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September 30, 1991 - Image 16

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1991-09-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 8-The Michigan Daily - Sports Monday - September 30, 1991

Cox
Continued from page 1
"51-31? I mean, what the heck?"
- Moeller asked. "That isn't what
we're looking for."
Michigan was looking to control
the ball and overpower the
Seminoles, which required the of-
fensive line to play up to its top
billing. But Saturday, the line was
far from being the best in the coun-
try.
"One guy missed a block here,
one guy missed a block there, and we
were forced to pass, which isn't
what we wanted to do," Michigan
co-captain Greg Skrepenak said.
Four times the Wolverines at-

tempted to convert on a fourti,
down, and succeeded only once. The
most critical was just before the end
of the first half, when Michigan
quarterback Elvis Grbac threw an
interception on fourth and goal.
Grbac finished with three inter-
ceptions, two of which were run
back for touchdowns. He had no
business even throwing the first
one. Grbac seemed oblivious to
FSU's Terrell Buckley, who read
the play like a cheap novel. Two
plays into the game, and Michigan
has already spotted the top-ranked
team in the nation seven points.
Simply put - bad execution. It
is what made Skrepenak seem a lit-
tle smaller Saturday, and Chancy a
little bigger.

I __~a. ' ~N

A tale of two bands
Two Michigan Marching Bands showed up at Michigan
Stadium Saturday. The first was conspicuous by its fabulous
halftime show. The second, the band that sits in the stands for*
more than three hours, was conspicuous by its absence.
So far this year, in its musical selections and field
formations, the band has done nothing that hasn't been done
before. But it is doing it better than any band in recent
memory.
A nationally-televised game is the ideal time for the
Americana show of choice. The music of John Philip Sousa
always appeals to every audience.
The overwhelming early season favorite for formation-of-
the-year is the waving flag displayed during The Stars and
Stripes Forever. The concept of red, white, and blue stripes *
wound through 225 band members is inspired.
The Michigan Marching Band has many strengths on the
field. But it sorely lacks the ability to stir the crowd while the
clock is running.
Some famous marching bands - Southern Cal and Florida
State in particular - spend the entire game playing music.
The endless strain of melodies whips up the fans into one
great tomahawking mass.
The Florida State band shamelessly repeats its "Go
Seminoles" mantra to the point of exhaustion. FSU fans pick
up on the continuous, energetic spirit. Few college teams can
claim fans as maniacal as the Seminoles'.
The Michigan Marching Band spends too much time sitting
on its hands in the stands. The Maize 'n' Blue musicians need
to play with an attitude. They often seem too refined and
proper. Is it too much to ask the band to lighten up? After all,
it is at a football game.
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NOTEBOOK
Continued from page 5
STREAKING: Saturday's loss
ended Michigan's eight-game win-
ning streak that dated back to last
year's 45-19 victory over Indiana.
On the other hand, the victory in-
creased Florida State's national-best
winning streak to 10.
Seminole quarterback Weldon
upped his record as a starter to 10-0,
but he threw his first interception
of the season when Michigan
linebacker Steve Morrison picked
one off in the second quarter.
Dwayne Ware intercepted another
Weldon pass in the third quarter.
Wolverine running back Ricky
Powers' six-game streak of 100+
yards ended. He totalled 97 yards on

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29 carries. However, by Powers' not
going over the 100-yard plateau the
Wolverines remained perfect at 7-00
when he gains over 100 yards.
Florida State running back
Edgar Bennett's third-quarter
fumble was his first of the year.
Bennett and his backfield mate Amp
Lee fumbled the ball once all of
last season.
Wolverine kicker J.D. Carlson
improved his Michigan record con-
secutive extra point streak to 84 by*
going two for two. With his first
quarter field goal, Carlson also
moved into a second-place tie with
Ali-Haji Sheikh on the all-time
field goal list with 31.
ALMOST TO THE CENTURY
CLUB: Saturday's crowd of 106,145,
the fourth largest in Michigan
Stadium history, marked the 99th
consecutive Michigan home game
with over 100,000 people. The.
Homecoming game, Oct. 19 against
Indiana will mark the 100th time
the Wolverines will go over the
100,000 mark.
To commemorate the event, an
honorary 10 millionth fan will be
selected to recognize the over
10,000,000 people who have been
apart of the streak since it began
Nov. 8, 1975 against Purdue.
In addition, the game ball will
be delivered by parachute and will
be presented to Don Dufek and
Kirk Lewis, captains of the 1975
team that played when the streak
began.
OH, THOSE EXTRA POINTS:
After their second touchdown
Saturday, Florida State began an
unimpressive string of five consecu-
tively missed conversions follow-
ing scores.
Florida State finally kicked a
successful extra point in the fourth
quarter, following its seventh score
- an event that received applause
from all 106,145 fans in attendance.
Of course, back-up punter John
Wimberly split the uprights instead
of regular kicker Dan Mowrey who
had missed three earlier kicks.
"We had a rough time with extra
points today," Bowden said. "WeS
couldn't even kick off."
NO FAITH IN THE KICKING
GAME: When faced with a fourth-
and-seven deep in Michigan terri-
tory, Bowden was faced with two
choices: go for it, or kick a field
goal. Based on his team's overall
performance, he went with the less
risky call - go for it. Two plays
later, tight end Lonnie Johnson
was dancing in the end zone.
"Which odd was best, going for
it, or kicking it," Bowden asked.
"We scored, didn't we?"
Michigan had its own problems
on kickoffs. Wolverine J o h n
Albertson started the game, but he
wasn't getting the ball far down-
field. In the second quarter, J.D.
Carlson took over and the Florida
State returns were held inside the
30-yard line.
DEEP DEPTH: It was thought
before the game that the massive
Michigan lineman might wear out
the Florida State players. But the
Seminoles had enough talent to ro-
tate two or three lineman at each
position.
"Michigan came out to maul us
and maul us," Bowden said. "But
eventually we played a lot of peo-
ple. I think that wore them down." *
"We weren't tired " Michigon

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