100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 04, 1990 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1990-12-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 2 - The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, December 4,1990

Calvin and Hobbes

by Bill Watterson DEPUTIZED
Continued from page 1

WHEN I GMc UP,
IO! I'M GIW
0 C E0E
MAN A1iq

BUT I RATS. TN A.T WAt'S
Wwt L ~EoRLSHPE

7J

'{ov'RE GONG MWE THEN
To BE PREM I CAN F INtSN
LARUl LN THE MS BOOK.
NUR51RG NOME.
ti
2
O
tul

I

Nuts and Bolts
So wH-~r A E !=TALKI'
" E-1:L1-51-nON CAMFAIG-N.?
AIR. WHAr AR~E
YOU &EFTrrIc,
W45LL,YOU SAY GF-ORgcE Is
COM tt"WNT $VT C'MON,* GOING
TO Stp -AUY A AA 7
HI 4SUIVIN.G, JUST BECAUSE
H I . 4Y RA-m,& 15
IN -rp-:CA..

HE 51400 SE NeC oTYA77N&
THE 1;r- E osr HosTACes
NOT RU'MN0 ELBaQS y7;{
SERVICE. MeN
WELL , T
THINK;T WAS
AbooT -nHEHE
CBOT OUT OF 7{{E
4417$ HOOSE
t _ it
e
S eKTNE '

u COT OOTOF7-E
WHITrE ose?

by Judd Winick
&oH R T.YN OUT LOUD7I
QWAYLE,GLT OF ?N
PJNT CALL HE;REANYM~ORE
OK $ ar You
STOI ' P~ANKiNG

senior and protest leader. "I wonder
why they were deputized first and
then trained. If the University had
been concerned about the training,
they would've checked the officers'
'sensitivity' before deputizing
them."
"To distinguish between the
University rhetoric and what had ac-
tually been going on is difficult,"
said Mark Buchan, a member of the
Students' Rights Commission. "It's
deceitful, but I can't say I'm sur-
prised," said the second-year
Rackham student.
Students cite many incidents
which trace the University's refusal
to release information on the depu-
tized officers' status.
At an information session on
campus security October 11, atten-
dants attest that Associate Vice
President for Business Operations
Bill Krumm said the University had
not begun deputizing officers.
By this date, eight Department of
Public Safety and Security officers
had already been selected and depu-
tized.
However, yesterday Krumm de-
nied telling students the University
was not deputizing officers. "I did

not say that. We started deputizing
officers in August. We've deputized
eight officers at this point in time,"
Krumm said.
Buchan accused Krumm of lying
at the forum. "He said it was still in
the recruiting stage and they were
going to conduct a nationwide search
for the officers," said Buchan.
Sgt. Vernon Baisden of the
DPSS Crime Prevention .. and
Community Relations Department
did not deny in mid-October that
eight officers had been deputized, but
reserved comment on the issue. He
later acknowledged their authoriza-
tion.
The officers' training is another
issue of contention. The University
reported in the Oct. 22 issue of The
University Record that DPSS had
been training the officers since Oct.
1. Prior to the release, however,
Baisden told The Daily, "We've just
about completed the process. We're
now working on choosing people."
Baisden later said he had not been
authorized to report the information
on officers' training.
Phone calls to DPSS trainees
were not returned or were referred to
Baisden, who said it was not possi-
ble to interview them.
Associate Vice President for
Governmental Relations Virginia

Nordby said there is no public inter-
est, in the police officers' back-
grounds.
"(There) has been no specific in-
cident or event involving any of
these officers which might create a
public interest in knowing that offi-
cer's employment record, discipline
history, medical records or traini
experiences," she said in a lettw
denying a request for information
under the state's Freedom of
Information Act.
The eight officers were formerly
University security officers. They
have all received college degress and
have fulfilled the necessary police
academy training required by the
Michigan Law Enforcement Officers
Training Council, Baisden said.
DPSS has already received 115
applications, many from out of
state, for the next group of six offi-
cers, who will begin training in
January, he said. "The University of
Michigan has a fine reputation for
not only academics but also for em-
ployment." he added.
All security officers applying to
be deputized are subject to an inte,
view panel made up of a representa-
tive from University personnel, a
member of the DPSS command
staff, and a member of a minority
group or a female.

_

Weekend columnist applications are due
Monday. Call Gil or Josey at 764-0552.
TEACH FIOR AMERICA
in formation session
Wednesday, December 5th
R Michigan Union, Wolverine Room
5:30 p.m.
Teach For America is a national teacher corps of
talented, dedicated individuals from all ethnic
backgrounds and academic majors who commit
two years to teach in urban and rural areas that
have persistent teacher shortages.
Applications for spring interviews must be postmarked by January 4, 1991
and are available at the Office of Career Planning and Placement
for more information, contact Chris Ordway at 769-5644

PARKING
Continued from page 1
dential, the Department of Trans-
portation and the City Council will
review parking meter installation on
a case by case basis, according to the
resolution.

--r

The resolution also states new
parking meters will not be placed in
residential areas without prior notifi-
cation of the neighborhood residents
and without the final approval of the
City Council.
The transportation department an-

ACCIDENT
Continued from page 1
were eight dead."
Gibbons stressed that authorities
were not ruling out further changes
in the death toll. "This is probably
going to go up or down all
evening," he said shortly after 7
p.m.
The DC-9, Flight 1482 to
Pittsburgh, was carrying 39 passen-
gers and four crewmembers, accord-
ing to the airline. The 727, Flight
299 to Memphis, was carrying 146
passengers.
Both flights had originated in
Detroit, according to Patrick
McCann, a Northwest spokesperson
at its headquarters in Eagan, Minn.
"Apparently the right wing of the
727 hit the aft section, the engine,
of the DC-9, taking the engine off,"
said Alan Muncaster, another
Northwest spokesperson. "That re-
sulted in the fire. That, at this point,
is all we know."
At the time of the crash, visibility

was poor and the ground was wet
from a morning snow and sleet
storm that delayed flights at Detroit
Metropolitan Airport. Muncaster
said the airport had been closed to
inbound traffic but that planes were
being allowed to take off.
Tony Dresden, a spokesperson for
the National Air Traffic Controllers
Association, said there was about a
quarter-mile visibility in the air, but
only about 800 feet on the ground.
"We've had some discussions
with our people out there," Dresden
said. "The DC-9 pilot became lost
on the runways. The pilot gave the
ground controller erroneous informa-
tion about his position and turned
right onto the runway where the 727
was taxing.
"The DC-9 pilot discovered at the
very last moment where he was, and
so the ground controller told him to
immediately get off that runway, but
it was too late."
He stressed that his information
was preliminary. The Federal
Avintinn Adiministratin which su-

ticipates a budgetary short fall in the
parking system fund, and approved
the installation of the new parking
meters to help raise revenues. The
shortfall is due to repair and mainte@
nance costs and revenue shortfalls for
city parking structures.
Investigators from the National
Transportation Safety Board were be-
ing dispatched to begin a probe
aimed at determining the cause of the
accident, a safety board spokesperson
said.
The 727 did not appear to hav
been seriously damaged in th
collision.
At Annapolis Hospital in Wayne,
seven passengers were in stable con-
dition and one in critical condition,
spokesperson Pat O'Dowd said. TwQ
of the victims at that hospital were
transferred to the University of
Michigan Medical Center Burn
Center at Ann Arbor.
At least two of the people taken
to Annapolis were Northwest em-
ployees, O'Dowd said.
Four people were in stable condi-
tion at Heritage Hoospital in Taylor,
spokesperson Barbara Nicholson
said. None of their injuries were
burns.
Muncaster said surviving passen-
gers were taken to the airport
Marriot hotel.
A family center was opened at a
Ramada Inn about a mile from the
scene.
with earlier administration pro-
nouncements. As recently as Oct.
15, Cheney himself had said the
opposite.
He said yesterday that lengthy re-
liance on sanctions would cede tv
Saddam the ability to determine fu-
ture events. "Such a policy would
give Hussein breathing space" during
which he could augment his army,
Cheney contended.
"It is far better for us to deal with
him now ... than it will be for us to
deal with him five or 10 years from
now, when the members of the
coalition have gone their disparate
ways and when Saddam has become
an even better armed and more
threatening regional superpower than
he is at present," Cheney said.

j..

AS
I I iri c

f t V I(ALV.JII FU1..LIbiaIRAC JiVU, wilc-11
pervises air traffic controllers, did
not immediately comment about
Dresden's statement.
CHENEY
Continued from page 1
we never will know whether they
would have worked," Nunn said.
Sen. John Glenn, (D-Ohio),
voiced misgivings about a "Chicken
Little approach to our policy. The
sky is falling and the only option is
war." .
Cheney spelled out in detail the
U.S. position that American and in-
ternational interests are in jeopardy
in the gulf crisis, contending that
Saddam might gain a stranglehold on
oil, that he is destroying Kuwait and
that his continued military buildup
could mean further aggression.
"It is not so clear that time is al-
together on our side," Cheney said, a
statement that appeared in conflict
bte £ibi
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published
terms by students atthe University of Michigan. Su
for two terms, $22 forone term. Campus delivery$2
$11 for one term.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associate
ADDRESS: The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard, A
PHONE NUMBERS: News (313) 764-0552, Opini
culation 764-0558, Classified advertising 764-055
EDITORIAL STAFF: Sp
Editor in Chief Noah Finkel A
Managing Editor Kristine Lalonde
News Editors Diane Cook, Ian Hoffman
Josh Mitnick, Noele Vance Ar
Opinion Editor David Schwartz B
Associate Editors Stephen Henderson, F
.dMatthew Miller, Daniel Poux M
Weekend Editors Ronan Lynch TI
Kevin Woodson
Photo Editor Jose Juarez Lis
News: Matt Adler, Chris Afendulis, Josephine Balenger, Lad Barage
Jay Garcia, Henry Goldblatt, Jennifer Hirl, Nicle James, Christine K
Pulliam, David Rheingold, Gil Renberg, Bethany Robertson, Jon Ro
Shah, Lee Shufro, Jesse Snyder, Anabel Vered, Stefanie Vines, Ke
Opinion: Russell Baltimore, Geoff Earle, Mike Fischer, Leslie Helbr
Mattson, Chris Nordstrom, Tony Silber, Glynn Washington, Meissa4
Sports: Ken Artz, Jason Bank, Mike Bess, Andy Brown, Wat Butzu,
Matthew Dodge, Josh Dubow, Jeni Durst, Jkn Foss, Jason Gomber
Lieberman, Albert Lin, Rod Loeswenthal,.Adam Miller, John Niyo, Ma
Kevin Sundman, Becky Weiss, Charlie Wolfe, Dan Zoch.
Arts: Mark Bineili, Greg Baise, Andy Cahn, Beth Cdquilt, Jenie Dah
Brian Jarvinen, Mike Kcdody, Julie Kommrn, Mike Kuniavsky, Elizabe
Uselmann, Mike Wilson, Kim Yaged, Nabeel Zuberi.
Photo: Brian Cantoni, Anthony M. Croi, Jennifer Dunetz, Amy Feld
Kenneth Sm oiler.

621 E. William St.
(above Steve's Ice Cream)
663-7012
Hours
M-F 8-8 - Sat. 8-6 - Sun. 10-5
No Appointments for Hair Care...Just Walk In!

t

lgan iailQ
d Monday through Friday during the fall and winter
ubscription rates via U.S. mail for fall and winter $39
8.00 fortwo terms. Prorated rates: $25 fortwo terms;
d Press and the Student News Service.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
on 747-2814, Arts 763-0379, $ports 747-3336, Cir-
7, Display advertising 764-0554, Billing 764-0550

I

t

13OFI
SHAMPOO.
CUT&
BLOW DRS'
Reg. $12.50
Not valid with any other offer.
Coupon expires Dec. 31, 1990.
$1 VYIPT

F4
>,
Y

15 OFF
ANY PERM
Reg. $40 & up
- Long Hair Slightly More
" Spiral Perms Not Included
Not valid with any other offer.
Coupon expires Dec. 31, 1990.

~
i
i

orts Editor Mike Gill
Associate Editors Andy Gottesman,
David Hyman, Eric Lemont,
Ryan Scfreiber, Jeff Sheran
ts Editors Kristin Pakn, Annette Petrusso
Books Cardyn Poor
Film Jon lik, Brent Edwards
Music PeteShapiro
Theater Mary Beth Barber
ist Editor Gil Renberg
er, Michelle Clayton, Lynne Cohn, Brenda Dickinson, Jule Foster,
loostra, Amanda Neuman, Shaini PaKITaml Pollak, Matt
senthal, Usa Sanchez, Gwen Shaffer, Sarah Schweitzer, Purvi
en Walker, Garnick Wang, Donna Woodwel.
unn, Jim Lacey Jr., David Leitner, Andrew M. Levy, Jennifer
Weiner, Kevin Woodson.
, Jeff Cameron, Steven Cohen, Theodore Cox, Andy DeKorte,
g, Phi Green, R.C. Heaton, David Kraft, Rich Levy, Jeff
tt Rennie, David Schechter, Eric Sklar, Andy Stable, Ken Sugiura,
kmann, Michael Paul Fischer, Gregg Raxman, Forrest Green Ill,
lh Lenhard, David Lubliner, Mike Molitor, Jon Rosenhai, Sue
man, Krissy Goodman, M chele Guy, Rob Kroenert, Jod Milman,

--4

m

WWIn

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan