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November 15, 1991 - Image 10

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1991-11-15

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Page 10-The Michigan Daily- Friday, November 15,1991

Ja
Jesus goes straight to heaven

bO Nima Hodaei
'J do have maybe a different ap-
proach, particularly lyrically, com-
pared to a lot of people," says Mark
Griffin (a.k.a. MC 900 Ft. Jesus). "I
think maybe that helps sometimes
to: give (journalists) something to
write about. Even if you really like
a4,and, a lot of times it's hard to
think up something to say about
them that couldn't apply to eight
hundred million other groups. I re-
ally consider myself to be trying to
do something not really like what
anybody else is doing."
And thus, out of the sweltering
heat of Dallas, Texas, a creative idea
was conceived. MC 900 Ft. Jesus -
whose name comes from a ridicu-
lous vision Oral Roberts once had
- breaks any and all stereotypes
when it comes to music. Griffin de-
scribes his music as an act in futil-
ity, because his style has changed so

greatly from his 1990 debut album,
Hell With The Lid Off, which mixed
a sinister assortment of industrial
grooves, hip-hop dance beats and rap.
Griffin's latest release, Welcome
To My Dream, is a rap-jazz fusion-
dance-experimental collection of
songs.
"I did want to change as much as
I possibly could anyway," Griffin
points out, "and still kind of keep
the spirit of what I was trying to
do. Just because, on the one hand, af-
ter working in a record store for
eight years, I was just totally para-
noid and afraid of the whole sopho-
more slump. So I wanted to change
as many things as possible."
Griffin is provocative because of
his ability to mix rhythmically ap-
pealing beats that make you want to
dance with lyrics that make you
want to cringe. For example, on
"The City Sleeps," a tune off his
new album, Griffin raps, "I pause, I

The Eating Disorders Program is seeking members for a 10 week
psychoeducation group focusing on managing eating
disordered behavior, beginning January 22, 1992.
For more information contact Vivian Folsom MSW
at 936-4861 Monday - Friday 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
E"University of Michigan
Medical Center
SPRING TERM IN
:NE HAISIRE
NEW ENGLAND LIFRJUEPROGRM
Earn credit as you study
Thoreau, Emerson, Frost,
Hawthorne-"in their
native habitat.
- MASS MEETING &SLIDE SHOW
Thursday, November 21 st
8:00p.m.
Aud. C Angell Hall
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION. CALL 761-9579

think about the past in gloom/ The
smell of gasoline permeates the
room/ Everyone has a little secret he
keeps/ I light the fires while the
city sleeps." Is Griffin, the man
away from the MC 900 Ft. Jesus
personality, also this insane?!
"I never consider myself as actu-
ally the person that I'm talking
about in a song," he explains. "I al-
ways feel more like I'm telling a
story or something. But it obvi-
ously comes from me somehow. I've
just never been able to get a grip on
how any of that stuff really relates
to me. I know I have this little cyni-
cal sense of humor and I think that
finds its way into most of the songs,
but not all of them."
Welcome To My Dream, Grif-
fin's second release on the Nettwerk
label (which also supports acts such
as Skinny Puppy and Severed Heads),
brings in a variety of interesting el-
ements and concepts. The most cre-
ative element Griffin employs is the
mix of hip-hop with a live feel.
"Falling Elevators," the album's
first track, starts with Griffin's
jerky rap style and ends with a cap-
tivating jazz solo, played by
Griffin. This type of approach is, at
times, almost too experimental.
Griffin, however, has single-hand-
edly reinvented the use of standard
industrial-rap technology, including
such instruments as samplers.
"It's kind of shifted in the way I
use (samplers)," he says. "I was try-
ing to get at this real sort of hybrid
between a live band sound and a hip-
hop-type sound. And I found that
instead of sampling records, why
not just sample and loop yourself
(playing)? You get the same aural
effect. It's like a very human sound,
but it's got this unnatural repetitive
quality."
The live performance given by
MC 900 Ft. Jesus is an unbelievable
sight. Touring with an actual sup-
porting band that includes long-
time collaborator DJ Zero (Patrick
Rollins) and incorporating unusual
visual elements with the aid of cam-
eras, Griffin has put together a show
with which he is quite pleased.
"I'm following up this idea of
the fact that it's a hip-hop show," he
says, "but it's melded with a live
band. So we have a drummer and I'm
playing the horn parts that are in the
new tunes. I'm really, really happy
with it. I think musically, it's a lot
See JESUS, Page 11

Tripping the light fantastic
On Saturday, November 2, the Indian American Student Association (IASA) presented its annual Diwali
Cultural Show, a celebration which featured both traditional and modern Indian singing, dancing and music.
This year's show - which was centered around the theme of "Student Life in India" - ran the gamut, from
a Bengali folk dance to a fashion show to a hilarious skit spoofing the Bradys entitled "The Patel Bunch."
Diwali, or "the Festival of Lights," is "one of India's major festivals," according to IASA Vice President
Minoti Amin. She says that the event "symbolizes the victory of good over evil." And good triumphed with
attitude - the Show was moved from the Mendelssohn Theatre, which it sold out last year, to the more
spacious Power Center, which was sold out this year. Can Hill Auditorium be far? Crisler Arena? The Pontiac
Silverdome? But anyway, the next IASA function should be much more low-key, a Holiday Dance, December
6 at the Trotter House on Washtenaw. The dance will be open to the public; admission is $4 for non-
members, $2 for members.

,i

They may not be Republicans,
but they get five stars from us

by Alexandra Beller
If you're looking for easy access into the dance world,
this weekend may be your perfect opportunity.
Tomorrow evening, the Laurie Eisenhower Dance
Ensemble will be performing an eclectic array of high
energy and fun pieces.
Formed last summer, the Detroit-based company
has done much work in the city's high school system. A
recent $25,000 grant from the Michigan Council for
the Arts, however, proves that the group is no kid's
company. The choreography covers a diverse range of
topics and styles, with something for every taste.
Works for this concert include the premier of 11ey, a
rhythmic piece showcasing the athleticism and virtuos-
ity of its performers. "It's such a fun and exciting piece
and the dancers do such a great job in it that we're all
very excited about the premier," says Eisenhower.
Shan Pass is a pure movement piece based, in part, on
images in Chinese literature. A special addition to the
concert will be a performance of Shane O'Hara's Art,
Money and the DaDo Da, a comedic work about art and
arts funding.
The show's variety of styles is due in great measure

to the diverse training of Eisenhower herself. After re-
ceiving a BFA in Dance from Arizona State, she moved
on to the professional scene, performing with such
companies as Pilobolus and David Parsons. Returning
to Arizona State, she then earned her MFA in Dance,
whereupon she joined Detroit's Harbinger Dance Comi
pany (eventually becoming the artistic director).
Although Harbinger no longer exists, perhaps its
intentions have been carried out through the Eisen-
hower Ensemble (several of Harbinger's former;
members dance with Eisenhower). Among her plan;
for the company, Eisenhower wants to create an outlet
for young choreographers, especially, she says, "those
contemporary artists who are really on the cutting
edge."
Eisenhower will bring with her six dancers;
including University alumni Desiree Buonbrisco and
Greg Patterson and guest artist Bruce Rabey (whose
previous credits include Performance Network
concerts).

i

YOU'LL FIND THE CUTTING EDGE IN MUSIC
ON A&M RECORDS AND ALWAYS AVAILABLE

I

THE LAURIE EISENHOWER
performs tomorrow night at 8,
Dance Building. Tickets are
students with ID. Call 763 5460

DANCE ENSEMBLE
p.m. in Studio A of the
general admission$
)for more info.

"

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AA N N A R B O R

FIN HfICiIIIGAN&AILYIAFF. CALl

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A N N A R B O R
HOLOJA!T rFr-joRIAL
F O U N D A T I O N

CD $11.99
C SS $7.99
sale ends 11121

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The Michigan Daily has published a revisionist ad
denying the reality of the Holocaust, and has subse-
quently defended its acceptance of that ad based on
the First Amendment. The ad advocated anti-Semitic
and racist ideas and deeply offended the memory of
the 6 million Jewish victims of the Holocaust, their
surviving relatives, and indeed all decent human
beings. The Ann Arbor Holocaust Memorial Founda-
tion strongly condemns the Michigan Daily for col-
laborating in the dissemination of this racist attitude.
Particularly at a time when The University of Michi-
gan makes every effort to counteract such expres-
sions of racism in any form, we fervently believe that
revisionist viewpoints have no place whatsoever in
any publication associated with the University.

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e strongly endorse the editorial statement of the Ann Arbor News of
October 28, 1991, which reads in part:
"Newspapers have a responsibility to the public to ensure that
whatever is published-in advertising or on news pages-is accurate to
the best of our knowledge and not purposefully racist."
The Holocaust Memorial Foundation is a multi-religious and multi-racial organization that was
established in 1989 by the Ann Arbor City Council to erect a "Place of Remembrance" to memorialize
the victims of the Holocaust and to educate our community about this tragedy. We are very pleased that
University of Michigan officials have informally agreed to locate the memorial on University property

____j

Buv-anv A&M £CD or Casstte and aet $2.00 off a

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