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October 02, 1991 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1991-10-02

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Men's Soccer
vs. Michigan St.
Today, 4 p.m.
Mitchell Field
The Michigan Daily
sthe great scheduling
debate still unsolved

SPORTS

(

Wednesday, October 2, 1991

Volleyball
vs. Ohio St.
Friday, 7:30 p.m.
Keen Arena
Page 9
Men's soccer looks
to upend Spartans

by Theodore Cox
Daily Football Writer
This week's Michigan-Iowa
game should end two big debates.
ne, who has the better football
am. Two, which scheduling strat-
egy is better to enter the conference
season with: playing weak competi-
tion or top 20 competition.
Iowa took the easy road this year.
the Hawkeyes enter the game 3-0
with wins over assorted baked
goods Hawaii, Iowa State, and
Northern Illinois.
"I couldn't be happier," Iowa
Goach Hayden Fry said of his
schedule. "We're 3-0, we're rela-
tively healthy, we've gotten to play
an awful lot of players. Anytime
you get to play a lot of the troops,
the morale is high. If we'd played
someone tougher, we might not be
undefeated right now."
Fry's philosophy is this: he's had
all month to prepare for the
S olverines.
On the other hand, Michigan has
played top 10 teams Notre Dame
and Florida State, plus Boston Col-
lege on the road.
"I think it is important that you
have at least one big game in there,"
Michigan coach Gary Moeller said.
"Notre Dame and Florida State
back-to-back before playing Iowa
might be overdoing it. But I still

like to play good opponents."
Fry had hoped the Wolverines
would win this past weekend. A
victory would have left them over-
confident. Yet, one could argue
Michigan's morale is down, and
Iowa's confidence is high.
"There is no pat answer,"
Moeller said on the matter.
STARTING OVER: Michigan
State has played so poorly, Spartan
coach George Perles has to be glad
it won't affect whether his team
will go to the Rose Bowl or not.
"This is the real advantage of be-
ing in a conference," Perles said.
"Everybody is 0-0. Everybody has
all their non-conference games out
of the way; everybody has done all
their experimenting."
It's safe to assume most of Per-
les' experiments, have failed. The
first "Fire George" signs appeared
at Spartan Stadium Saturday.
Jim Miller has replaced Bret
Johnson at quarterback in an at-
tempt to spark the Spartan's nonex-
istent offense.
BIG TEN HONORS: Indiana's
Vaughn Dunbar is this week's Big
Ten Offensive Player of the Week
and Iowa's Leroy Smith took the
Defensive Player of the Week
award. Dunbar scored three touch-
downs and ran for 265 yards in Sat-
urday's 27-27 tie with Missouri.

by Shawn DuFresne
The start to the Michigan men's
soccer club season thus far has been
an improvement over last year's.
However, the biggest indicator of
how far the club has progressed
will come today at 4 p.m. when they
face archrival Michigan State at
Mitchell Field.
"Most of our losses have been
close, whereas last year we lost by
larger margins," co-captain Dick
Hillary said. "Our offense has yet
to produce substantially. It is only a
matter of time until our offense
gets in synch."
The club hopes to be running on
all cylinders offensively today
against the Spartans. A victory im-
proves the Wolverines record to 5-
4-1, and gives them state bragging
rights.
After a 3-1 victory over Central
Michigan last week, the club has
been preparing to face the Spartans,
who lost their last game to top-
ranked Indiana, 4-0.
MSU's unique offense will pro-
vide a challenge for Michigan. In-

stead of deploying the typical
lineup of four defenders, three mid-
fielders and three forwards, the
Spartan attack consists of five de-
fenders, four midfielders and one
forward.
"They like to pack their defense,
and then send different players up
all the time to assist the forward,"
Hillary said.
The club will try to adapt defen-
sively to State's formation by mak-
ing many switches during the game.
Communication on the Michigan
side will be crucial in order to avoid
defensive breakdowns.
Co-captain Tim Puckett, Kelly
Kuehne, Brian Rosewarne, and goal-
keeper Marc Kuiper will be called
upon to lead the Michigan defense
against the unorthodox Spartan of-
fense.
Offensively, forwards Doug
Spamer and Reza Sadjadpour are hav-
ing productive seasons and will try
to put the ball in the net.

KENNETH SMULLEH/Uaily
Running back Rickey Powers and the rest of the Wolverines will invade
Iowa City, providing the Hawkeyes with their toughest test yet

-A

'VNothing can cover

Mant Rennie

n1-

In case you were wondering what I thought...
BEEBE FANS FLOCK TO CHADRON ST.
In just another indication of the ridiculous
emphasis placed on sports in our society, Buffalo
Bills receiver Don Beebe is apparently influenc-
ing the college decisions of Buffalo youth.
Beebe was enrolled in several different
schools, including Illinois, before he found his
Utopia at Chadron State, a tiny NAIA school in
South Dakota. The Bills drafted Beebe out of
Chadron State in 1989, and he has gone on to be-
come a cult hero in Buffalo.
Apparently, his status has been confirmed by
the high school seniors in the greater Buffalo
area. Beebe recently said that he feels obligated
to return to his alma mater to receive his degree
because nearly a dozen people have enrolled at
Chadron State. Think about that. Chadron State.
In South Dakota.
Now, I'm not one to insult South Dakota, or
North Dakota for that matter, although who
would know the difference? However,J am
amazed that Buffalo youths would be so enam-
ored with their athletic heroes that they would
want to follow them to places like Chadron
State.
Just consider the distance between upstate
New York and South Dakota. For me to make a
trip like that, the school would have to have a
lot to offer. What exactly was going through
the minds of these students?
"Well, the weather's great at UCLA, North-
western's campus is really pretty, and Yale's
got a great reputation. How will I ever decided?
Gee, let's see where ol' Beebe went to school...
"Hmm, well, all right. Chadron State it is!"
What is even more ludicrous is that we're
talking about Don Beebe. Fine, the guy's a solid

VAAup rei
receiver, but I don't care if he's God's gift to
football, I would not go to an NAIA school in
South Dakota because of him.
OLYMPIC FOLLIES
Whether one is an Isiah Thomas fan or not,
the entire Olympic basketball team situation is
absurd. Let's start with Michael Jordan, whose
team responsibilities apparently include, in ad-
dition to carrying the scoring load, selecting the
team roster.
Jordan reportedly did not want Thomas on
the team because of Thomas' refusal to pass him
the ball in an all-star game that was played in
sometime around 1911. I wish I could give you
more details about the game, but like everyone
except Jordan, I have long since forgotten about
the game and the alleged "freeze-out."
Check local listings for an upcoming NBC
salute to Jordan's memory.
However, Thomas should not be exempt
from blame in the whole affair. Thomas goes to
the press with statements like, "I'm going to
take the high road on this matter, but I'm not
happy about it."
What exactly does that mean? If he's going
to take the "high road," that implies that he
isn't going to comment, which obviously wasn't
the case. Make up your mind, Zeke.
Then there's Magic Johnson, who remained
silent while the whole controversy was going
on, then two days after the roster was an-
nounced, issues a statement that Isiah should be
on the team.
It was no secret that Isiah wasn't going to be
on the team, as evidenced by Pistons GM Jack
McCloskey's resignation from- the selection
committee which was dated two weeks before
the official roster announcement. Where was

r

le' bigg9ut
Magic during all this time? He obviously knew
what was going on, so waiting until after the
announcement was a case of too little, too late.
Would Isiah Thomas' real friends please
stand up?
SPARTAN FOLLIES
I want to respect Michigan State. I really do.
However, the folks over in East Lansing refuse
to let me.
Let's start with the Spartan public relations
department. When the season began, these wiz-
ards figured running back Tico Duckett and wide
receiver Courtney Hawkins would be Heisman
Trophy candidates.
Then again, they also figured the Spartans
would beat Central Michigan.
Anyway, in order to promote Duckett and
Hawkins, these P.R. geniuses (an oxymoron, if
there ever was one) began the DUCKETT
DOCKETT and the COURTney REPORT, which
were fax machine releases detailing the statis-
tics of both players.
These shameless efforts seem rather comical
when one considers that Duckett has yet to rush
for 100 yards in a game and that Hawkins has one
touchdown in three games.
Meanwhile, Michigan State coach George
Perles called his choice of starting quarterback
Bret Johnson a "gut feeling." Perles having a
gut feeling is like Dumbo having an ear ache.
Good ol' Georgie must be thinking that his
gut feeling was just gas, now that his team is off
to an 0-3 start. This is just after State lost their
second game in three years to that national jug-
gernaut Rutgers. Perles is probably searching
for a school to replace the mighty Scarlet
Knights on future Spartan schedules.
Maybe he could schedule Chadron State.

Vaughn off and running,
Former Wolverine Jon Vaughn returned a kickoff for a 99 yard
touchdown in a losing effort for the Patriots Sunday.

j-awk
by Theodore Cox
Daily Football Writer

eyes another Blue upset

Twenty years from now, some-
where in Iowa, Hawkeye quarter-
back Matt Rodgers will be sitting
in a bar sipping beer, and someone
will ask him: "Do you remember
'The Drive'?"
It is something Michigan fans
won't easily forget, either. Iowa
trailed the Wolverines a year ago,
23-17, with 4:37 left in the game.
Starting at the Hawkeye 15-yard
line, Rodgers completed five of six
passes, connecting on plays of four,
16,19, 16, and 13 yards.
With 1:09 on the clock, fullback
Paul Kujawa plunged over the
goalline, silencing the 105,517 in at-
tendance at Michigan Stadium. Final
score: Iowa 24, Michigan 23.
"That was the best feeling I've
ever had since I've been a little kid,"
Rodgers said. "We just did it all
right. Everything just went right
then.
"It's crazy because you're sitting
in the huddle and you know you're
going to do it. It's a crazy feeling.
It's like the pinnacle of confidence.
Everyone feels it and everyone is
Olooking into each other's eyes know-

Rodgers directs Iowa against
Michigan in Big Ten showdown

Rodgers couldn't get the job done.
"We hit the brick wall at Ohio
State," Rodgers said. "That really
hurt us. I mean Michigan went
through the same thing. You play as
well as you can and you lose. It re-
ally let the air out of our sails at the
end of the season."
Last year's experiences are just
part of why Rodgers is considered
one of the best quarterbacks in the
country. Moeller puts Rodgers on
the same level as the last two quar-
terbacks his team has faced, Notre
Dame's Rick Mirer and Florida
State's Casey Weldon.
"Rodgers is a fine quarterback,"
Moeller said. "Rodgers is in the
same class as Mirer and Weldon.
Those three are fine quarterbacks.
"This kid's a fifth-year senior.
He has the advantage of playing at
home. He has a good offensive line,
which is one of the best things a
quarterback wants. He is one of our
major concerns when you look at it
from a defensive standpoint."
This is Rodgers' third year at the
helm of the Hawkeyes. He passed
for over 2,000 yards his first two
seasons, and this year he is well on
his way to reaching that mark again.

NUN

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