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November 18, 1991 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1991-11-18

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Page 2 -The Michigan Daily- Monday, November 18,1991

Legislative Record
How your national legislators voted on key issues this week
UNEMPLOYMENT: Congress passed a $5.2 billion bill to
provide extended benefits to jobless workers whose first
round of compensation has expired. The House passed the
bill, 396-30, while the Senate concurred, 91-2.
Sen. Carl Levin (D): yes. Sen. Donald Riegle (D): yes. Rep.
Carl Pursell (R): yes.
FAMILY LEAVE: The House voted, 253-177, to require
larger businesses to give employees unpaid leave to care for
newborn children or attend to other urgent family matters.
Pursell: no.
Source: AP

IE

CHIGAN

LILY

ANALYSIS
Continued from page 1
turnout.
Everywhere in New Orleans
this weekend and, no doubt, every-
where in Louisiana, people were
talking about politics.
At Mother's restaurant near the
border of New Orleans' French
Quarter, conversations were
buzzing right up until the polls
closed at 8 p.m. The report that Ed-
wards won was announced on the
television at that hour, and half of
the patrons cheered, and half were
silent.
In front of a supermarket in the
New Orleans suburb of Metairie,
an 18-year old Duke supporter
crossed paths with a Louisianan in
his riid-20s.
The 18-year-old said, "Ah, a fel-
low Dukester?"
The other replied, "Uh, no."
"That's all right. Good luck,"
the 18-year old said.
"Good luck," he said. That is
fitting. Louisiana is in bad shape
economically. Edwards has to im-
prove the economy while keeping
out of trouble, and avoiding the re-
call movement that has already
started. And the Duke presence
hasn't done much to improve race
relations in the state.
But Louisiana has one thing go-
ing for it: a new political aware-
ness born in a gubernatorial con-
troversy. Yes, like the young man
said, good luck, Louisiana. Your fu-
ture is waiting.

NEW
Continued from page 1
complaining about some of the
petty arguments in MSA and there
seemed to be a lot of issues that
weren't being addressed," said Cur-
tis Laitinen, an architecture graduate
student running as an independent.
"Instead of sitting back and com-
plaining or ridiculing, I decided to
try and spend a semester and get in-
volved myself."
Prior to the election, first-time
candidates said they had heard many
things about MSA, not all of them
positive.
"I've heard a whole gamut of
things ranging from condemnation
of MSA's ineffective process to re-
ally positive statements about
MSA's potential," said Jennifer
Collins, an independent candidate
and graduate student from the
School of Social Work. "From peo-
ple on MSA, I've heard it's tough
but rewarding."
Other candidates felt MSA's
reputation was fairly negative, due
in part to personal experiences stu-
dents have had with the assembly in
the past.
"When Irfirst came to this cam-
pus last year, I was appalled at some
of the things that MSA was doing
with my money and resolutions that
supposedly represented the student
body," said Brent House, a Conser-
vative Coalition candidate.
House added, "However, I think
a lot of good changes have been made
and I want to be a part of helping to
make these changes more complete."

PC
Continued from page 1
her time to look away from the
semantics of the term PC and fo-
cus on the arguments of anti-PC
people and discussed free speech,
verbal harassment and affirmative
action.
Free speech, verbal harassment,
and speech codes were also the fo-
cus of the conference's most
widely-attended event, Saturday
night's seminar on "Free Speech,
Hate Speech, and 'P.C."'
A standing-room only crowd
packed Angell Hall Auditorium
B, many to hear Law Prof.
Catharine Mackinnon speak on the
ramifications of the Holocaust
revisionism advertisement which
ran in the Daily three weeks ago
and its relation to speech restric-
tions on campus.
Joined by Michigan Daily
opinion page editor Stephen Hen-
derson, editor at large of the
Michigan Review John Miller,
and two other University profes-
sors, Mackinnon drew applause
for criticizing the adhas hate
speech, arguing "the First
Amendment does not protect this
kind of speech."
A series of questions from the
audience challenged Assistant
Prof. of Jewish studies Anita
Norich and Law Prof. Alex
Aleinikoff on their views of the
ad - Norich's which was pas-
sionately against the publishing
and Aleinikoff's which was an at-
tempt to explain the limits of the
First Amendment.
In the end the forum turned
into a debate between Mackinnon

and Miller over a memo circu-
lated by University Executive Di-
rector of Public Relations Walter
Harrison.
The memo in question, in
which Harrison suggested adop-
tion of therterm "sexual orienta-
tion" rather than "sexual prefer-
ence" angered Miller, who saw
the suggestion as a demand and
thus considered it as an attempt
by administration to curtail free
speech.
Mackinnon's reading of the
memo, with vocal emphasis on
words such as "suggestion" drew.
applause from the crowd, and
from Harrison who stood up and
commented, "Professor Mackin-
non is exactly right."
Most of Saturday and yester-
day's seminars tackled the issues
of current and future curriculum
reforms at the University - how
to achieve multiculturalism in
the classroom and then how to
create an environment that is
comfortable for all cultures.
Discussed at length were pro-
grams such as the English Depart-
ment's "New Traditions" re-
quirement which requires stu-
dents to take at least one course
focusing in on "non-canonical"
literature, such as African Ameri-
can or women's writings.
At the conference's conclu-
sion last night, Jon Wiener, a re-
porter for The Nation, said that
political correctness opponents
often cloud the issue, and dis-
course with "PC foilers" can de-
rail the true intent of the move-
ment.

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Students in each program will take classes in Spanish
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Tuesday, November 19, 1991, 4:00 pm
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OLD
Continued from page 1
Running as an independent in the
MSA elections is difficult, accord-
ing to RC junior Conan Smith, who
saw it as his downfall in last year's
election.
"I didn't really get a lot of sup-
port running as an independent,"
Smith said. "Running with a party
gives a lot of back-up from the peo-
ple you work with."
Smith added that he is confident
not only because he is associated
with a party this year, but also be-
cause the Progressive Party is com-
posed of the whole spectrum of the
left.
flowever, members of the Con-
servative Coalition disagree.
James Green, president of MSA,
said the explanation of a split left is
largely, "a case of sour grapes."
"It is a rationalization for the
smashing victory that the Conserva-
tive Coalition had last year," Green
said.
Green said he doesn't think the
individuals have any better chance of
winning because there is only one

party representing the left this year.
The returning candidates have
various views on the difference be-
tween this year and last year's elec-
tions.
"There is a lot more at stake this
year," Ochoa said. "Students are be-
ing taught a bad lesson in their years
here - that student government
doesn't matter and they don't have
to vote. This is devastating for
democracy."
Sisson said this year's election is
a lot more relaxed than last
semester because the student body is
not voting on executive positions
such as president or vice president.
"It has gone more towards issues
that involve students than world
events," Sisson said. "The focus is
on what's happening with Univer-
sity policies involving police, the
Union, and on MSA allocation of
money."
On the other hand, Smith said a
problem is that the election is not
issue-centered.
"It is a lot more secure as far as
the parties go," Smith said. "But the
concern is not with the issues, it
seems to be petty politicking."

Economics, St. Andrews or York.

Students at Essex and York

may choose Winter semester or a full year abroad.

90

Wednesday, November 20, 1991, 5:00 pm
451 Mason Hall

48 E. 11th St.
New York
NY 10003

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ELECTION
Continued from page 1
past histories - Edwards has
twice been indited and acquitted on
racketeering charges and Duke is a
former Grand Wizard of the Ku
Klux Klan - the race of the voters
played a major role. While Duke
captured the white vote by a mar-
gin of 55 percent to 45 percent, 96
percent of the Black vote went to
Edwards, according to exit polls
conducted by The New Orleans
Times-Picayune. Edwards was also
helped by capturing 75 percent of
voters who went with incumbent
Republican Gov. Buddy Roemer,

who placed third in the Oct. 19
primary.
The wide margin of defeat
leaves a question as to what lies in
the future for Duke. Though he lost
the election, Duke gained
widespread national recognition
through the campaign, and is ru-
mored to be considering a run for
the presidency in 1992. Rumors are
also circulating that Duke will run
for Congress.
Edwards has until Jan. 13 to
prepare for his fourth term in of-
fice. This is the first time a
Louisiana governor will take office
in January.

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