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October 14, 1991 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1991-10-14

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The Michigan Daily - Monday, October 14, 1991 - Page 7
World officials strive to
d Y'o"........rebuild Soviet economy
. BANGKOK, Thailand (AP) - U.S. Treasury Secretary Nicholas countries, the shift to market
The biggest industrial democracies Brady said the United States and the economies has brought inflation,
9' 4f agreed yesterday on what they other industrial powers "will be as and people have lost jobs because of
called a historic plan to help the responsive as we possibly can in th< the shutdown of inefficient

Soviet Union build a market
economy, but they made no specific
promises of additional financial aid.
The Group of Seven said deputy
finance ministers from their coun-
tries would go to Moscow to dis-
cuss programs for economic recon-
struction. French officials said the
visit would begin in a week to 10
days.
The agreement was reached after
two days of talks between the
Soviets and the finance ministers of
the Group of Seven nations - the
United States, Japan, Germany,
France, Italy, Canada and Britain.
Officials described the meeting
as historic because it marked the
first time the Soviet Union had
sought such broad help in remodel-
ing its economy along Western
lines.
Grigory Yavlinsky, leader of the
Soviet delegation, said, "The goals
we jointly want to achieve are not
far from u

shortest space of time."
Several officials said the eco-
nomic crisis has been worsened by
the Soviets' lack of detailed infor-
mation on their economy and Soviet
unfamiliarity with generally ac-
cepted economic practices.
In some former Soviet bloc

businesses.
The Soviets face an immediate
problem of ensuring adequate food
and medical supplies through the
winter. Soviet President Mikhail
Gorbachev has asked for $10 billion
in short-term aid.

R's alive!
Snow in October? It's been known to happen, but this mysterious white fluff in the fountain outside
the MLB is just foam floating on top of the water.

Students
Join local
walk for
hunger
by Uju Oraka
Daily Staff Reporter
The Zion Lutheran Church was
filled with commotion yesterday as
hundreds of men, women and chil-
dren attempted to register for the
17th annual Washtenaw County
CROP Walk for Hunger. People
from various churches, synagogues
and other organizations walked 10
kilometers (6.2 miles) to raise
money for international hunger re-
lief and other development projects
of Church World Service.
Donna Ainsworth, the director
of the Interfaith Council for Peace
and Justice, said she hoped the walk
will reach the goal of $40,000 be-
fore Nov. 22, the donation deadline.
Ainsworth also said Michigan
was the leading state in raising
money for Church World Service.
"People raise money by going to
friends and family and asking them
:4 to pledge money per kilometer or
give a flat rate," Ainsworth said.
"We also do other events besides
the CROP walk to raise money for
local organizations. Twenty-five
percent of the money we raise goes
to local organizations, and the rest
is sent to international groups.
"We have a high turn out rate
from churches and synagogues
because we contact the churches and
they have individual members who
help us with the event," she added.
Tanya MacKrain, a senior in ele-
mentary education, heard about the
walk through her church. "This is
my first time out here, and I asked
friends to sponsor me, giving me
$1.00 per kilometer," MacKrain
said.
Bridget Tomich, an RC sopho-
more, has already been involved in
hfnger walks through her home
Bhurch in Grand Rapids. "I plan on
running today instead of walking. It
will take me an hour tops." Tomich
Vid.
Ten-year-old Brian Shaw was
also an enthusiastic participant of
-the event. "I got $120 from my par-
ents, friends, and people from
school. This is my first time walk-
ing and I am just here for the heck of
it," Shaw said.
Shaw was a representative of
three organizations yesterday: the
Boy Scouts, Church of the
Incarnation, and First Unitarian
Universalist.
Bob Opal, director of the Ann
Arbor Emergency Radio Team, was
there to oversee the event. "We are
here for safety on the course, watch-
9 ing to make sure nothing goes
wrong. My son stays at the end of
the course to know where the last
walkers are," Opal said.
Members of the team were sta-
tioned throughout the course to
monitor the event. Opal coordinated
the team via walkie-talkie.
4~ad

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Join us for a Panel Discussion on
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6:00 - 8:00 pm
University of Michigan
Michigan League Henderson Room
The following schools will be represented:
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Georgetown University
School of International and Public Affairs
Columbia University
School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS)
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