100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 19, 1991 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1991-11-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily- Tuesday, November 19, 1991 - Page 7

Voice of America to

'U' administrators do not expect

interview 'I
by Jim Schubiner
English Professor Bert
Hornback is scheduled to talk with
the international radio network
Voice of America about his readings
of Charles Dickens in a telephone
interview Nov. 25.
"We're interested in why the
work of Charles Dickens, particu-
larly A Christmas Carol, has be-
come an American tradition,"
Marilyn Silvey, a spokesperson for
aVoice of America said.
"We want to talk to the man
who perpetuates this American tra-
dition," she added.
Voice of America will ask
Hornback to comment on "Dickens'
message for the modern world and
what lessons we should learn from
his works," Silvey said.
Since 1976, Hornback has trav-
eled across the country with a read-
ing stand, a nineteenth-century-style
tuxedo, and a fake beard. Having
performed in more than 70 cities,
Hornback dresses up as Charles
The Office
Study Abro
Summer
Tuesday, No
This summer bring!
Spain. Students w
ing Spanish in Sala
200, or 300 level. P
new opportunity.

I' prof.
Dickens and reads from his novels
for audiences in theaters, hospitals,
and schools.
Hornback has picked up where
Dickens left off. Dickens began pub-
lic readings for charities before
turning professional in 1858, most
often performing The Trial from
Pickwick and A Christmas Carol.
By his death in June 1870, Dickens
had made 472 public performances.
Hornback begins his readings
with comments by Dickens, cover-
ing topics that Dickens himself once
discussed: greed, corruption,.
poverty, generosity, and love.
Dickens also believed that
"Christmas doesn't belong to
Christians alone," Hornback said.
Once Hornback's beard and
tuxedo are in place, he finds it diffi-
cult to be himself. Audience mem-
bers often ask question about
Hornback or Dickens, but he has
problems reverting back to his real-
life identity as a professor and
Dickens scholar. Hornback does con-

by Henry Goldblatt
Daily Administration Reporter
Administrators say they are
skeptical that the University will
receive approximately $25 million
in state funding owed from the last
fiscal year.
However, Bill Kerans, deputy di-
rector of the State's Department of
Management and Budget said the
University "will get every bit of
the money they were promised."
Since the University and state
fiscal years differ, the two parties
worked out a payment schedule in
1983 in which the state pays the
University the majority of the ap-
propriation during the first nine
months of the state's fiscal year -
Oct. 1 to June 30. This ensures that
the University is paid the bulk of
the appropriation during its fiscal
year which ends June 30.

In the state's 1991 fiscal year,
the state paid the University 91 per-
cent of its appropriation in the first
nine months of the state's fiscal
year. However, due to budget cuts,
'We may not see it
until the economy
turns ... we may never
see it
- James Duderstadt
University President
the state deferred the remaining 9
percent of the appropriation -
approximately $25 million - to
the state's fiscal year 1992.
Kerans said to supplement this
shortfall the state is paying the
University 100 percent of its 1992
appropriation between October and
June.

to see $25 million owe

I by state
However, Deputy Director of the
University Department of Man-
agement and Budget Bob Moeneart
said the University will still be
short $25 million because although
the University is receiving 100 per-
cent of its funding in nine months, it
will not be receiving the additional
9 percent it is owed from last fiscal
year.
University officials say they Ore
doubtful the money will be repaid.
"We may not see it until the
economy turns ... we may never see
it," said University President James
Duderstadt in an interview egriier
this month.
Moenart said University.;de
partments are being told to exercise
caution in budget-making and spend-
ing, "We are being very cautious in
our spending and are being directed
to be frugal in every respect."

Hornback
cede that "when reading in London I
felt like a fraud playing Dickens ... I
knew that I wasn't him."
"It's scary," Hornback said in
reference to Dickens' "marvelous
but dangerous power to move
people."
The interview will air just prior
to Christmas and will be broadcast
in up to 40 different languages
throughout the world.

of International Programs
ad Information Meetings
in Salamanca, Spain
vember 19, 1991, 4:00 pm
B124 M LB
s a new location to the summer program in
ill earn 6-8 in-residence credits while study-
manca. Courses will be offered at the 100,
lease join us today to learn more about this

ROSE
December
YOU

BOWL PACKAGE
r 29, 1991- January 2, 1992
from $919.00
R PACKAGE INCLUDES:

4

** Roundtrip airfare from Detroit to Los Angeles.
**4 nights hotel accommodations.
"Reserved seats at the Rose Bowl game (End Zone location).
"Reserved grandstand seats for the Tournament of Roses Parade.
"Transportation to parade and game and return, with special
reserved bus parking.
Box Luncheon on January 1.
"City sightseeing tour of Hollywood, Beverly Hills, and Los Angeles,
including a stop at Farmer's Market.
"Viewing of float construction.
"All applicable taxes.
"Service of experienced tour managers.
f FOR DETAILS CONTACT:
AMERICAN EXPRESS TRAVEL
200 RENAISSANCE CENTER
DETROIT, MI 48243
-x1-313-259-5030 OR 1-800-YES-AMEX

i ii
s
t
x
.. :*
n,
k.
+. ..
,.
z j " Rr w. e
i, r
t x
rJ t
1 !
. .

-Y~J w

I_

MSA NEWS: SPECIAL Produced by MSA Communications
Chair: Brett White
ELECT O N EDIT O NVice-Chair:Melissa Saari
ELETIN EIT O NStaff: Meghan Carey, Tom Hm

1

.

1

MIL

t M- M - - t ImLE awl

"m * - Il . Ow - A A -

MICHIG~AN 5TIULIENTIA55MbI

NOVEMBER 5 & 25
MEETING SUMMARY

0.
0

" Gary Clark, chairperson of the Michigan Collegiate Coalition,
spoke on MCC's function of advocating student interest legislature
such as the Higher Education Bill.
" Stacy Leyton, VP of USSA, spoke about USSA's function of
advocating student interest legislature on a national level.
* President Green reported that the Union Policy has been modi-
fied to be more convenient and less intimidating. Also checking on
MCC funding controversy.
* Vice President Davies reported that she has mailed letters out to
other Universities around the country inquiring how they run their
student governments.
* Campus Governance appointed Ken Bartlette to the Intercollegiate
Athletic Board.
* Communications printed the MSA news, held pizza talks with
students in the dorms, and put out fliers.
* External Relations Chair David Englander reported on the MCC
conference he attended.
" Rules and Elections sponsored Code and Constitution changes.
" Academic Affairs wrote editorial to the Daily, reported on
Students Honoring Outstanding Undergraduate Teaching
(SHOUT) annual award, and summarized LSA's Planning Com-
mittee on the Undergraduate Experience recommendations for
curriculum change.
* Student's Rights issued a formal report on the South University
tear gassing incident. (Copies available in the MSA office)
" A referendum to allow students to vote on the MSA fee failed.
(10-12-3)
" An amendment to add MCC to the External Relations Committee
description passed unanimously.
* A referendum to allow the students to vote on a proposal to
combine 4 MSA commissions failed. (13-11-1) 2/3 vote needed.
* A resolution recommending that the State Department issue a
Visa to Perez passed. (11-7-2)
* Two proposals to remove discrepancies from the MSA Code
passed.
9 A resolution to encourage the Daily to publish MSA meeting

LY
MSA CANDIDATES WERE ASKED THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS:
1. WHAT DO YOU SEE AS THE CURRENT PROBLEMS WITH MSA, IF ANY? AND HOW DO YOU PLAN TO
SOLVE THEM?
2. CURRENTLY, WHAT ARE THE THE MAIN ISSUES MSA SHOULD BE ADDRESSING?
DAVID HOARD, INDEPENDENT FOR LSA
In taking on the role of student representative, MSA has done just that, represented the confusion and disillusionment of the students concerning the affairs of their
government. MSA serves a vital purpose in student life here at the university. Although there is great potential for positive change, the MSA has become another political
organization. MSA needs to collectively define their purpose and encourage constructive criticism rather than political warfare.
As a representative, I will make a close connection between the students and their elected officials. I believe it is the job of the students to determine what they want
from their representative. It is the job of a representative to learn what the students want.
ROBERT VAN HOUWELING, INDEPENDENT FOR LSA
MSA has a number of problems that cripple its effectiveness, but the most pressing are: (1) The lack of attendance at MSA meetings. At many MSA meetings there
is barely a quorum present - barely half of the representatives are showing up! Occasionally there isn't even this bare minimum, and consequently, no business can be
conducted. Vote for me, and I will show up. No arty can guarantee the consistent attendance of all its members. (2) The current assembly seems afraid to let studeits
decide its fate. On multiple occasions, leadrs of bth parties have rejected referenda allowing student choice on the fee and the commission structure. They don't truist
you, I will. (3) The loose commission structure that the parties won't let you change is also a problem. It allows commissions to be fiscally and politically unaccountable
to the assembly. Consequently, instead of reflecting views representative of all students, commissions become extremely radical or conservative pawns of their
membership.
The MSA needs to address the issues defined in my platform and attempt to solve the problems I have identified.
CHARLES R. SMITH, INDEPENDENT FOR KINESIOLOGY
A current problem I see with MSA is that it doesn't go to the students to see what the common issues are that need addressing. It seems that MSA relies on what they
hear from small groups of students who come to them. MSA should to out and listen to the silent majority instead of acting only on the vocal minority.
Presently, I feel that MSA should be addressing the following issues: First, the procedures that Ann ArborPoliceand Campus Security take in controlling student parties
on and off campus. Second, the current debate regarding the University of Michigan's policy concerning same sex-families. Also, MSA should try to devote more time
to the academic concerns that students have.
BRIAN KIGHT, INDEPENDENT FOR ENGINEERING
The current structure of MSA requires fundamental reform. The Assembly's largely decentralized committees and commissions need to be made more accountable
to the elected Assembly, as a whole. In the future, committees and commissions must be required to make bi-weekly written reports of their activities and to submit' a
concise action plan to the Steering Committee for approval. Commissions which duplicate the functions of other committees and commissions should be eliminated and/
or consolidated..0
The MSA must also reexamine its relationship with the Ann Arbor Tenant's Union and Student Legal Services. Both organizations takelargeportions of MSA'sbudget,
and the Assembly is responsible for their debts and financial obligations. The AATU and SLS, however, are excessively reluctant to allow Asmbly input into their
operations, and in the past, neither organization has managed money well. As long as the two organizations are connected with the MSA, they will be subject to MSA
plitics, which may not be in the best interests of their clients. Therefore, I propose that the university assume the administration of SLS, in manner similar to Health
rvices. SLS is already barred from taking part in any action against the University, so no conflict would exist under this arrangement. I also propose, that AATU becqme
an independent union, of tenants, for tenants, and by tenants, free from the interference of MSA. Like every other union in this country, the bulk of AATU's funds should
come directly from its membership rather than from the government.
M.S.A.'s primary concerns should be the problems of this campus and student's interests. All too often, the M.S.A. tries to solve the problem's of the entire world and
spreads its resources too thin. While the Peace and Justice Commission worries about the Baltic States, issues of student's rights here at the U of M get less attention. While
the Environment Select Committee spends time networking the activities of environmental organizations, the M.S.A. does little to examine the implications of wasle
dumps and incinerators on campus.
JOHN VANDENBERG, INDEPENDENT FOR ENGINEERING
When I became a representative two months ago, I entered the job with no planned agenda. To this day, I do not have one and do not want one. What I bring to M. .A.
instead is a strong sense of integrity, professionalism, and commitment. At all times I act in the best interests of the students I represent. My opinion of a given resolution
is based solely on its individual merits. I do not allow party lines or personal animosities to interfere with my duties. Attendance has not and will not be a problem with
me, Tuesday nights are reserved for weekly meetings. Lastly, I remain committed to improving M.S.A. as a student resource and as a student voice to the administration.
CONSERVATIVE COALITION, FULL PARTY SLATE
Since we gained the majorUty on MSA in thespring, CC has been working to eradicate many problems within MSA begun by the ineptitude of previous administrations.
While much progress has been made, there is much yet to change. Too many representatives still pursue their own personal agendas, rather than represent true student
concerns. MSA is also not the proper forum for political bickering, but must instead concentrate on providing student services. CC plans to continue our focus here on
campus acting on student concerns, rather than our personal agendas.
The focus for MSA must remain on campus, addressing student concerns. As others on the assembly have proposed, MSA should not be "demanding" anythink of
the U.S. State Department. The interests of the students are better served when MSA addresses issues as fiscal responsibility, the freedoms and rights of students and

II

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan