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September 26, 1991 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1991-09-26

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The Michigan Daily - Thursday, September 26, 1991 - Page 7

- :,,

Pro-choicers resist waiting-period bill

by Julie Schupper
Daily Women's Issues Reporter
Pro-choice groups gathered yes-
terday in Lansing to speak directly
with legislators to voice their op-
position to Senate Bill 141, the
"informed consent and manatory
waiting period" bill.
The bill, which has already
passed in the state Senate, will be
voted on in the House this fall. It is
now being reviewed by the Public
Health Committee.
If the bill is passed, women seek-
ing an abortion in Michigan will be
required to wait at least 24 hours
after their initial visit to a clinic be-
fore receiving an abortion.
The bill also requires doctors to
inform women about potential

health and emotional complications
which proponents say follow an
abortion. These complications in-
clude post abortion stress syndrome
and the risk of sterility.
"The irony is that possible com-
plications during childbirth are
more common than those of abor-
tion," said Laurie McLean, head of
the pro-choice task force of the
National Organization for Women.
McLean said the legislators were
receptive to lobbyists.
"A lot of legislators who had
never voted pro-choice before were
understanding to the fact that the
bill is an intrusion on doctor-pa-
tient relationships," McLean said.
"Futhermore, legislators were

surprised to realize that the facts
included in the bill were not all
medically accurate. This bill may
have less support than we have seen
for other bills," she added.
Bev Fish, president of the orga-
nization's Ann Arbor-Washtenaw
County division, said she sees the
bill as a dangerous intrusion on the
rights of medical practicioners.
"It is very frightening that doc-
tors may have a strong control put
over what they can and cannot say,"
Fish said.
Pro-choice activists also point to
the logistical complications which
the bill, if passed, will pose for
women seeking an abortion. They
say that if women have to return to
the clinic for a second visit, .those
who live far distances from the

clinic will face extreme inconve-
niences.
"The bill is a form of harass-
ment," McLean said. "If passed,
many women will be required to
take off an extra day of work and to
endure unnecessary travel time."
Sue Derengoski, chair of Students
for Life, believes that the bill, if
passed, will allow women to make a
more informed choice.
"The bill will not directly af-
fect abortion rights; it will only
force women to explore their deci-
sion more carefully," she said.
Derengoski also said the waiting
period would prevent any hasty de-
cisions.
"It's a great bill because it al-
lows women to sort out their feel-
ings before rushing into anything,"
she said.

Ap
S

DON'T
KNOCK
IT*** until you've tried it.
Write news for the Michigan Daily. Orientation meetings
held every Sunday at noon (Come in the back door).
r.

U I

The Film Editor: Rough Cuts & Final Prints
Evan Lottman
will show film clips and discuss how he moved from rough cut to
final print on Presumed Innocent. One of America's most respected
film editors, Mr. Lottman's credits include The Exorcist, Sophie's
Choice, Apocalypse Now (first cut), The Muppets Take Manhattan,
Orphans, and Presumed Innocent among others.

Where are my Doan's?
Freda Delosh, a member of the Memorial Garden Committee, pinches the

s fbacks of the geraniums at the First
SEUSS
Continued from page 1
Seuss' impatience with pacifist
sentiment in America in the midst
of a world war.
Seuss continued to include sub-
tle messages on issues important to
him throughout his career: from
The Butter Battle Book, which of-
2ered a parable for the atomic age,
tp his personal favorite, The Lorax,
,an environmental saga that ends on
-a note of hope when a single truf-
,';Jula tree seed survives, and a plant
1"looms.
Each summer, Seuss' stories
,lower when Ann Arbor's Top of
;tihe Park cinema program packs oo-
dies and oggles of fans onto the
Power Center's roof as strains of
star bellied Sneetches and beaches
float through the air. And each
December, puddles and piddles of
students blow off .studying for
their final exams to catch campus
showings of The Grinch Who Stole
Christmas.
When LSA junior Deborah
,Grayson heard the news of Dr.
Seuss' death last night, she de-
,clared, "Side Mazie, a lazy bird
;hatching an egg, 'I'm tired, I'm
bored and I've kinks in my legs!'
That's how I would have felt about
my childhood if it weren't for Dr.
Seuss. I would have had kinks in my
legs.
"What child did not think when
T
5.1 '

United Methodist Church yesterday.
they made a mess a cat in a hat
would come a clean it up? What
child did not dye their eggs and
ham green?" Grayson asked.
Similar sentiments echoed
through the Union MUG, where
LSA senior Anthony Harelson re-
membered reading The Cat in the
Hat to his godson just a few days
ago, and LSA junior Julie Kieffer
remember the chapeaued kitty as
her nightly bed time story.
Had Seuss heard Kieffer's bed-
time tale, he might have riddled,
"99 zillion, 9 trillion and two
Creatures are sleeping so ...
How about you?"
When Seuss went to bed
Tuesday night, it was 99 zillion, 9
trillion and three.
We'll miss you Dr. Seuss, you
made each one of us a "me."

Napoli Pizza
THURSDAY SPECIAL

OPEN FOR LUNCH 7 DAYS A WEEK 1214 S. UNIVERSITY
MON - SAT 11:00 AM TO MIDNIGHT AT THE GALLERIA
SUNDAY NOON TO MIDNIGHT 741-1200
DELIVERY STARTS AT 4:00 PM
" :V..........
Vti

Runyourown
coinpanyat26.
We're looking for a few good college students and graduates who
can fill the shoes of a Marine Corps officer. That's a pretty tall order.
It means leading other Marines. Being responsible for their
well being. But that's something no civilian job offers you at 26.
If you think you're a real company man, see your
Marine Corps Officer Selection Officer for details.
1-800-MARINES.

..
p,
ft.S.
ftf ~

U.S. Department of State
Monday, September 30
6-7:30 pm
Angell Hall
Auditorium C
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
IN
U.S. Government Foreign
Affairs

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