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January 23, 1992 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1992-01-23

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The Michigan Daily - Thursday, January 23, 1992 - Page 7

Duderstadt chooses
recipients of Initiative

Women's political caucus
holds inaugural meeting
Group calls on women to become politiaiy involved

4

4I

Fund grant money
by Melissa Peerless Beth Adler, an organizational
Daily Administration Reporter consultant at the Student
University President James Organization Development Center
Duderstadt has chosen thirteen stu- and a member of the committee
dent proposals to receive University which helped oversee the program,
funding through the Presidential said organizers were pleased with
Initiative Fund for the Michigan the proposals.
Mandate Leadership and Learning "I think that 75 applicants is
!Student Competition. good for the first year. There were
The Presidential Initiative Fund amazing ideas. They were ingenious.
is Duderstadt's $100,000 yearly al- I wanted to fund all of them," she
lowance - donated by alumni - said. "Some programs involved
which he can use for University working with similar groups, or
causes at his discretion. groups working together who
Duderstadt designated this year's would not usually work together.
fund for the competition. Student The ideas were really cool."
proposals on how the University Adler said she hopes the
could further complete the goals of University will sponsor another
the Michigan Mandate were so- student contest and a faculty con-
icited during the summer and fall. test next year.
The Mandate is the University's However, Director of
commitment to increase minority Presidential Communications
enrollment and retention. Shirley Clarkson said the
University administrators said they University hasn't made a decision
hoped the competition would in- yet.

crease student interest in achieving
it$ goals.
"The key to the success of the
Mandate is involving people, not
ust a few people at the top or scat-
tered groups, but everyone. We have
to get people involved in the pro-
gram, to bring in the intellectual
community on these key social is-
sues," Duderstadt said.
A team of 12 students, faculty
and staff members chose the 13 pro-
posals from 75 submitted propos-
als.
The proposals were selected
'*ased on their ability to bring about
social and cultural diversity and de-
velop inter- and intra-cultural un-
derstanding and awareness.

"We are coming to the end of the
fund which made this program pos-
sible, so we don't know if it's going
to be possible to have another next
year or a faculty staff competition,"
she said.
The following programs re-
ceived funding:
De Colores: A Collection of
Writing from People ofAll Colors, a
collection of family stories written
by students;
i Salsa Explosion!!, a program
designed to address issues in the
Latino community;
Parallel Motion, a diverse
singing group;
Pi Lambda Epsilon Fraternity
Outreach Groups, a series of pro-

Duderstadt
grams which benefit local youth and
international students;
U-M Greens' Detroit
Summer, a speaker series;
Student National Medical
Association Community Service
Program, a local chapter of a na-
tional organization dedicated to mi-
nority needs;
Michigan Journal of Political
Science 's Perspectives on Diversity
at the University of Michigan, a
publication of up to 20 essays and
papers;
A Forum for Campus Leaders
in a Multicultural Community, a
program to promote a comfortable
environment for the exchange of
ideas on campus;
Race, Poverty and the
Environment, a seminar series;
Women of Color at the U-M,
a project to address the needs of
women of color on campus;
Projects of Unification 92-93,
a conference that will foster cul-
tural understanding on campus;
Institutionalized Racism: A
Multimedia Presentation, a piece
that will explore the concept of in-
stitutionalized racism, and;
Dewey Community Center
Club, an enrichment program at a K-
8 magnet school in Detroit.

by Joshua Meckler
Daily Staff Reporter
Speakers at last night's meeting
of the Ann Arbor Women's
Political Caucus (AAWPC) called
on women to become involved in
politics and bring women's issues
- such as reproductive choice - to
the forefront of today's political
agenda.
About 50 people attended the in-
augural meeting in the Rackham
East Lecture Room, where several
woman politicians from around the
state spoke.
State Representative Jan Dolan
(R-Farmington Hills), said women
are underrepresented in the state
government. Women hold only two
senate positions and 19 representa-
tive spots, she said.
"We do not represent the break-
down of women in Michigan. I
think it's meetings like this that can
encourage more women to be in-
volved," Dolan said.
Carol Miller, acting chair of the
AAWPC and a graduate student in
the School of Public Health, said,
"We're looking forward to being an
active group in the state of
Michigan - to get women into of-
fice and let the political leaders of
Michigan know what's important

to us."
The Ann Arbor organization, the
state's only local women's caucus,
is a branch of the Michigan
Women's Political Caucus
(MWPC), which is in turn a branch
of the National Women's Political
Caucus, Miller said.
Rosemary Wells, treasurer of
the MWPC, said, "The main pur-
pose of the caucus at the state and
national level is to elect women to
office."
However, Wells added, this is
difficult because women do not have
the same access to money that men
traditionally have had. "Money
talks, and that is the key to every
election."
She said the formation of the
AAWPC was a positive step. "A
caucus at the local level can really
do more intense work than a state-
wide caucus that is spread really
thin."
Marcella Stein, co-chair of the
MWPC, said, "I know here in Ann
Arbor you're going to do well be-
cause you have such a wonderful his-
tory of doing things so well when it
comes to protesting and doing
things political."
Because the meeting fell on the

19th anniversary of the Roe v. Wade
decision, much of last night's talk
centered on the topic of abortion.
Miller said reproductive rights
will be an important issue for the
organization. She added that all the
Women's Political Caucus groups
support only pro-choice candidates.
LSA first-year student Julie
Ballin said after coming to the
meeting that she was ready to join
the group. She said she was im-
pressed that reproductive rights
were given a high priority by the or-
ganization.
"I think it has to be because it's
more than abortion - it's the gov-
ernment telling women what they
can and can't do," she said.
Ann Arbor resident Christian
Arandel was the sole male attendee.
"I think it's important for men
to see what women have to say.
Only women raise the issues because
they pay the consequences. So men
aren't attracted to this kind of meet-
ing because they don't feel it con-
cerns them, but it should," he said.
The next AAWPC meeting will
be Wednesday, Feb 19, at 6:45 p.m.
in the auditorium of the School of
Public Health's building one.

International summit discusses
alternatives to speed up Soviet aid

The Daily encourages its readers to voice their opinions.
All letters should be 150 words or less.
All op-ed pieces should be no more than 3,000 characters.
The editors reserve the right to edit all letters and columns for style and space.
Send all letters and columns to:
The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.

WASHINGTON (AP) - The
stage was set Tuesday for an emo-
tional debate involving the United
States, Europe and oil-rich Arab
kingdoms on how to speed food and
medicine to defeated Cold War en-
emies in the shattered Soviet Union.
"It's important that we send
them a message of hope," said Secre-
tary of State James Baker, who will
join President Bush in opening the
two-day foreign minister-level con-
ference yesterday at the State

Department.
Baker has stressed the aid sum-
mit would not be turned into a
pledging contest, with the partici-
pants topping each other with dona-
tions. The administration would be
delighted if the invited guests vol-
unteered sizable contributions, but
coordinating aid is the primary goal.
The administration also wants to
avoid having the modest U.S. pro-
gram, totaling $4.1 billion, become
a target if the 47 participating na-

tions conclude the wintertime food
situation is so dire relief must be
pyramided above existing levels.
.Baker, talking to reporters dur-
ing a picture-taking session with
Portuguese Minister of Foreign Af-
fairs Joao de Deus Pinheiro, said
there may be food shortages in some
areas of the 11 former Soviet re-
publics and not in others. "There's
been a certain amount of hoarding
going on," he said.

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GREENPEACE IS NOW HIRING AC-
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SPANISH TUTOR NEEDED. Native/bilin-
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Earn $6000-$8000 while building your
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WORK STUDY POSITIONS AVAIL-
ABLE: The 1st involves general lab work in
an automated lab for protein structure
analysis for 8-10 hrs./wk. Lab course &
analytical or organic chemistry required. All
chemistry lab helpful but not required. The
2nd position involves general office work,
word processing, data entry, errands, etc. Ex-
perience w/ a PC based word processor help-
ful but not required. Contact Dr. Andrews @
763-6285.
WORK STUDY POSITION
AVAILABLE. Office assistant at Kresge
Hearing Research Institute. For more info.
call 764-8110
BUSINESS SERVICES.
COLLEGE CLEANERS: 705 N. UNIVER-
SITY ST. Professional dry cleaning. Shirts.
662-1906.
SPRING BREAK PRICE-BUSTER
VACATIONS!
Jamaica, Bahamas including airfare, great
hotel, and much more from only $599. Buy
from the #1 name you trust for quality
vacations. Four Seasons 1-800-331-3136.

NITEWORD - Papers, reports, resumes,
presentations, graphics. Specials. (Answering
machine) 971-0427.
OFFICE PRODUCTS OUTLET: Largest
selection of used in Washtenaw, Livingston,
& Lenawee counties. 4-drawer files from
$39, chairs from $5, computer furniture from
$29, desks from $19, bookcases from $19,
IBM reconditioned Selectrics II from $159,
& much, much more. Free delivery. Call 313/
475-1130.
THE COMPLEAT EDITOR. Academic
articles, Books, Dissertations. 769-4390.
GOING PLACES
BROKE? GO NORTH! Spring break ski
get-away. $49-$69 nightly. Cheaper mid-
week rates. Includes cozy, log cabin lodging,
outdoor hottub and FREE ski trails and e-
quipment with coupon. 10 minutes from
Traverse City. 616-276-9502.
DON'T BE LEFT OUT IN THE COLD!!
Spring break trips to Daytona available. Call
Justin, 663-1694.
DON'T MISS OUT on a Spring Break of a
lifetime. Limited space left for Jamaica,
Cancun, & Florida. Reasonable prices. Call
741-8141 or 663-3292 for details.
LANSING RESIDENTS: Do you commute
to classes alone? Let's carpool. Call Carole
(517) 339-9405.
LAST CHANCE! SPRING BREAK!
Cancun, Bahamas, Paradise Island. Price
Guaranteed. Matt, 996-0816.
ORIENT SPECIALS: Tokyo fr. $887,
Taipei fr. $955, Hong Kong fr. $977,
Bangkok fr. $1068, Seoul fr. $994, Singapore
fr. $1052. Ask for Dan or Claudia. $129 or
$189 anywhere in USA on Continental
Airlines! Bring AMEX card & Contintental
voucher. Ask for Irene or Ann at REGENCY
TRAVEL 209 S. State, 665-6122.
SKI IN BRECKENRIDGE, COLORADO:
Spring Break. Amy 996-2648 or Tami 665-
1026.
SPRING BREAK: Acapulco fr. $509, Nas-
sau fr. $509, Freeport fr. $529, Cancun fr.
$459, Puerto Vallarta fr. $549, Aruba 'fr.
$749, Barbados fr. $619, Cozumel fr. $509.
Spring Break Reps. needed, Call Dan at
REGENCY TRAVEL 665-6122.

SPEND SPRING BREAK '92 IN
DAYTONA BEACH! $199. All oceanfront
rooms, call P.J. Tours 994-4711.
SPRING BREAK'92--CANCUN!!!
CANCUN!!!
Best prices on campus, from $199.
Limited space. Call now for details.
Call Mike 995-9054 or Roger 741-4429.
SPRING BREAK CAPITAL OF Fla.-
Panama City Bch. Within walking distance of
3 famous beach clubs! Call now for
reservations. The El Dorado 904-234-5842.
SPRING BREAK '92. Cancun or Bahamas.
Best prices, best hotels, best service,
GUARANTEED. Don't miss out on the best
time of your life. Call Jason at 741-8566
before it's too late!
STUDENT TRAVEL BREAKS AT
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Best European/Greece airfares, 663-4400
YOU'VE ONLY GOT ONE WEEK TO
LIVE! DO ITRIGHT! Spring Break in
Jamaica, Bahamas from $399. Incl. hotel,
air, transfers. Robin 668-6313 or 1/800/426-
7710.

MISCELLANEOUS
BOWLING: U.M. Bowling Club for both
men and women undergrad. Students recruit-
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ing experience necessary. Call 764-7023.
JUNE CLEAVER seeks Ward Cleaver.
Send Photo and/or brilliant essay to:
Wardsearch, c/o June, 1330 Hill St.
PLAY THE GAME.
Audition for CHESS January 26-29.
Call 763-1107 for details.
PREGNANT (4 MOS. OR LESS)? Safe fit-
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with prenatal care. Pays $160. 747-0147.
URGENT: WILL PAY $25 FOR UNUSED
Resident Advisor application packet. Call
769-0192
MUSIC
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Liberty. 665-8001. Lessons: pop, folk, blues,
rock and classical, not just guitars.
STUDENTS OF COLOR:
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Call 763-1107 for more information.
TICKETS
$$BIG DOLLARS FOR OHIO STATE/
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ANNOUNCEMENTS
IT'S YOUR MOVE.
Audition for CHESS January 26-29.
Call 763-1107 for details.
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IBM 386-33MHz COMPATIBLE. 120
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$595.
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HPII laser printer 875
MacIIs 1/60,5/40, 1950-4/100 2050
Super Buys on LapTops.

I

CLASSIFIEDS

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Classified Advertising
Department
is currently hiring
business-minded
freshpersons
sophomores
to work as Assistant
Account Executives.
Applications
available at the
$tudent Publications Bldg.
420 Maynard
Deadline: Fri., Jan. 24
MEDICAL ASSISTANT, part-time for
facility offering pregnancy termination,
gynecological care, family planning, veno-
puncture skills necessary. Send resume to
Health Care Clinic, 3012 Packard Rd., Ann
Arbor, 48108.
NATURALISTS
Working with school children in residential
environmental education program.
Employment from early March through mid-
June. Summer staff positions also available.
Salary plus room and board. Contact: Marvin
Berman, PhD., Tamarack Outdoor Education
Center, Ortonville, MI 48462. (313) 627-
E821
MIART-TIME TELEPHONE SALES, In-
ternational miarketing firm. Telephone ex-

NN

The Office of Misority Affairs

Student Laders
King/Chavez/Parks
SPRING VISITATION PROGRAM
Program dates are March 2, 1992 - May 29, 1992
An average of ten hours per week is required
$5.55-$6.55

II.

PUT AT&T
ON YOUR RESUME
1992 Spring & Fall Marketing Opportunity Available
AT&T is seeking an ambitious, sales-oriented student to
participate in a year-long on-campus marketing program selling
and promoting AT&T products and services. Must be
available 20 hours per week during both the current spring and
fall 1992 semesters. Great weekly salary, plus bonuses. Must
be available to start immediately. Job title and specifications
are as follows:
AT&T Student Campus Manager
To be responsible for overall implementation of on-campus
_- - --J _ - Ji l . __J _fI.AT r.'T

Office of Minority Affairs
OFFICE ASSISTANTS
Hiring for Winter Term
10-15 hours per week
$5.00 - $6.50

Diversity Program
ASSISTANT FACILITATORS
Hiring for Winter Term
10-15 hours per week.
$6.55-$7.55
If you are interested, and would like more information, please pick up an application

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