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January 22, 1992 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1992-01-22

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The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, January 22, 1992 - Page 7

Countries send aid to former Soviet Union

MOSCOW (AP) - A Pennsyl-
vania lottery millionaire chartered a
plane filled with medicine and food,
a German shipped her old furs and
the European Community is airlift-
ing thousands of tons of beef, butter
a d powdered milk.
Donors large and small world-
wide are helping the people of the
tormer'Soviet Union survive winter,
ind giving leaders in the newly in-
4ependent republics some breathing
room to enact painful economic and
political reforms.
On the eve of a 47-country con-
erence to coordinate assistance
flound for the former Soviet Union,
officials here are making plans to
Dandle the aid, stating their priorities
and assuring the West that the
donations won't be wasted.
Russia has already presented a
tentative wish-list for the two-day

conference that begins today in
Washington, Yevgeny Ivanov,
chairperson of President Boris
Yeltsin's newly established
humanitarian aid working group,
said.
The needs include 2.5 million
tons of meat, 1.5 million tons of
sugar, and lesser quantities of dry
milk, macaroni, cereals and edible
oils, Ivanov said in an interview
yesterday.
The government also wants
Western permission to auction off
much of the donated food to com-
mercial distributors so the proceeds
would be available to supplement
incomes of the neediest citizens, in-
cluding retirees, the disabled and
large families, he said.
According to Ivanov, handing out
Western food would mean much of
it could be stolen or wind up in the

wrong hands. Selling it gives offi-
cials more protection against waste
and fraud while still making the
products available to the public, he
argued.
The Russian government projects
54 million of its citizens will have to
be helped this winter because of sky-
rocketing prices, and shortages of
food and medicine.
Up to $5 billion in goods and
loans will be required to cover the
anticipated needs, Ivanov said. He
met later with Richard Armitage,
State Department coordinator for
humanitarian assistance to the
former Soviet Union.
He also promised tough measures
to combat theft of foreign donations,
although he acknowledged corrup-
tion and black marketeering are
prevalent in the food distribution
system.

Yesterday, the EC said Germany
alone has accounted for 57 percent
of the total aid to the former Soviet
Union, and German Chancellor
Helmut Kohl has asked other
countries to share the burden.
Moved by TV footage of a hun-
gry Muscovite, lottery winner Ken
Wayne of Erie, Pa., teamed with the
U.S. charity Americares. With a
$100,000 gift from Wayne, Ameri-
cares chartered a flight to Moscow in
December carrying 100 tons of
medicine and food. Wayne helped
unload the crates.
Ivanov described his favorite aid
example: a German person who sent
a boxload of furs to a Russian
orphanage.
"We were afraid to let the chil-
dren go outside in them, they could
get robbed," he said.

ENGLER
Continued from page 1
proposal deals withJ
education.
Sen. John Schwarz (R
Creek), co-chair of thel
Education Subcommittee, ex
that the Savings Bond prog
an "act uarily-sound" meansf
cuts to obtain money to sen
children through college. TI
posal provides zero-coupon
bonds with no intermediatei
fees, guaranteeing an amo
money when the bonds matu
For example, when the ch
years old, parents can inve
16-year College Savings
Upon the bond's maturity,l
will be guaranteed money f
child's higher education. F
will not pay interest on the b
til it matures.
"Engler's speech was a
action for the educational c
nity," Schwarz said. He ad
society has a certain respon
to ensure that people are p
with adequate skills to com
the job market.
Harry Grotrian, director
Financial Aid Office, agre
Schwarz's assessment.
"The Savings Bond Prog
a real potential of providin
needed relief for families of
income," Grotrian said.
ie explained that Engle
posal is an alternative for s
who are either marginallyt

or ineligible for need-based funds
for a higher education.
The money parents receive from
the program, he said, will not effect
higher their eligibility for need-based aid.
As a result, parents will be able to
-Battle secure a large portion of tuition
Higher funding from one source and use
plained College Savings Bonds to pay for
gram is the remaining portion.
for par- "This proposal is a strong mes-
id their sage from the governor's office to
he pro- encourage parental savings,"
bonds, Grotrian said.
interest Executive Director of University
ount of Relations Walter Harrison said "the
re. future of the state depends upon our
hild is 2 ability to create jobs and compete
est in a on the open market."
Bond. He added the the University is
parents grateful to Engler's administration
or their for its work to improve higher edu-
Parents cation in difficult financial times, to
ond un- prepare students for a competitive
future.
call to The program has not been for-
ommu- mally proposed to the state
led that legislature.
nsibility Engler's Michigan 2000 pro-
repared gram is meant to ensure that all stu-
ipete in dents will start school prepared,
while the essence of the Michigan
rof theEducational Warranty is that
ed with schools will guarantee the qualifica-
ram has tions of the students that they
innlyproduce.

R oe vs. Wade
A n n i v e r s a r y e v e n t s
Pro-choice rally, Ann Arbor Committee for Abortion
and Reproductive Rights (AACDARR)
Pro-life rally, Students for Life
Candlelight vigil, Students for Life
(Counter-demonstration by AACDARR)
52%25555 55595555555% 5 X.: a. eI lniWkisnuma

ABORTION
Continued from page 1
Network of Washtenaw County is
sponsoring "March for Life '92"
tonight. The march will leave from
Rackam at 6:30 p.m. and proceed to
the Washtenaw County Courthouse
where several pro-life activists will
be speaking.
Ann Arbor Committee to Defend
Abortion and Reproductive Rights
(AACDARR) is sponsoring a rally at
11 a.m. on the steps of the Union.
Several pro-choice activists will ad-
dress participants. AACDARR will
be counter-demonstrating the 6:30
p.m. pro-life march.
The first meeting of Ann Arbor's
Women's Political Caucas will take
place tonight from 6 to 8 p.m. in
Rackam East Lecture Room, 3rd
floor. The caucus will provide a fo-
rum for important women's political

issues from date rape to economic
equality.
Julie Loesch-Wiley of Feminists
for Life will speak on pro-life fem-
inism at Angell Hall Auditorium C
at 8 p.m. tomorrow.
On a national level, a massive
demonstration is expected outside
the Supreme Court building today.
The court was asked in compet-
ing appeals from Pennsylvania offi-
cials and abortion clinic operators to
say point blank whether Roe vs.
Wade remains the law of the land.
The court's brief order yesterday
was ambiguous. The justices said
they will study the Pennsylvania
law's provisions but did not say
flatly they will examine the 1973
ruling.
The Pennsylvania case will be
argued in April with a decision
expected by July.
-The Associated Press con-
tributed to this story

g nawiy
middle
r's pro-
students
eligible

Ann Arbor Women's Political Caucus
Fa Mi ,i
March for Life '92, Pro-Life Network
Julie Loesch-Wiley, Feminists for Life

Philip Cohen/DAILY GRAPHIC

.9

CLASSIFIED

ADS

* 0
, coming Feb 13 to The Michigan Daily
*
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Health BFi'tness.
* *
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.
. advertisement deadline: Monday, Feb. 3
*call 764-0554 today

HELP WANTED
SUMMER MANAGEMENT POSITIONS
4iVAILABLE TASP INTERNATIONAL is
looking for highly motivated college students
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earn $6000-$8000 while building your
tesume and gaining valuable business
experience. Territories are open accross the
State of Michigan, particularly in Gross Pt.,
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Orion, Livonia, Clarkston, and Ann
Arbor. Territories; arefilling quickly, for
more information call Gregg Merians. at 1-
2-543-3792.
THERAPY GROUP for females whose
parents recently divorced/seperated. 8-wk.
prog. for divorce issues. Low fee. Call U of
M Psych Clinic for appt. 764-3471.
VERSATILE MALE AND FEMALE
DANCERS with outgoing personalities wan-
td to form dance troup to perform with top
.bgnd at family oriented dinner parties. 885-
6490.
WORK STUDY POSITIONS AVAIL-
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an automated lab for protein structure
analysis for 8-10 hrs./wk. Lab course &
analytical or organic chemistry required. All
-chemistry lab helpful but not required. The
2nd position involves general office work,
#word processing, data entry, errands, etc. Ex-
perience w/ a PC based word processor help-
ful but not required. Contact Dr. Andrews @
763-6285.
~WORK STUDY POSITION
jZAILABLE. Office assistant at Kresge
aring Research Institute. For more info.
t tll 764-8110
BUSINESS SERVICES
COLLEGE CLEANERS: 705 N. UNIVER-
. SITY ST. Professional dry cleaning. Shirts.
62-1906.
i NITEWORD - Papers, reports, resumes,
presentations, graphics. Specials. (Answering
i Machine) 971-0427.
OFFICE PRODUCTS OUTLET: Largest
selection of used in Washtenaw, Livingston,
& Lenawee counties. 4-drawer files from
$39, chairs from $5, computer furniture from
$29, desks from $19, bookcases from $19,
IBM reconditioned Selectrics II from $159,
& much, much more. Free delivery. Call 313/
S475-1130.
SPRING BREAK PRICE-BUSTER
VACATIONS!
Jamaica, Bahamas including airfare, great
ihptel, and much more from only $599. Buy
t from the #1 name you trust for quality
vacations. Four Seasons 1-800-331-3136.
THE COMPLEAT EDITOR. Academic
articles, Books, Dissertations. 769-4390.
GOING PLACES
BE A PART OF THE LARGEST AND
. OST COMPLETE SPRING BREAK
TRIP AT UM. Cancun from $399, 7 days, 7
nights. Call Beach Club- 930-9993. Come to
the Beach Club's Spring Break party on
Wed., Jan. 22nd at Cactus Jacks on S. Univ.
* ll invited
BROKE? GO NORTH! Spring break ski
tget-away. $49-$69 nightly. Cheaper mid-
week rates. Includes cozy, log cabin lodging,
outdoor hottub and FREE ski trails and e-
quipment with coupon. 10 minutes from
javerse City. 616-276-9502.
DON'T MISS OUT on a Spring Break of a
lfetime. Limited space left for Jamaica,
Cancun, & Florida. Reasonable prices. Call
741-8141 or 663-3292 for details.
LANSING RESIDENTS: Do you commute
to classes alone? Let's carpool. Call Carole
,(517) 339-9405.
ORIENT SPECIALS: Tokyo fr. $887,
Taipei fr. $955, Hong Kong fr. $977,

GOING.PLACES

BREAK
THE
SPRING
IN A WAY
THAT YOU'LL
NEVER FORGET
AT FABLED
HEDONISM
IN
NEGRIL, JAMAICA
It's the Caribbean's ultimate all-
inclusive beach resort! One price
pays for everything-- meals, wine'
with lunch and dinner, all bar
drinks, disco and piano bar, live
entertainment, water skiing,
windsurfing, snorkeling and scuba,
tennis, horseback riding, workout
gym, sports instruction, hot tubs,
pools, gorgeous beach with all the
beach toys, airport transfers from
Montego Bay, deluxe hotel room,
all taxes and tips,
AND---) THE MOST
PARTY-INSPIRING, MEET
NEW FRIENDS, REGGAE
BEAT, RESORT
ATMOSPHERE ON THIS
PLANET!
After HEDONISM, Spring
Break will never be the same!!!
CARIBBEAN TRAVEL
(The Caribbean Spring
Break Specialists)
1-800-462-6033 9-6 pm EST

SPRING BREAK'92--CANCUN!!!
CANCUN!!!
Best prices on campus, from $199.
Limited space. Call now for details.
Call Mike 995-9054 or Roger 741-4429.
a= Need A Spring Break.
Treat Yourself To A
Barefoot Bahamas
Spring Break
The Ultimate Sailing Experience
Call 1.800.359.9808 Today 4 ',g

Walk Out of the M.K Dog Lectures
Wondering What's Nelt?
MIK Dg iaotght us a lo, but race reiatIons on ihis
campas deserve more of our attention!!
Whit./urp.m.n-American students are invited to
join wii Rfrican-Americen, Asian American, .tino/e,
.nd Notis. Americen studenes in forming intergroup
dialogues.
if you are interested.,piese attend en informational
session
Wednesday January 29, 1992 at 7 p.m. In tt Qusd
room 125

SPRING BREAK CAPITAL OF Fla.-
Panama City Bch. Within walking distance of
3 famous beach clubs! Call now for
reservations. The El Dorado 904-234-5842.
SPRING BREAK '92. Cancun or Bahamas.
Best prices, best hotels, best service,
GUARANTEED. Don't miss out on the best
time of your life. Call Jason at 741-8566
before it's too late!
STUDENT TRAVEL BREAKS AT
STAMOS TRAVEL
Best European/Greece airfares, 663-4400
YOU'VE ONLY GOT ONE WEEK TO
LIVE! DO ITRIGHT! Spring Break in
Jamaica, Bahamas from $399. Incl. hotel,
air, transfers. Robin 668-6313 or 1/800/426-
7710.
MISCELLANEOUS
BOWLING: U.M. Bowling Club for both
men and women undergrad. Students recruit-
ing new members. Friendly student or-
ganization looking for new faces. No bowl-
ing experience necessary. Call 764-7023.
PLAY THE GAME.
Audition for CHESS January 26-29.
Call 763-1107 for details.
PREGNANT (4 MOS. OR LESS)? Safe fit-
ness study needs you if healthy n-smoker
with prenatal care. Pays $160. 747-0147.
MusIC
HERB DAVID GUITAR STUDIO. Not just
guitars. 302 E. Liberty. 665-8001. Repairs.
Lessons: Pay 4, get 5.
STUDENTS OF COLOR:
Auditions for a Musical
Call 763-1107 for more information.
WANTED: Small practice bass guitar amp.
Call 665-2411.
TICKETS
$$BIG DOLLARS FOR OHIO STATE/
MICH. STATE basketball tickets. Trevor or
Brent 764-8865.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
IT'S YOUR MOVE.
Audition for CHESS January 26-29.
Call 763-1107 for details.

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