema The Ann Arbor Civic Theatre
for the Family, will be held at theret
museum Saturday at 10:30 a.m. An Call 662-7282 for tickets
opening reception free to Museum
of Art Friends will be held from S to _________________ I
7 p.m.. Memberships can be pur-
chased for $35, $15 with student ID. a
Call 747-2064 for more information. 9

Jan.27

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