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September 05, 1991 - Image 66

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1991-09-05
Note:
This is a tabloid page

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The Michigan Daily/New Student Edition - Thur;

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RECORDS
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Used books: an
Exploring the shops, both upstairs

by Elizabeth Lenhard

1140 South University Hours:
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P icture the dusty, mysterious
bookstore of The Never Ending
Story or the reverence for books in
Crossing Delancey. Ann Arbor's
used book stores are a few of the
places where you actually feel as if
you're in a movie. The atmosphere
created by labyrinthine aisles, ex-
posed fluorescents, hand-printed
categories such as "Yoga" and
"Occult," and a store cat is genuine.
Ann Arbor is famous for having
more book stores per square yard
than any other city. Some just sell
rare and antique books, others cater
to religious groups or gays and les-
bians. The used book stores however,
are for anybody who enjoys search-
ing for books as much as reading
them. The stores are both a gamble
(don't expect them to have that text
book that you can't afford at
Ulrich's) and a secure soft spot to
flee to when the capitalistic gloom
of America simply overwhelms
you. And if you're looking for vol-
ume no. 2, issue no. 67 of the first
edition of the Hardy Boys myster-
ies, they'll probably have it.
David's Books on the corner of
State and East Liberty is famous for
the huge mural painted on its side
wall. Immersed in a bed of flowers
are such imposing writers as Kafka,
Poe, Woody Allen, and someone
who looks suspiciously like Elvis.
(Did he write "Love Me Tender"?)

Upstairs you'll find unstained
wood bookshelves, stacks of books
lining the floors, and the sounds of
public radio wafting through the
aisles. When I interviewed David's
owner, Ed Koster, Jack Kerouac was
reading poetry on the radio, and cus-
tomers wandered in whom Koster
greeted by name.
The pace at David's is laid-back
- we're talking borderline
lethargy here. Koster said that one
of the best things about owning
David's is working as much or as
little as he wants. Of course, he
adds, "If you're into making a lot of
money, well...." Right Ed. The mo-
tivating factor behind David's is ob-
viously not money. When you go to
Borders' and they charge you $8.95
for a 90-page paperback, that's busi-
ness, profit, and the American way.
David's however, comes off as more
of a service, offering low-priced
books with a fascinating history be-
hind them, to boot. (OK, Ed made
me say that.) When you consider
however, how many books are ob-
tained through estate sales, or are
sold as the tragic remnants of de-
stroyed marriages, the idea is more
intriguing than the drab sterility of
commercial shops.
For the most part, David's offers
a broad scope of recent fiction at
prices that are anywhere from 25
cents to $10. Koster is careful to
buy books that are in good condition
and will probably sell. "About

SONY

NETWORK
Continued from page 9
seven of their own shows a year,
leaving the remaining theater time
to be rented to 10 to 20 touring
companies. Over the last 10 years a
lot of artists have been through the
network. "It's exciting being in a
space where lots of artists come and
go because you get to watch other
people form the same type of part-
nership that PN has formed," says
Kendall. The network does not
merely rent out space, however.
Each company has the full emo-
tional and financial support of the
network. Brougton explains that
they "share the risk with every
group that comes into the network,
and that group becomes part of the
network. We share both box office
losses and gains."
Brougton believes, "The more
different types of people you bring
(into the theater) the greater differ-
ence you see in the art." She goes on
to encourage University students to
become involved at the Performance
Network because "they offer a
whole new viewpoint." There are
open auditions for actors, while de-
signers and lighting technicians are
always needed. Any involvement
would teach students how to pro-
duce a show in the "real world."
But the Network doesn't just sup-
ply a workable knowledge of the
theater. It also introduces one to a
myriad of creative people, creating a
personal network of collaborations
and contacts. "It's fun to watch
someone who came in as a com-
pletely inexperienced actor ending
up in another person's production....
then another person's production,
and another's..." laughs Broughton.
Kendall hopes that the state cuts
in arts funding will inspire more
collaboration among theater groups.
"Collaboration is where we find
our empowerment. We get our
strength and ability to do what we
want to do by working with other
people." Judca reveals the essence of
what the Performance Network is
all about, saying, "It is a wonderful
family to be in. If anyone is looking
for a family and doesn't have one,
(the Performance Network) is a
great place to go. I certainly con-
sider it my family."
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Weird, zany, wacky, interesting theater, that's the Performance
Network. Here's Malcolm Tulip from PN's recent production of New
Synthetic Circus. All their productions are not this way out.

Due to space constraints beyoi
features on the myriad of Arts
be found in the first section <
them and you'll find the finish
cinema and more arts stories
your study cavern and make yc
.1

CINEMA
Continued from page 10
typical schedule contains both
Dusan Makavejev's WR: Mysteries
of the Organism, a surreal political
comedy focused on sex, and Yvonne
Rainer's Privilege, an experimental
documentary about menopause.

Find out what's out there, read.

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This place thrives mainly on
people," says Omar Junca, when
asked about the cuts made in
Michigan's funding for the arts.
Junca is the minister of "informa-
tion" at the Performance Network,
408 West Washington. "(Perfor-
mance Network) is a communal,
enriching experience... and it needs a
little water, not much, we're not
asking for a flood or an enormous
waterfall... just a trickle now and
then." And sure enough, the
Network's outstanding reputation
and commitment to "produce and
facilitate the production of original,
experimental and socially relevant
work in the performing arts" has
grown like a weed since the theater
was established nearly 10 years ago.
Performance Network was con-
ceived by a group of seven artists
dedicated to building a theater audi-
ence who wanted to see new, origi-
nal, creative work by unknown
playwrights. Each of the partners
was involved in different mediums,

such as film, video, and experimen-
tal theater. This assured a creative,
eclectic background onto which they
could paint their concept of innova-
tive theater. The concept was in full
form, but devoid of the space in
which they could develop their
ideas. A virtually empty ware-
house/factory complex on West
Washington, still called the
Technology Center, was the com-
munal-type all purpose space they
needed. The unused room in the
complex was converted into stu-
dios, giving birth to a small artists
colony. Ironically, the room the
Network now uses as a combined set
shop, rehearsal room, and manager's
office once housed a company that
manufactured velvet paintings.
The Network is now managed by
a dedicated few who were brave
enough to take on the task of run-
ning the business behind the artistic
endeavors. Program director Joh
Broughton asserts "the people who
manage PN are actually just artists
trying to manage. Therefore we
See NETWORK, Page 9

ACHIEVE THE IMPOSSIBLE " EXPERIENCE THE THEATRE " SEE THE INVISIBLE "
w Second Stage
t J
Productions
r.1991-1992 Season
L DUET FOR ONE " FOXFIRE
* by Tom Kampinski by Susan Cooper and Hume
September 19-October 5. 1991 Cronyn
N Directed by Simon Ha March 26-April 11, 1992
z Directed by Susan Morris
_ FOOL FOR LOVE
S by Sam Shepard THE MISS FIRECRACKER
November 7-23, 1991 CONTEST
- Directed by Anne Kolaczkowski by Beth Henley
. Magee July 2-18, 1992
Directed by Cassie Mann
w
" * THE DEATH AND LIFE OF For Subscription
= SNEAKY FITCH
w by James L Rosenberg Information
z Jar.uary 30-February 15, 1992 Call 662-7282
c Directed by Thom Johnson
W 31S1SSOdN'4 3H. 3A31HV * 318lNV1NIH1 1333 * 3181SIKNI NHi 33S

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