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September 05, 1991 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1991-09-05

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Page 8-The Michigan Daily-Thursday, September 5,1991

MSA to hold alcohol forums

by John Morgan
This October, the University
will be holding its first ever cam-
pus-wide Alcohol Awareness Week
(AAW) in an effort to combat al-
cohol abuse. Sponsored by the
Health Issues Commission of the
Michigan Student Assembly, the
event will take place between Octo-
ber13and 18.
Scott Gast, the coordinator of
AAW for MSA said in the past,
campus fraternities and sororities
held AAW individually. This year,
the Intrafraternity Council (IFC)
will be one of more than 25 Univer-
sity and community organizations

to sponsor the event.
This year's AAW theme will be
"Who's Calling the Shots?" It was
developed in response to a recent
University Task Force on Alcohol
and Other Drugs report that cited
the lack of programs at the Univer-
sity aimed toward prevention.
Organizers of AAW said they
will try to show how alcohol abuse
relates to other student problems,
such as stress and sexual abuse.
Joseph Owsley, the director of
News and Information Services,
said, "We support the concept... we
want people to be aware of the
dangers of alcohol."

Tuition rates fal 1991
School or Fall Fall Percent
College 1990 1991 Change
LSA*
Resident Lower Division $1,743 $1,865 7
Resident Upper Division $1,929 $2,064 7
Non-resident Lower Division $5,997 $6,419 7
Non-resident Upper Division $6,433 $6,886 7
Engineering
Resident Lower Division $1,813 $1,940 7
Resident Upper Division .$2,065 $2,311 11.9
Non-resident Lower Division $6,057 $6,483 7
Non-resident Upper Division $6,599 $7,166 8.6
Business Administration
Resident $2,015 $2,156 7
Non-resident $6,549 $7,010 7;
Law
Resident $3,967 $4,505 13.6
Non-resident $7,934 $8,492 7
*LSA fet includes all schools and colleges except Business Administration,
Engineering, Law, Medicine, Dentistry, Pharmacy Graduates, and Kinesiology
Upper Division and Graduates.
Above fees do not include a $50 infrastructure maintenance fee assessed on all students,

TUITION
Continued from page 1
pending on the state appropriation,
administrators could raise or lower
tuition in mid-term.
All University of Minnesota
students face a 9.3 percent tuition
increase. Moreover, the university
placed a salary freeze on all faculty
and administrators.
'Those fees closest
associated to
education are
acceptable. When you
start talking about
maintenance to
buildings, that bothers
me
- Regent Deane Baker
Indiana University raised its tu-
ition slightly more, than 40 percent
because the administration decided
to change the university's fee struc-
ture to a flat rate, instead of paying
by credit hour.

Other Big Ten universities which
experienced tuition raises larg%
than the University include Purdue
University, Penn State University'
and Ohio State University. These
Chn rnl iin rnp bvtx~o

Briarwood Mall
Lacated just three miles south of campus on State St.
A A"NG1
Students, Staff and Employees,
SAVE 15%Y
EVERYDAY/
ON OUR ENTIRE SELECTION
OF FINE JEWELRY!
At Shifrin, just show us your University of Michigan
I.D. and we'll take 15% off your purchase!*
'Sorry, does not apply to sale or previously discounted merchandise.
Briarwood Mall
JEWELERS
Use The Shifrin Charge. Convenient Terms
Available. Or Use Any Major Credit Card.

1
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scOiJ s rase tutuon rates etween. ,
8 and 10 percent.
The remaining Big Ten universe
ties held tuition increases below the, ;
7 percent increase that the regent=
approved.
Administrators at the Univer-
sity of Wisconsin also faced the
problem of an unresolved state
budget.
In-state students at Madison'
will pay $1'193.75 - a 3.6 percent:R
hike - while out-of-state students.
will be assessed $3,584.25 per term.
In order to limit the increase, capi-
tal improvement projects were put ;
on hold and salary increases were :
held to less than 2 percent, said Stu, ;
dent Services Coordinator Mary;
Anderson. mar
Northwestern University will:
raise its tuition 4.7 percent for al1"
students. Iowa University students.,
will pay 3.8 percent more in tuition0
than last year, while the University,,
of Illinois will raise its tuition by
percent.
amended its contract with th '
Shelter Association, permitting &
to remove or dismantle the house.
44
Council members said they could
not understand why officials would
conceal knowledge of contamina
tion.
"That's news to me," said M
Councilmember Robert Grady (D-'
3rd Ward), after being informed"
about the documents.

BRATER
Continued from page 1
officials suspected the land was
contaminated as far back as 1986.
A memo, dated May 22, from
former City Attorney R. Bruce
Laidlaw to Mayor Liz Brater,
states: "At the time that the city
purchased the property, it was used
in connection with an automobile
repair business. Accordingly, there
was some concern that leaking en-

gines might have caused some soil
contamination."
Laidlaw said last night that he
did not remember sending the
memo, but he added, "There was
general knowledge among council
and staff that a lot of (previous)
uses had gone on that could lead to
contamination."
Brater could not be reached for
comment.
Ann Arbor resident Bob Thorson
previously owned an auto repair

Take a study break or enjoy
an evening of quality entertainment
just down State Street to
The Movies At Briarwood

shop on the site. It had also served as
a landfill, he said. He said he sold
the property to the city in 1986 for
$65,000.
Thorson said the city knew of
possible contamination when it ne-
gotiated the transaction.
"They were saying I couldn't get
more than that on the open market
because no other developer could
build there," he said.
Thorson said that after the city
purchased the property, it moved a
waste storage tank into the shop be-
fore demolishing it.
Thorson said he attempted to
contact Brater "within two weeks"
of her victory in April to inform
her about the site.
One of his calls was detailed in
another memo, dated May 13, to
Brater from her former secretary
Peg Eisenstodt, which states:
"(Thorson) said the city told him
the land wasn't worth a lot because
the soil was contaminated and that
no structures should be built
there."
On Aug. 21, Travers Group of
Ann Arbor released a study that es-
timated a cleanup would cost
$30,000.
On Tuesday, the City Council

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Councilmember Mark Ouim
(R-4th Ward) said, "If city offer
cials, including the mayor, knew
that the site was contaminated, why
did we spend all that money to
move the houses? We could have..,
built affordable housing for les4!
than this fiasco cost us."
One source, speaking on condi-
tion of anonymity, suspected that A,
the city proceeded to move the .'
houses despite the contamination to
appease homeless activists who in
February protested the eviction of
homeless people occupying the
house.
"I think they were desperate to 00
get the squatters out of the house i
and then just put it there as a tempo- ,
rary measure - a very temporary a
measure," the source said.
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J.C. PENNEY BRIARWOOD MALL
WELCOMES YOU BACK WITH
UNIVERSITY APPRECIATION NIGHT
Sunday, September 15, from 6:30 to 9:00 p.m.
We invite you to join us this evening for FREE entertainment,
FREE refreshments, special sales demonstrations, fashion shows,
FREE givaways, FREE drawings, and much, much more!

ยข .1
. ' )
* . ."
* r

Qi

12

S.
t. **** . ,,

FIRST 1000 CUSTOMERS RECEIVES A FREE 32 oz. BEVERAGE GLASS!

.* .
*.

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