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November 21, 1990 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1990-11-21

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, November 21, 1990

Calvin and Hobbes

ByOill W°en° U' hosts program to raise
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minority representation

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by Shalini Patel
Daily Staff Reporter

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by Judd Winick
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For the second year in a row, the
University will host the Minority
Summer Institute, a program de-
signed to increase African-American,
Latino, and Native American repre-
sentation among business doctoral
students.
The institute is scheduled to take
place - and will undergo a review
process - in June and July.
William Broesamle, president of
the Graduate Management Admis-
sion Council (GMAC), said of U.S.
citizens who graduated from business
doctoral programs in 1989, only 2.2
percent were African- American, .7
percent were Hispanic/Latino, and
none were Native American. GMAC
administers business graduate school
admissions tests.
The program, sponsored by
GMAC and the American Assembly
of Collegiate Schools of Business
(AACSB), will accept 30 juniors and
seniors, the same number as last
year, from colleges and universities

everywhere.
In six weeks, students participat-
ing in the summer institute will take
two classes - one in economics,
the other in organizational behavior
- and receive a stipend of $2,500.
"This program is not limited to
business school students," said
George Siedel, the business school's
director of affirmative action and a
professor of business law at the
University. "We're very concerned
about this national shortage."
"We also view this as an oppor-
tunity to introduce students to
Michigan," he added.
Last year, a national committee
accepted 19 African-Americans, 10
Latinos, and one Native American
into the Minority Summer Institute.
Asian-Americans and other mi-
norities are already well represented
in doctoral programs at business
schools, Broesamle said.
Minority faculty from the Uni-.
versity, in conjunction with faculty
from schools all over the country,

will teach at the institute. Last yet
the dean of Tuskeegee University and
the associate dean of Texas A&M
participated in the program.
"Michigan was selected from ten
competing schools for the opportu-
nity to host the institute," said Broe-
samle, who would not release the
names of the other schools. "It was
chosen for three reasons: the signif
cant number of minority faculto
members, its good doctoral program,
and the general support of the busi-
ness school and University adminis-
tration."
Of the 144 business school fac-
ulty, five are African American and
17 are Asian American.
The Minority Summer Institu,
will cost approximately $1.5 miw
lion for three years, the bulk of
which is paid by GMAC and
AACSB. The University pays ap-
proximately $.2 million, according
to Siedel.

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Assembly
Attendance
The following Michigan Student Assembly
members were present for opening and
closing roll call at last nights meeting:
Angie Burks (LSA)
Sreenivas Cherukuri (Engin)
Lynn Chia (LSA)
Scott Chupack (Engin.)
Paula Church (LSA)
Bill Cosnowski (Engin)
Corey Dolgon (Rac kham)
Charles Dudley (LSA)
Brian Johnson (Engin)
Aberdeen Marsh (LSA)
Liz Moldenhauer (Art)
Paul Oppedisano (Pub.
Health)
Susan Richey (Pharmacy)
Rob Reilly (LSA)
Lisa Schwartzman (LSA)
Jonathan Uy (Med.)
Jennifer Van Valey (LSA)
Hunter Van Valkenburgh
(LSA)
Aaron Williams (Engin)
The following Michigan Student Assembly
members were absent for either opening or
closing roll call at last night's meeting:
Mary Aitken (Nat Res)
Stephanie Andelman (LSA)
Amy Arnett (LSA)
Tony Barkow (LSA)
Matt Benson (Business)
Stephanie Brown (Nurs.)
Melissa Burke (LSA)
Jennifer Dykema (LSA)
Jeff Gauthier (Rackham)
Steven Kahl (Business)
Michael Kline (Rackham)
Steve Koppelman (LSA)
John Lapins (Architecture)
Mike Marderosian (Dentistry)
Steven McKelvey (Lib. Sci.)
Ken Miller (Rackham)
David Nacht (Law)
Marci Powers (Ed.)
Sundar Ramasamy (Med.)
Joe Sciarrotta (LSA)
Peter Speer (Business)
Alene Taub (Music)
Tun Thwin (Rackham)
IFC
Continued from page 1
The passing of this ban is associ-
ated with a major goal of the IFC
this year - preserving the fraterni-
ties' relationship with the adminis-
tration.
The proposal to ban open parties
has been debated for several terms,
leading to the Hectorians Meeting
Nov. 2 when 36 of the 37 fraternity
presidents in attendance voted to
support the ban.
MSA
Continued from page 1
"It may make some votes more
conservative," he said. "Action
doesn't fall in a block as much (as
CC)."
MSA President Jennifer Van
Valey, who was elected on the
Action ticket winter term, expressed
optimism about next term's assem-
bly, but expected fighting between
members of different parties to con-
tinue plaguing the assembly.
"I think that there will be more
political infighting," she said.
Both Van Valey and Dolgon ex-
pressed hope that MSA would con-
tinue to work for the students.
"I think this semester proved
MSA can do a lot," Dolgon said,
citing the work of the assembly's
committees and commissions.
Dolgon speculated that the work
- done by the assembly was not re-

Detroit census tops
one million mark

DETROIT (AP) - Volunteers
scouring Detroit for people missed
by the U.S. Census counters helped
push the city over the magic 1 mil-
lion mark needed to retain big-city
political clout and federal and state
dollars, Census officials said
yesterday.
Officials have estimated that
falling below 1 million would cost
Detroit about 16 percent of its an-
nual operating revenue of $1.9
billion.
Preliminary Census figures re-
leased in August estimated the city's
population at 970,000, a tally city
officials challenged, sending out
volunteers to search every street for
uncounted Detroiters.
NATIONS
Continued from page 1
sounding "No."
French President Francois Mit-
terand likened the new Europe to
"yesterday's utopia."
Mitterand asked the delegates to
"ensure that each of the states pre-
sent here enjoys a special quality of
relationship based on equality of
rights, security, and solidarity."
He spoke favorably of an elimi-
nation of chemical and biological
weapons, the reduction of nuclear
weapons, and the hope that "disputes
be settled peacefully through concili-
ation."
In praising a new Pan-European
movement towards democracy,
British Prime Minister Margaret
Thatcher suggested that the delegates
"establish a great alliance for democ-
racy.
"That would be the best guarantee
of all for our security," Thatcher
stressed. "Democracies do not go to
war with each other - they have too
high a regard for freedom and justice,
not only for those in their own
country, but in each other's coun-
tries as well."
President George Bush called Eu-
rope "A continent frozen in hostility
for so long." He seemed confident
that the pledge signed here between

While the final count still isn't
in, Census Bureau Director Barbara
Bryant told Mayor Coleman Young
that the city hpd topped 1 million.
Included in the recent tally were such
people as military personnel sta-
tioned elsewhere during the first
count, Bryant said.
"It includes people who miglO
have been in a winter home on April
1. That, for example, added 22,000
people to the count," she said.
"Hooray, hooray, hooray," Rep.
John Conyers said from his office in
Washington. "The powers that be fi-
nally got the message that the op-
pressed, the homeless, and the im-
poverished don't always have phones
and houses from which to b
recorded," said Conyers.
the members of NATO and the War-
saw Pact to promise "the non-use of
force" will be heeded and long-last-
ing.
"The measures," Bush said, "will
contribute to lasting peace through
openness."
Turkey's President Turgut Ozal
concurred, stating that the new order
of security in Europe "will irre@
versibly free the European relations
from the dominance of the military
factor."
In singing the praises of the ac-
cords and the future of Europe, the
leaders also heartily endorsed the ef-
forts of Gorbachev.
"There would be no summit to-
day," said Canadian Prime Minister
Brian Mulroney, "had it not been fo.
the vision and the courage of Presi-
dent Gorbachev." Later Mulroney
added, "At great risk to himself he
opened avenues to cooperation that
consigned the East-West division of
Europe to history."
The only European nation not in-
cluded in this conference is Albania,
but it was granted observer status
and hopes to become a full membeo
of the conference before long. This
inclusion should accelerate demo-
cratic progression in a nation that
was once considered the most op-
pressive in Europe.

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