100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 14, 1991 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1991-11-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 2-The Michigan Daily- Thursday, November 14, 1991

Detroit breaks mold in education

DETROIT (AP) - America's
top education policy-maker called
on Detroit yesterday to lead Presi-
dent Bush's push for "break-the-
mold" schools by setting higher
standards and graduating
prospective dropouts.
"America will not succeed if
Detroit does not succeed," U.S. Edu-
cation Secretary Lamar Alexander
told more than 2,000 cheering stu-
dents and school officials at Cass
Technical High School.
Detroit was the nation's first
major urban school district to adopt
Bush's America 2000 education
plan, aimed at improving the
nation's public school system.
"I don't know of another big-

city school district that's headed
more in the right direction than this
district in Detroit," the former
Tennessee governor said.
Alexander's optimism, echoed
by Gov. John Engler, drew a swift
and cynical response from U.S. Rep.
William D. Ford (D-Mich.).
"President Bush and Gov. Engler
each has refused to provide signifi-
cant new funding for Michigan edu-
cation," Ford said, adding yester-
day's event was "more a public rela-
tions ploy than an honest, real
commitment to making things
better for Detroit's school
children."
If the Bush administration really
meant business on education, it

I

r
I
I
I
SI
I
I
I

'----m- - - - --- - -
SALE
' - anSA LE

- -- - --- -
215 S. State
Ann Arbor
995-DEAD
(upstairs)

~1
1
i
1
1
1
_
I
I
I
I
I
_I

would support a $700-million
Neighborhood School Improvement
Act, Ford said. The money would be
shared by all neighborhood schools
rather than a select few.
Engler joined Alexander in an-
nouncing what the governor said
would be sweeping reforms in
Michigan public schools.
The state would provide grants
to businesses that guarantee jobs to
graduates, reward school districts
whose students choose teaching ca-
reers and pay for satellite hookups
and other equipment designed to de-
feat the limits of geography, Engler
said.
Students said they supported the
call to educational excellence. But
student musicians protested En-
gler's visit with black arm bands
and fliers to criticize the governor's
cuts to the arts.
"The students themselves need
to set the challenge to have a better
school," said Lawrence Foster, a
Cass Tech senior. "No one is going
to give you anything. You've got to
go get it yourself."
Detroit school officials said they
adopted their own Detroit 2000 ini-
tiative, aimed at reducing the city's
40-percent dropout rate to 10 per-
cent by the next century.
HARASSMENT
Continued from page 1
said the department would turn any
complaint over to University ad-
ministrators to investigate.
"The policy is to make a state-
ment condemning sexual harass-
ment," she said.
The political science depart-
ment's initiative has inspired other
University departments to consider
developing policies of their own,
said other department chairs. Most
departments, however, have used the

1
I{
L___--

20% OFF all
Grateful Dead Tour
Shirts
'til Nov. 30, 1991
with this Ad

Poetry in motion
Paige Etter, a junior in Community High School, and Michael Woodberry, a Dance school sophomore, rehearse,
for the Ann Arbor Ballet Theater's annual holiday production of The Nutcracker.

Wwo J

w

\\
/ }
4, .
\,
v'vw..
3, ..r.
\r'R
_
T

B L U E

\' I

University's most recent policy to
make faculty and staff members
more aware.
Edwin Miller, associate dean of
the School of Business Administra-
tion, said sexual harassment "will
not be tolerated." Miller said the
Business School abides by the Uni-
versity's policy.
"We have to deal with each other
in a way which enhances the quality
of interpersonal relationships be-
tween faculty and staff," he said.
"We are moving forward to really
deal with sexual harassment."

Mary Winter, administrative as-
sistant in the department of Indus-
trial and Operations Engineering,
'Sexual harassment is
difficult to define'
- Kay Dawson
said the department does not have a
policy separate from the University.
She said no one has filed a claim of
sexual harassment since she came to
the department in 1982.

In the Communications depart-
ment, Associate Chair Vincent Price
said the executive committee has
discussed devising a departmental
policy.
"Currently, we don't have one,""
Price said. "The committee is in the
process of finding what other de-
partments have in place."
He expressed concern that stu-
dents who are in situations of expe-
riencing sexual harassment do not
know where to go but that they
should contact department or Uni-
versity administrators with any@
concerns.

Saturday November 16, 8pm
rackham auuCitori u m
FA L LCONCERT
U of M's coed A CAPPELLA Singing Ensemble
SPECIAL GUEST: Oberlin's Nothing But Treble
TCKETTS $3 00 Available at Michigan Union Ticket
I J Oie andAllicketMasterOuts
763-IK S
University Activities Center 763-1107

PC
Continued from page 1
sues and makes it difficult to open
things up for debate," said Rackham
graduate student Jeff Gauthier.
"It's like in the 1950s when all
kinds of ideas started being called
communist so it got to the point
where you just could not discuss
things like socialist economics
without being called a communist."
While Gauthier said he hopes
this weekend's conference will dis-
cuss the problems with the issues
this stereoptype encompasses and

dispel the "myths" of political cor-
rectness, former MSA President
Jennifer Van Valey feels that PC is
more than a myth. "I think PC does
exist," Van Valey said.
"There's something chic about
college liberalism. For many stu-
dents it's their first time to pursue
new ideas and that's great. But I
think people are becoming hung up
in things like language and never
exploring the real issues. I know a
lot of guys who are careful never to
call a woman a girl but they practice
sexist attitudes in every aspect of
their lives," Van Valey said.

HISPANIC
Continued from page 1
cruitment nationally and at the
University is good. "For a school
Michigan's size the number of
Latino students is good. Nationally,
the numbers are also positive," he
said.
Raoul Medina, a first-year grad-
uate student in Public Health and
former president of the Puerto Ri-
can Association, said quotas are not
the answer.

"Students should be accepted be-
cause they are good students. The
Senate is recognizing that schools
with Hispanics can make it across
the country if they are given the
chance," he said.
Magallan saidthe aid is geared
toward low-income Hispanic
students.
"The focus is on low-income
students. The fact that these stu-
dents are Hispanic is not as impor-
tant as the need to help these stu-
dents pay for school," Magalla2
said.

..

"
"
_ i JAM JAW a

v-Ari--v

NOW TWO LOCATIONS
SERVING UofM
G UE NS
1%
0*

NI
66AM
COMA
665-:

/M /
RTH
'PUS
1ONS
2 8 0 0 011990 little Caesar Enterprises, Inc.

CHIGAN
(NION
(Lower Level)
65-2034

COMMERS
Continued from page 1
lems that go on," he said. "And
that's why I have this job."
Commers cited a statistic that
75 percent of sexual assaults re-
ported to the Sexual Assault Pre-
vention and Awareness Center are
alcohol related, and he also points
toward several accidents that have
occured in relation to the consump-
tion of alcohol.
"The environment (of the Greek
system) is a lot different than it
was even a few years ago," ex-
plained IFC Advisor Joe Foster.
"There are a lot of people upset
with the Greek system and are con-
cerned with what they should be
doing."
However, several members
within the Greek community are
upset with the IFC's recent push
for a BYOB policy.
"If a frat wants to assume its
JOBS
Continued from page 1
In St. Louis for a political
fundraiser, Bush called the com-
promise "good news" and "long
overdue" and said he would sign the
measure. "No doubt about the sig-
nature if it stays the way this deal
has been hammered out, abso-
lutely," he said.
"It looks like we now have at
long last an unemployment com-
pensation bill that will get money
into the hands of those whose bene-
fits have run out," Bush said. "I
don't think we're in a recession" al-
though "some places are and some
people are hurting."
"I think the deal you've been
able to hammer out ... is a good one,"
Bush said by telephone to Senate
Minority Leader Bob Dole and
House Minority Leader Robert
Michel (R-Ill.). "I think it's some-
thing I know I can enthusiastically
support."
However, Rep. William Thomas
(R-Calif.) said, "If they'd continued

own liability (for serving alco-
hol), then that's its prerogative,"
said Chi Phi member and LSA ju-
nior Jonah Seiger.
"We are different people with
different desires and different
problems," said Sigma Phi Presi-
dent Marko Spinar, an LSA senior.
"The IFC has no right to tell me I
can't give beer to my friends in my
house... personally, my institution
is sick of it."
Commers, however, sees deep
ethical and liability problems with
fraternities supplying alcohol at
parties.
Unless Greek organizations
cease to supply alcohol at parties,
he said, they cannot, "with in-
tegrity," step forward to help
solve those problems stemming
from its consumption.
Commers and Kendall have
formed a committee to formulate a
new alcohol policy, which, Com-
mers stressed, is the first opportu-

The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter
terms by students atthe University of Michigan. On-campus subscription rate forfall/winter9l-92 is $30;
all other subscriptions via first class U.S. mail are $149 - prorated at Nov. 1, 1991, to $105. Fall
subscription only via first class mail is $75- prorated at Nov.1 to $46. Subscriptions must be prepaid.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and the Associated Collegiate Press.
ADDRESS: The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1327.
PHONE NUMBERS: News (313) 764-0552, Opinion 747-2814, Arts 763-0379, Sports 747-3336,
circulation 764-0558, Classified advertising 764-0557, Display advertising 764-0554, Billing 764-0550.

nity for an open debate for differ-
ent ideas in a democratic forum.
"If there is one thing that I con-
sider more detrimental than not
having a more comprehensive alco-
hol policy, it's a lack of democracy
within the system," he said. He ex-
plained that democracy must be ad-
hered to in order to assure a policy
that people will accept.
"I knew that people would be
very upset," but, he added, "it is
not a prohibition issue, it's a sup-
ply issue."
"BYOB has already survived
the test of time and the test of the
court system," Commers said.
Many people have been concerned
about the new policy, he said,
thinking that parties would be cur-
tailed. However, Commers assured
that parties have gone even better
than he had expected: "Without
exception, BYOB parties this
semester have gone phenome-
nally."

DINE-IN OR CARRY-OUT
L 11 VALUABLE COUPON 1E 1 1m Or 1111 VALABLECOUP111111111 E VALUABLE COUPON U1---1 --111VALUABLE COUPON s m1
BABYTDOUBLE"SLICETwo SMALL
a a. CRAZY CRUSTSm CHEESE PIZZAS
and a 16 oz. soft drink
PAN. -
9and a 16 oz. soft drink
Ps Plus Tax'
1 Plus Tax I
II
Plus Tax 1 ADITONAL TOPPINGS
YOUR CHOICE: Om
1 1 That's 1/4 of a 1 ONE OF EACH! 99

EDITORIAL STAFF:
Editor in Chief
Managing Editor
News Editors
Opinion Editor
Associate Editor
Editorial Assistants
Weekend Editor
Associate Editor
Photo Editor

Andrew Gottesman Managing Sports Editor
Josh Minick SportsEditors
Philip Cohen, Christine
Kloostra, Donna Woodwell, Arts Editors
Sarah Schweitzer Books
Stephen Henderson Film
Katie Sanders Fine Arts
Geoff Earle, Amitava Mazumdar Music
Gil Renberg Theater
Jesse Walker List Editor
Kenneth J. Smoller

Matt Rennie
Theodore Cox, Phil Green, John Niyo
Jeff Sheran, Dan Zoch
Mark Binelli, Elizabeth Lenhard
Valerie Shuman
Michael John Wilson
Juke Komorn
Annette Petrusso
Jenie Dahlmann
Christine Kloossa

News: Merav Barr, Barry Cohen, Lynne Cohn, Ben Deci, Lauren Dermer, Henry Goldblat, Andrew Levy, Travis McReynolds,
Josh Meckler, Uju Oraka, Rob Patton, Melissa Peerless, Tami Pollak, David Rheingold, Bethany Robertson, Karen Sabgir, Julie
Schupper, Gwen Shaffer, Purvi Shah, Jennifer Silverberg, Stefanie Vines, JoAnne Viviano, Ken Walker, David Wartowski,
Chastity Wilson.
Opinion: Mat Adler, Chris Alendulis, Brad Bernatek,Renee Bushey, Yal Citro, Erin Einhon, David Leitner, Brad Miler, Ai
Rotenborg, David Shepardson.
Sports: Chris Carr, Ken Davidoff, Andy DeKorte,Kimberly DeSempelaere, Matthew Dodge, Josh Dubow, Shawn DuFresn, Jim
Foss, Ryan Herring ton, Bruce Inosencio, Alber tLin, Dan Linna, Rod Loewenthal, Sharon Lundy, Adam Miller, Rich Wstvalsky,
Tim Rardin, Chad Safarn, David Schechter, Eric Sklar, Tim Spolar, Andy Stabile, Ken Sugiura, Jeff Williams.
Arts: Greg Baise, Skot Beal, Jen Bilk, Andrew J. Cahn, Richard S. Davis, Brent Edwards, Gabriel Feldberg, Rosanne Freed,
Diane Frieden, Forrest Green IIl, Aaron Hamburger, Nima Hodaei, Alan J. Hogg, Roger Hsia, Marie Jacobson, Kristin Knudson, .
Mike Kolody, Mike Kuniavsky, Amy Meng, John Morgan, Liz Patton, Austin Ratner, Antonio Roque, Jeff Rosenberg, Joseph
Schreiber, Christine Slovey, Kevin Stein, Scott Sterling, Kim Yaged.
Photo: Brian Cantoni, Anthony M. Croll, Jennifer Dunetz, Kristofter Gillette, Michelle Guy, Doug Kanter, Heather Lowman,
Sharon Musher, Suzie Paley.
Weekend: Lisa Bean, Jonathan Chait, Craig Linne, Dan Poux, Matt Pulliam.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan