100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 03, 1990 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1990-12-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily -Monday, December 3, 1990 - Page 3

Coleman Young
fails to show for
NAACP reception
by Matthew Pulliam
Daily Staff Reporter

I

Despite the absence of its guest
of honor, the University's branch of
the National Association for the
Advancement of Colored People
(NAACP) held a reception for
approximately 50 people last night
in the Rackham Building.
Detroit Mayor Coleman Young
was scheduled to speak at the
convocation on racism and the civil
rights movement, but did not
appear due to "complications," said
President of the State NAACP
Conference and LSA senior Del
Sanders.
"It is very unfortunate that
Coleman Young didn't show up,
because everyone in attendance
could have benefited from what he
had to say," said first-year
engineering student Doneka Scott.
Sanders said, "We invited Mayor
Young to campus because he's in-
volved in the civil rights movement
and is a proponent of civil rights
activism in the U.S. He was to
*address the civil rights agenda for
Chalker faces
arraignment
LSA junior Todd Ochoa will be
arraigned tomorrow at 1:45 p.m. in
the 15th District Court for malicious
destruction of property resulting in
damages under $100. The misde-
emeanor charge is for writing in chalk
on University property earlier this
month.
City Detective Douglas Barbour
said a judge will officially read the
charge and Ochoa's rights at the ar-
raignment. Ochoa will also be ar-
rested and will be issued a personal
cognizance bond. Ochoa has the op-
tion to plead not guilty, in which
case the judge will schedule a pre-
Otrial conference. If he pleads guilty,
the judge will set a sentencing date.
The maximum sentence for the
charge is $100 and/or 90 days in jail.
Profanity leads
woman to kick
man in groin
A woman told Ann Arbor police
Friday that a man was following her
and another woman on the second
floor of the Central Campus Recre-
ation Building. The complainant said
the suspect tugged on the other
woman's clothing and called them
"bitches."
She said she pushed him away,
and he then did the same, resulting

the '90s and what we as students
should be doing."
The reception included hors
d'oeuvres, drinks and informal
discussion.
Young's absence did not dampen
the spirits of the audience.
"Although Young did not show,
the efforts of the NAACP were not
wasted, because I decided to join,"
said first-year engineering student
Galanda Brooker-Dobbins.
The organizers of the reception
encouraged students to mingle and
associate rather than go home.
NAACP flyers were displayed in an
effort to bring attention to the
organization.
"We are working to fight the in-
justices and the discrimination that
we see on campus, and we are
trying to create a more hospitable
atmosphere for students of color,"
said Keith McKee, an LSA junior
and the president of the University
NAACP.
in their throwing punches at each
other. The fight ended when she
kicked him in the groin.
The man told city police he had
bumped into the women and called
one of them a "bitch" after she
pushed him first. He said they then
exchanged punches.

Walesa
fight, pa
by Lee Shufro
Daily Staff Reporter
Lech Walesa may have to fight a
tough battle to win the Polish presi-
dency, said speakers at a symposium
last Friday.
The symposium, sponsored by
the Center for Russian and European
Studies, addressed the race between
longtime Solidarity leader Walesa
and his closest running opponent and
political novice Stanislaw Tyminski
for Polish president to be decided on
Dec. 9.
"I'm scared we may have a fruit-
cake in the palace," said Business
School Prof. Marian Krzyzowski, re-
ferring to the rise of Tyminski who
received 23 percent of the Nov. 25
vote which failed to produce a major-
ity winner.
Lech Walesa received nearly 40
percent of the vote while current
Prime Minister Tadeusz Mazowiecki
received 18 percent. Because no can-
didate received a majority, a runoff
election will be held Dec. 9.
Mazowiecki, the first non-com-
munist prime minister in the East
bloc, has stepped down as prime
minister and will not run in the elec-
tion.
The "emergence of Tyminski is
very disturbing," said Director of the
Center of the Russian and East Eu-
ropean Studies Roman Szporluk.
"He is clearly a very dangerous phe-
nomenon."
Sociology Prof. Michael
Kennedy described Tyminski as "the
white knight from across the ocean"
because of Tyminski's sudden return
to Poland after spending 21 years in
Canada and Peru where he made mil-
lions.
"I'd like to know about how

o face
nel says
Tyminski made his fortune," said
engineering sophomore Paul Sier-
adzki. "After all, he did live in
Peru."
Krzyzowski, an editor of the Pol-:
ish newspaper Studium Papers, ex-
plained how Walesa manipulated the'
Polish Parliament into authorizing
elections.
"He bulliedthe Parliament int.:
an election. He knew he was destabi-
lizing Poland's road to recovery. It-
was his grab for power," Krzyzowski
said.
Mariusz Ziomecki, editorial
writer for the Detroit Free Press,
expressed concern about the validity
of the election.
"This election was a comedy of
errors with sudden twists. I am
scared to death that Tyminski will
win. Certainty is gone."
Graduate student John Slyce did
not think Tyminski will win but
expressed concern over the en-
trepreneur's success in the initial
election. "Clearly Walesa will win.
The question isn't who will win the
election but rather who lost. Clearly
the nation of Poland lost."
Roman Szporluk analyzed the
election from a historical perspec='
tive. "Communism demoralized the'
Polish people. Several generations'
have no experience with normal life.,
Before communism was Nazi occu-
pation. Poland has still not found its
soul or its place in Europe. It has no
identity," Szporluk said.
Krzyowski emphasized that the
Polish parliament made a'
"monumental error" by holding elec-=
tions before a new constitution was
drafted. "Every Polish constitution.
has been written either for or against
an individual. I am afraid this wilt
happen again," Krzyowski said.

BRIAN UANTiNUiaily

Tie one on to help
LSA sophomore Jessie Underhill ties on her Galens Day Tag. All
proceeds from the tag sale go to help hospitalized children in
Washtenaw County.

Police reports said the two parties
involved did not want prosecution,
and the man sought medical atten-
tion.
Police stop armed
man near campus
Two Ann Arbor police officers
stopped a man Nov. 28 on the corner
of S. Fifth Ave. and E. William
after receiving a tip that the man was
armed.
The officers conducted a pat down
search and found a six-inch knife on
his person, in addition to three rocks
of crack and a pair of scissors. The
suspect, who had two other warrants
for his arrest, is charged with pos-
session of cocaine and carrying a
concealed weapon. He was trans-
ported to Washtenaw County jail on
account of a felony warrant for
breaking and entering an auto and

*e Correction
The Chicago Style hot dog restaurant is located on East University. This
information was misreported Friday.
,THE L ST
What's happening in Ann Arbor today
Attention all groups that make submissions
to the List or the Weekend List:
Beginning in January, the List in Weekend Magazine will in-
clude performances, movies and other entertainment events for the
entire week, Friday through Thursday. For this reason, we ask that
you submit such items at least one week before the issue of
Weekend in which you want your item to run.

was held for another warrant, a mis-
demeanor from state police for carry-
ing an open intoxicant. The case is
open pending authorization.
Man charged with
assaulting spouse
A man was arrested for felonious
assault after the complainant told po-
lice her husband struck her in their
apartment on the 700 block of Madi-
son yesterday morning. Police re-
ported they found the woman bleed-
ing severely in the forehead. The vic-
tim told police her husband had
struck her in the head with a beer
bottle during an argument. Wit-
nesses in adjacent apartments said
they heard the fight and knocking
against a wall.
University Hospital officials told
police the victim suffered a broken
nose and possibly a concussion.
The man was not found in the
apartment but was located in the area
and transported to the county jail. He
was released at judicial review, pend-
ing further investigation.
Glass mug used in
friends' dispute
Police arrived at the scene of a
crime Nov. 28, finding a man bleed-
ing from a wound in the back of his
head resulting from a fight with a
friend.
Police reports said two friends
got into an argument Nov. 28 when
the suspect asked the victim to leave
his 500 block S. Division apart-
ment. The suspect reported to Ann
Arbor police that they had been
drinking, and when he asked the
complainant to leave, the com-
plainant refused. A struggle resulted
near the door as the resident tried to
kick out his friend. The suspect said
he grabbed a golf club because he
was fearful of the friend's intoxica-
tion level. They then wrestled and
the victim took the golf club,
whereby the suspect grabbed a glass
mug and struck the victim in the
head four times, police reports said.
The suspect was arrested for felo-
nious assault and was transported to
the police department. The victim
said he did not desire prosecution.
Four youths
assault man
A man reported to Department of
Public Safety officials and Ann Ar-
bor police Nov. 29 that he was as-
saulted on the corner of S. Univer-
sity and Church Street. The victim
said four males aged 17-18 pushed
him to the ground and then took
turns hitting and kicking him. The
man said he did not know the sus-
pects or their motive. He was later
treated at the University hospital
emergency room.
A witness told police he saw the
four youths drive away in a white
Mercury Lynx. Police have identified
the license plate number and the reg-
istered owner of the car but have not
made any arrests. The victim told
police he desires prosecution.
Police pursue
campus prowlers
Police observed two male sus-

ing on the 300 block of S. State at
2:41 a.m. yesterday. A resident re-
ported the suspects banged on his
skylight. Police have suspects.
U A resident on the 1000 block
of Baldwin reported to police she
saw a subject walk toward a window
of her home Saturday night after 11
p.m. She said she yelled, and the
man walked away. Police were
unable to locate the suspect.
Campus area
break.ins
An apartment on the 1000
block of Vaughn was broken into
Dec. 1, according to police reports.
A resident reported she heard noise in
a hallway and a chain rattle. She told
Ann Arbor police she got up, turned
on the lights, and found nobody. In
the morning she found the kitchen
door unlocked and open three inches,
stopped by the security chain.
Nothing was reported stolen. Po-
lice believe the unknown entrant
used a key.
Police have two suspects for
an illegal entry of an apartment on
the 700 block of Arch St. Saturday
morning. The resident reported the
thieve(s) entered through a door,
probably using a key and took his
VCR. The resident also told police
he believes one of the suspects, both
of whom had been living in the
apartment until two weeks ago, has
a key.
- by Josephine Ballenger
Daily Crime Reporter
kiunko's
COPIES
with is ceooo
8 11/2 X 11, white, self serve or auto fed only
expues 1/1/91
Open 24 Hours
540 E. Liberty
761-4539
1220 S. University
747-9070
Open 7 Days
Michigan Union
662-1222

COLLEGE

STUDENTS!!

HYUNDAI COMPUTERS OF AMERICA
OFFERS WHOLESALE COMPUTERS TO

TO POSITON HYUNDAI ELECTRONICS IV A MORE AGRESSIVE
POSTURE IN THE EDUCATIONALARENAHYUNDAI OFFERS TiE
COMPUTERS FOR STU)EWI WHOLESALE PURCHASE PROGRAM
TIS PROGRAM IS FOR FULL TIME S7UDENT TEACIERS
FACULTY STAFF AND ThEIR FAAMIM (SCHOOL I.M REQUIED)
HRDES WHAT YOU GET
* 1991/HYUNDAI SUPER 286E W/40 MEG HARD DRIVE
* 14" VGA COLOR MONITOR 31 DOT PITCH
* 101 KEY KEYBOARD
* MS DOS 3.3 & GWBASIC
* MICROSOFT WINDOWS WRITE
*18 MONTH FULL MANUFACTERS WARRANTY
PLUG IT IN AND GO!
LIST PRICE $2995.00
TYPICAL RETAIL $217500
STUDENT TEACHER PRICE $1565.00
O P z1mYr z Ar.nzmAh$20:: oo0
VISA/MASTER CARD ACCEPTED
NATIONWiDE CALL 1-800-666-7237 (ORDERS ONLY)
INFORMATION LINE CALL 305-792-8086
7RANSCONTNENTAL SERVICES INC.
6741 WEST SUNFISE BLVD.
PLANTATION FL. 33313

Meetings
UMASC (University of Michigan
Asian American Student Coalition),
weekly meeting. For info, Weston
Woo (995-7008). 2439 Mason Hall,
7:00.
Circolo, The Italian Conver-
sation Club, weekly meeting.
MLB Fourth Floor Commons, 3:00.
Indian American Students As-
sociation, weekly meeting. Union
Tap Rm., 8:30.
Undergraduate Philosophy Club,
weekly meeting. 2220 Angel Hall,
6:00.
Revolutionary Workers League,
weekly current events study. E.
Quad, 52 Greene, 6:00..
Women in Communications,
Prof. Joan Lowenstein, speaker.
Frieze Bldg., Rm. 2050, 5:00.
Speakers
"The Canaanites: New Pros-
pectives on History, Culture
and Society," Prof. Neils Peter
Lemche of University of Copen-
t._._------ ,.,.- DA D,

"Landscape in the Mist," film
by. Theodoros Angelopoulos, Hel-
lenic Student Association. Michigan
Theater, 8:00.
"Technology and Women,"
seminar conducted by Susan Jenkins
of Women's Studies. 1005 Dow
Bldg., 3:30-5.
Furthermore
Safewalk functions 8-1:30 am
Sun.-Thurs., 8-11:30 Fri.-Sat. Call
936-1000 or stop by 102 UGLi.
Northwalk functions 8-1:30 am
Sun.-Thurs., 8-12 Fri.-Sat. Call 763-
WALK or stop by 2333 Bursley.
ECB Peer Writing Tutors avali-
ble to help with your papers Sunday-
Thursday, Angell/Haven Computing
Center, 7-11:00.
U of M Shorin-Ryu Karate-do
Club. For info call (994-3620). Ev-
ery Monday, CCRB, Small Gym, 8-
9:00.
Open Reading Night, authors
reading from their own fiction and
poetry. Guild House, 802 Monroe
St., 8:30.

thel Csl'1IiA"ACSB Minim Summer

Business schools face a critical shortage of minority professors. According to current estimates.
by the year 2000, 28 percent of the college-age population will be Black, Hispanic and Native
American, while less than 3 percent of business processors will be from those groups. The Graduate
Management Admission Council-American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business Minority
Summer institute, to be held June 9-July 19, 1991, at the University of Michigan, is intended
to increase the number of minority students pursuing the Ph.D. and careers as business school
faculty.
The institute will bring together 30 talented Black, Hispanic and Native American rising college
seniors in order to introduce them to the challenges and rewards of the career of a business
professor. Applicants will be considered from a variety of academic disciplines, including
economics and other social sciences, humanities, education, engineering, and business. Previous
study in business is not required. The program provides the following financial assistance to

UI

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan