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September 11, 1991 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1991-09-11

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The Michigan Daily -Wednesday, September 11, 1991 - Page 3

GEO
discusses
" contract
r oposal s
by Lynne Cohn
baily Faculty Reporter
About 100 GEO members dis-
cussed contractual bargaining issues
w last night at their first membership
11 meeting of the year.
Although no proposals were
brought to a vote, GEO leaders col-
lected surveys from members about
what each feels are the most impor-
tant bargaining issues. They will use
information from the surveys at
Friday's mediation session with
lJniversity negotiators.
University TAs have been work-
ing without a contract since April.
GEO bargainers are sticking with
five contractual positions:
establish a 50 percent tuition
waiver for TAs who work less than
10 hours;
clearly define TA expecta-
Aions and include all class prepara-
"Lion work in total hours;
ii c: plan for a two-year salary in-
.crease at 6 percent each year;
U limit class size to 35 students
ithe first year and 30 the second year,
uand;
continue to allow a 40-day
grievance period.
GEO and the University have al-
ready agreed on a few other issues
.%such as outlawing discrimination
,against HIV-positive TAs, provid-
a "ing better information about who is
part of the University bargaining
'Wunit and extending the amount of
'time a TA has to register com-
plaints to 40 days after the conclu-
sion of a term.
Suggested actions ranged from
'organized work stoppages to strik-
" ing immediately.
GEO Organizer Phillis Engle-
bert said the union has already
started making preparations for a
,strike committee.
"It's one of the most exciting
. events of the union," she said.
"The University is not giving a
good deal to graduate students,"
GEO Vice President Amy Polk said.
"If it gets worse, then the kind of
-students who come to graduate
school and teach undergrads gets
worse."
,. John D'Arms, dean of the Rack-
hJiam School of Graduate Studies,
(.said, "They're employees, they're
'students, and they're colleagues.
"I wish the University could
reward the students in a matter that
didn't require bargaining," he said.
-r"There's more than an economic re-
lationship here."

I

Surveys: Local

job

market still sagging

By JoAnne Viviano
Daily Staff Reporter
Students looking for work in the
Ann Arbor area will still be strug-
gling to find positions, according to
reports released earlier this month
from two employment survey
groups.
Both the Michigan Employment
Security Commission (MESC) and
Manpower Temporary Services pre-
dict no significant changes in the
city's sagging job market.
"Statewide, we're not looking
for any significant changes in the
near future. There may be some
change in the fall due to the auto in-
dustry beginning its 1992 auto
year," said Norman Isotalo, com-
munication spokesperson for
MESC.
Ann Arbor and Saginaw were the
only two of Michigan's 12 major
labor market areas which showed an
increase in jobless rates in July.
"With state and local schools ei-
ther closed or on reduced summer
schedules, government employment
was down in the Ann Arbor area,"
said MESC Director Robert
Edwards. "In addition, there were
job losses among area eating and
drinking establishments and some
layoffs in automotive-related facto-
ries."
"As the fall term begins, the
situation should correct itself at the

University level and in local
schools," Isotalo added.
Findings reported earlier this
month from a survey conducted by
Manpower Temporary Services
agree with MESC reports. Local
employment projections for this
'Companies are down-
sizing. They're not
able to hire on perma-
nent employees. A
year ago we were
looking for good appli-
cants. This past
quarter, we had many
good applicants
unable to find work'
-Sallie Reeve
Manpower Ann Arbor
year's final quarter reveal that 27
percent of businesses interviewed
intend to add staff, while 17 percent
foresee workforce reductions.
"The outlook three months ago
was slightly better when 23 percent
planned to add personnel and 10 per-
cent predicted staff cutbacks," said
Sallie Reeve from Manpower's Ann

Arbor office.
"Companies are down-sizing.
They're not able to hire on perma-
nent employees," she added. "A year
ago we were looking for good appli-
cants. This past quarter, we had
many good applicants unable to find
work."
However, area business managers
and employees claim job openings
are available. Carol Hanke, a mem-
ber of the management staff at
Brooks Fashions in Briarwood
Mall, said, "the last couple months
have been better. We've been hiring a
lot lately. It seems like we needed
people all summer."
"Compared to last year,
(business) is just as well, or maybe a
little bit better," she added.
Paula Bates, assistant manager at
Bachrach Clothing in Briarwood
Mall, agreed. "We have been hiring
quite a few people lately. Business
is pretty much the same as last
year."
"Generally, I think the economy
of this town is up," said School of
Music alumnus Darren Kelly who
makes up part of the waitstaff at
Cottage Inn. Kelly said the restau-
rant has been short on staff for
months.

BRIAN CANTONI/Daily
One false move and...
Architecture junior Darin Daguanno meticulously completes his drafting
in the architecture studios.

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MSA hears budget gripes
Assembly also protests new infrastructur-e ma intenance fe

NOW OPEN IN'

THE GALLERIA FOOD COURT

a 7 y va 1.1a 11 is a s aadr va aal arrasa taa a a v v a.. \,sY v a a

by Purvi Shah
Daily MSA Reporter
Although the official debate on
the Michigan Student Assembly's
budget has not started, the assembly
heard heated comments on the pro-
posed budget.
Also, in response to the Univer-
sity's new Infrastructure Mainte-
nance fee, the assembly unanimously
passed a resolution calling on the
state legislature to provide the
funds for the University's infras-
tructure maintenance and for the
Board of Regents to withdraw the
fee.
The proposed MSA budget for
next year would increase funds to
Student Legal Services (SLS) by 9
percent and cut 46 percent in aid to
the Ann Arbor Tenant's Union
(AATU).
SLS representative Doug Lewis
argued that they need $8,000 more
than the proposed allocation in or-
der to keep up with inflation.
"We're in a time on this campus -
in this country - where your legal

rights are in question," Lewis said.
"Student Legal Services is ex-
tremely important to all the stu-
dents on campus. It's also one of the
most underfunded on campus."
Law Rep. Michael Warren said
although SLS provides important
services, the budget should not be
increased. "Under the budget re-
straints, we need to keep it the way
it is," Warren said. "A small cut
shouldn't decrease the services, but
it should increase the efficiency."
The plan to cut the AATU bud-
get drew even more emotion.
"For every 10 we talk to, there's
about 50 tenants that benefit from
us," said AATU employee Jeri
Schneider. "The kind of budget cut
proposed would really hurt us. In
the end, the people that are going to
suffer are students."
The AATU has come under at-

tack from many assembly members
for its use of funds. "They have his-
torically abused their position by
spending funds on issues which do
not relate to students and tenant's
right and they've also.been extra in-
efficient in the use of funds," said
Warren.
"I think the tenant's union pro-
vides a good service and I think a lot
has arisen because of their newslet-
ter," said LSA Rep. Kim Watson.
Welcome
Students!
- DISTINCTIVE COLLEGIATE
HAIRSTYLING for Men & Women
- 6 HAIRSTYLISTS
DASCOLA STYLISTS
Opposite Jacobson's + 668-9329

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I,

a

Gorbachev opens first

Nor..-

rights forum in U.S.S.R.
r MOSCOW (AP) - Mikhail S. to transfer power into the hands of
Gorbachev, opening the first human the republics. The KGB secret po-
~rights conference ever held in the lice, which terrorized generations of
,_Soviet Union, promised yesterday to Soviet citizens, is being revamped.
do all he could to end decades of Gorbachev called for early rati-
human-rights violations and guaran- fication of treaties reducing conven-
tee individual freedoms. tional forces and strategic weapons,
"You have come to the capital of and urged the West to provide
~a thousand-year-old state which is greater help in the transition to a
entering a new era in its history," market economy.
the Soviet president said in his The ministers of the 35 CSCE
,keynote address to the Conference member nations voted unanimously
on Security and Cooperation in to admit the Baltic republics of
Europe. "The greaf Eurasian democ- Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia.
racy will become one of the bul- Their foreign ministers took
warks of the new world." seats in an international forum for
In the wake of the failed hard- the first time, sitting at the large
line coup, the Communist Party's oval table with representatives of
grip on power has been broken and every country in Europe, plus the
the Soviet government reorganized United States and Canada.
Corrections
The photo of Playboy model Tracey Phillips, which ran on Sept. 5, was
taken by Patrick Adams Photography.
Yesterday's editorial on coursepacks stated that materials published be-
fore 1916 are exempt from copyright laws. The actual date is 1922.
THE LIST
What's happening in Ann Arbor today

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Meetings
U-M Rowing Team, mass mtg. Union
Ballroom, 8 p.m.
Engineering Council. First-year en-
gineering students encouraged to at-
tend. 1500 EECS, 7 p.m.
&% - - 1I - Aa-

rector. Museum of Art, 8 p.m.
"Introduction to Ethical Theories,"
Elizabeth Anderson. 1005 Dow Bldg,
3:30-5 p.m.
Introduction to Career Planning
and Placement. CP&P Library, 3:10.

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