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September 12, 1991 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1991-09-12

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily-Thursday, September 12, 1991

Inmate
fatally
shoots.
DETROIT (AP) - Wayne
County Sheriff's investigators have
not yet determined how a county
jail inmate obtainedI a semiauto-
matic handgun he used to fatally
shoot a sheriffs sergeant yesterday.
Sgt. William Dickerson was
killed after a Detroit man produced
A weapon in his cell as he was being
prepared for transfer to the State
Prison of Southern Michigan at
Jackson, Wayne County Sheriff
Robert Ficano said. The inmate was
sentenced Tuesday to a life term for
first-degree murder.
Dickerson, a 23-year department
veteran, is the first deputy killed in
the line of duty in the history of the

Mentors ti
first-year s
by John Morgan

Dickerson

Wayne County Sheriff's
Department, Ficano said.
The incident began yesterday
about 4 a.m, Ficano said. When a
deputy escorting the inmate from
his cell reminded him to bring his
belongings, the inmate produced a
handgun. Sgt. Dickerson came upon
the situation while making his
rounds. The inmate fired and hit Sgt.
Dickerson in the chest.
The deputy managed to lock the
inmate in the cell, where he re-
mained until police persuaded him
to turn over the gun about 7:20 a.m.,
Ficano said.

This fall, first-year students
participating in the University
Mentorship Program will have an
opportunity to meet older students
and faculty members like they
never have before.
By pairing first-year students
with a junior or senior student and
a member of the faculty, the pro-
gram aims to give students some-
one to consult when they have
questions and provide them with a
person who takes an interest' in
their activities and well-being.
The program was developed in
order to foster a "sense of commu-
nity" among first-year students,
said Juliette Cherbuliez, an assis-
tant coordinator of the program
and a mentor herself.
Student mentors have one
mentee while faculty mentors are
assigned five students. Creators of
the program attempted to diversify
the mentee groups ethnically and
geographically, said Cherbuliez.
Mentors are required to contact
their mentees at least once a month,
either individually or in a group.
Mary Ann Swain, Vice
President for Student Services,
originally conceived the program
as part of a series of initiatives to
improve undergraduate education,
Cherbuliez said.
Since the mentors and mentees
will have their first official meet-

o assist
itudents
ing at a dinnerin the Union on Sept.
15, many people involved in the
program said they currently know
very little about it and were unable
to comment.
Cherbuliez said the success of
the program is dependent upon
"the mentee's perception that the
program will be beneficial to
them," and on "whether the
University judged the mentees''
needs correctly."
Cherbuliez said that the re-
sponse so far has been "incredible."
Approximately 1,400 first-year
students are enrolled in the pro-
gram, and 145 staff have volun-
teered, Cherbuliez said.
The 26-member Mortar Board, a
senior honor society, is the only
student group that has pledged its
support and sponsorship for the
program, she said.
However, Bert Hornback, an
English professor, recently re-
signed from the mentorship pro-
gram because of objections to its
funding. He feels the money could
be spent more effectively else-
where..
"It's a great idea," he said.
"It's something we should have
been doing for years for all enter-
ing students. What I object to is
the amount of money being spent
on a program that shouldn't re-
quire a budget at all."

COSTS
Continued from page 1
12 other schools. When all 12 uni-
versities demonstrated unallowable
costs, more than a hundred other
schools, including Michigan, were
notified of possible investigations.
Audits began at the University
in April, and results were leaked to
the press Tuesday. But University
administrators have disputed most
of the $300,000 in expenditures that
the government is questioning.

CHARGES
Continued from page 1
of General Administrative and Gen-
eral Expense costs. This 15 percent,
added to percentages for other re-
search costs such as land improve-
-ments and library expenses, totals
the University's indirect cost recov-
ery rate of 57 percent. Therefore,15
percent of the $2 million - or
$300,000 - is reimbursed by the
Federal Government and is being
disputed.
Harrison said the University did
not agree that this $300,000 was ac-
counted for incorrectly. When asked
if the University had mismanaged
funds, Harrison denied the charge.
"We have been dead honest," he
said. "We did not submit these costs
for any reimbursement. No one
questions whether the costs are
proper but if they should be al-
lowed in the... cost reimbursement
process. Anything we do we stand
behind."

Although it is too soon to pre
dict the implications of the repdrt
for the University, officials in the,
congressional Office of Manage-
ment and Budget (OMB) are debat-i
ing a cap on the amount of money:
universities can claim as indirect
costs. One proposal would set
indirect cost recovery rates for all:
universities at 26 percent.
"Under the new OMB proposal
(we) would stand to lose $6-12
million if we did nothing about it,"
Vice President for Government Re-
lations Richard Kennedy said.
Farris Womack, vice president
and chief financial officer, said the
reason costs such as the Rose Bow*
expenses get included is due to the
way the expenses are totaled. Eah
office submits its total expenses for,
the entire year.
"During the course of negotia-
tion, we recognized that there are
items which by a transaction 4o
transaction basis would not be ac-
ceptable," Womack said.
Womack defended the Univer
sity against charges that this situa-
tion was similar to the one at Stan-
ford University, where auditors
found the school had included a
yacht as part of the indirect cost re-
covery rate.
Vice President for Government
Relations Richard Kennedy said he
thought the findings would not
harm state and national appropria.'
tions for the University.
"I think that if properly exr
plained we can ease any legislator's
concern about this type of issue,"
Kennedy said.

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Groups recruit new
members at Festifall*

AVINGS ON BIG JOBS
FOR ALL CLUBS,
BUSINESSES, AND
ORGANIZATIONS.
PRINTING CENTER
401 E. HURON ST.
769-0560

by Jennifer Silverberg
Festifall, a gathering of student
organizations sponsored by the
Student Organization Development
Center (SODC), will take place to-
morrow from 11 a.m. until 4 p.m. on
the Diag.
Each group will staff one or
more tables in the hopes of
attracting new members to their
extracurricular organization.
SODC Assistant Coordinator
Leslie McKnight said approxi-
mately 175 organizations, including
sports clubs, student publication
groups, minority and ethnic groups,
academic and professional groups,
student services, Greek organiza-

tions, international and religious'
organizations, service honorary
groups and the University Activity'
Center plan to participate.
SODC, which expects several
thousand students at Festifall, wil
have an information table near the
flag pole between the old'
Chemistry Building and the Natural
Science Building. Organizers of the~,
event will be wearing hot pink T
shirts and will be passing out maps
showing where each organization is
located on the Diag.
In case of rain, SODC will decide
by 9 a.m. Friday if the event will-
continue. A rain date has been set for
Sept. 20.

Election bureau: don't
count on Engler recall

I.

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SIie ltcbrgau ?Bail
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terms by studentsatthe University of Michigan. On-campus subscripton rateforfallinter91-92 is $30;
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Subscriptions must be prepaid.
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ADDRESS: The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1327.
PHONE NUMBERS: News (313) 764-0552, Opinion 747-2814, Arts 763-0379, Sports 747-3336,E
Circulation 764-0558, Classified advertising 764-0557, Display advertising 764-0554, Billing 764-0550.

LANSING, Mich. (AP) - The
petition drive to recall Gov. John
Engler fell woefully short, failing
to get half the signatures it needed,
according to figures released
yesterday.
Leaders of The Committee to
Recall Governor Engler said last
Friday they had gathered 641,142
signatures. That was only one more
than it needed to force Engler to
submit to a recall election.
The group launched its effort
May 20, saying Engler should face a'
recall because of budget cuts to
welfare and other programs..
The Bureau of Elections checked
the petitions and found the group
turned in only 381,818 signatures
and 76,104 were thrown out because
they were more than 90 days old.
Another 1,098 were rejected

because they were on invalid forms,
leaving the group with only 304,616
signatures, or 336,525 short of the
minimum.
Chris Thomas, director of the
Bureau of Elections, said eaci
signature is checked on recall
petitions to make sure it is valid.@
That means the group would have
lost even more signatures if that had
been done.
"That 304,000 figure is the most
generous number they're going t©
get," he said. "They're not even
close."
Thomas estimated the state spent
$6,500 on doing its initial count and
analysis of the signatures. Tha
count was required by law, even
though "when we looked at the
amount of paper last Friday, wb
knew it was very short."

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