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November 20, 1990 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1990-11-20

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, November 20, 1990

GULF
Continued from page 1
Gorbachev refused to endorse the
idea.
The United States continued its
buildup by loading hundreds of
jeeps, trucks and armored vehicles
aboard the first of 20 to 30 ships
that are to sail from Rotterdam,
Netherlands, a Dutch Army spokes-
person said.

Most of the U.S. troops in the
gulf region are in Saudi Arabia.
Bush scrapped planned rotations for
them when he announce the U.S.
buildup.
"It is worth mentioning that ac-
cording to military considerations,
the percentage of attacking force to
defending force is 3 to 1," the Iraqi
News Agency said. "This means the
United States will need to mobilize a
three million-strong force with simi-
lar equipment and armament to our

forces" if it is to attack.
There was no indication of where
the extra regular troops would come
from. Iraq's army totals 555,000
regular troops and 480,000 reserves.
Iraq announced its troop buildup
a day after it said it would free the
estimated 2,000 remaining Western
hostages in Iraq occupied Kuwait
between Christmas and March 25.
Bush and Gorbachev met for a
late dinner that focused in large part
on the possible use of military force.

Last senator gives o
remarks in Keating

Calvin and Hobbes

WASHINGTON (AP) - Sen.
Dennis DeConcini directed a fiery at-
tack yesterday at the Ethics
Committee's special counsel, accus-
ing him of relying on "lies and alle-
gations and hearsay" to build a case
that the Arizona Democrat improp-
erly assisted former savings and loan
operator Charles Keating.
DeConcini abandoned his nor-
mally low-key style and often raised
his voice to a shout as he denied
wrongdoing and defiantly said of
lawyer Robert Bennett: "He stands

here as a prosecutor... He wants a
victory. He wants to nail some-
body."
Bennett "wants another trophy on
the wall," said DeConcini. He was
the last senator to give his opening
statement in the Ethics Committee
hearings into allegations that the
"Keating Five" intervened for the
business people because of the $1.3
million he contributed to their cam-
paigns and causes.
Sens. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.),
John McCain (R-Ariz..), John Glenn

p ening :
inquiry
(D-Ohio) and Donald Riegle Jr. (D.,
Mich.) all denied impropriety.
"The issue in this case is not
me," Bennett retorted when given a
chance to speak later in the day.
"The issue in this case is the conduct'
of the senators. That is what has
brought them here."~

IL A~ ~ ms STUFF!
ITS Too tWJCA WRK!
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" UNTt.L YOU STNI.
a)e CART DEVOURP
AN Ot'4, .,
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by Bill Watterson
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TIGER APMORISMS
DOcT CATCuA ON.

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The lawyer also ridiculed suggest.
tions by Cranston, DeConcini and,
Riegle that he was holding them to,
nonexistent Senate standards of con-
duct.

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Nuts and Bolts
F1Trvlbl F 0 YOuRccocE.
URM'Y
ARM
AND $ 10.00
- FOR "TAKING~
CAWA C

by Judd Winick

HAC
Continued from page 1
right questions."
Both Brader and Coleman said
cutbacks in federal funding caused
shortages in low-cost housing. ..
"The decision (over the houses)
has been made" and the protesting
won't change it, said Jerry
Schleicher (R-Fourth Ward).
"Everyone has a right to speak, but
there is no necessity to do it in such
an offensive manner," he said.
Schleicher didn't agree with the

HAC estimate that 1500 homeless
live in Ann Arbor. "There are only a
couple dozen real Ann Arbor home-
less. But that number might fluctu-
ate a bit," Schleicher said..
Coleman said the city needs help
putting together affordable housing
projects, and suggested the city work
together with local businesses and
University students to develop work-
able solutions.
"The city continues to build park-
ing structures when they should be
building shelters for the homeless,"
Dresser said. "This is certainly not

W4AT DO MEAN CLFANtNG
HE LOOKS CLEAN F-NCJOCH...
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NO SIR 2 MEAN
,TAKE O*' ME EtZS..

OFIl!? NO! HE M I G*IT
CATCH CO-P
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R ECYCLE the best methods to increase
recycling. But Marks also said he
Continued from page 1 hoped the city would move more
"This is a great first step (for quickly on enacting legislation.
Rachamgraduate student and
recycling) as well as a promotional Ra executive committee member of the
tool," said University Recycling Huron Valley Sierra Club Doug
director Buck Marks. Marks said he Cowherd also said he hoped the city
sees mandatory recycling and the t
proposed $1 per-bag collection fee as would move faster on recycling

our last (protest). We won't stop un1
til we see affordable housing built;"
she said.
"I've had all of my illusions shat-
tered. It's the hypocrisy (of the
Council) which bothers me. They
claim they care, but they don't give
a damn," HAC member and Geology
Prof. Mike Foote said.
"It's cold in the streets" said
HAC member Shane. "The problem
of the invisible homeless has be-
come one of the visible poor," hea
said.
issues. "It's hard to be excited afte
waiting for two years (for legislatipn
to pass) during which time the cify.
has wasted millions of dollars 00
landfill dumping," said Cowherd.
If the Council does not approve
the second reading, the whole
recycling legislation will have to go
back to the drawing board.
of law is shamelessly disregarded
elsewhere."
Many of the other leaders agreed
with the international stance againstA
Iraq and were in support of the U.S.
position.
Another issue floating around is-
the status of the Baltic republics
Latvia, Estonia, and Lithuania. Their
foreign ministers were denied
observer status to the conference, but:
received support in their absence.
Czechoslovakian President Vac-s
lav Havel supported the Baltic desire

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PACTS
Continued from page 1
Thatcher called the Helsinki agree-
ments "a tremendous encouragement
and inspiration, which helped (So-
viets and Eastern Eur-opeans) not to
lose heart." She continued by pro-
claiming that "in a very real sense,
many people in Eastern and Central
Europe can trace their new freedom
back to the Helsinki Agreements."
Prime Minister Brian Mulroney
of Canada saw the CSCE in very
historic terms, "This summit ends
the Cold War," he said, "firmly,
formally, and we hope forever."
Later in his speech, Mulroney
added, "(This summit) is the inaugu-
ration of a new Europe at peace with
itself..."
Behind the scenes, Bush soughtI
support for a U.N. resolution autho-1
rizing military force to drive Iraq
from Kuwait. Gorbachev was em-
phasizing his hopes for a peaceful;
solution.1

This treaty virtually outlaws conflict between,
European nations by declaring that NATO and;
the Warsaw Pact are 'no longer adversaries'

"I think we all need patience, but
that does not mean that we are going
to weaken or retreat" from earlier
U.N. resolutions calling for an un-
conditional Iraqi withdrawal, Gor-
bachev said.
Bush sought to deflect questions
over the differences with Gorbachev,
saying, "I'm very pleased with the
way the Soviet Union and the United
States can work together in the
United Nations. There continues to
be very open-minded communica-
tions, and I have no reason to be
anything other than very satisfied."

President George Bush called the
CSCE, "a grand turn in the course of
history."
In using this summit as a forum
to build support against Iraq, Bush
argued, "Our success here can neither
be profound nor enduring if the rule

~'0

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DOG
Continued from page 1
the python" T-shirts to Couzens'
residents.
"We're not really making that
much of a profit, we just did it more
for the fun of it," Casanova added.
Other students have not been af-
fected as positively by Dog's escape.
Traps were put in rooms all the way
up to the sixth floor.

A letter posted on one room
said, "Attention, Critter Control, my
room is experiencing a very awful
odor due to the trap. Several other
rooms that have the traps have also
complained aboutthe mysterious
stench. Please correct the problem
A.S.A.P. I cannot sleep due to the
smell."
Couzens resident and first-year
LSA student Chuck Kovach said, "I
was in my room off and on for two
weeks, and I'm relieved that it's

for observer status at the CSCE.
The summit continued yesterday
with the leaders of the European na=',
tions who have not yet spoken tak"
ing the floor.
The Associated Press con-
tributed to this report.
caught." Kovach said he spent most
of his nights sleeping next door. ;
Shannon added, "It's unfortunate:
that two people don't have the sensi-
tivity to know that a snake doesn't
belong in a residence hall and the in'.
convenience they've caused their col '*
leagues."
"I'm just glad they found it,
alive," said first-year engineering
student and Couzens resident Nicole
Breniser.
As a result of the success, the
logistics of the Blood Battle may be
published. "The Red Cross would be
interested in having that informations
for other regions," Leshock said.
However, the Blood Battle or-
ganizers are optimistic about future,
victories.

-I

Career Opportunities
at Morgan

for University of Michigan students
interested in
Operations Management
Research
Sales
Trad~ig
Please plan to attend our
infortnalion presen tation on
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A 1 Ilnajors welcone

BATTLE
Continued from page 1
However, the turn-out of new
donors was higher than expected and
without large numbers of nurses,
processing was slow, Leshock
explained.
AtnMosher-Jordan 135 out of 160
students were first-time donors.
"Nurses couldn't go any faster,"
Leshock said. "Only on the days we
were overstaffed could we fill quota.
For the future, we must have a better
ratio than 24 to one. This is the
largest drive they (Red Cross) have
all year and they can't afford to keep
stretching the nurses."
The Blood Battle surpassed quota
three times - at Markley, the
ROTC drive, and the first day in the
Union.
The recent focus on anti-
deputization activities and the crisis
in the Gulf may also have detracted
student focus on the Blood Battle,
Fry said.
"I hope it wasn't just apathy. The
students on the U of M campus have
always been dynamite," she added.
This year's Blood Battle allowed
Michigan's
BI Estok' resi
"Service that brings you to your feet'
Sandals, clogs, & shoes r
for all-weather comfort
Renair Service '663 ~164

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students to make appointments for
the first time.
"A system of scheduled ap-
pointments has never been done with
a blood drive of this scale," Leshock
said. Students were at the drive for a
maximum of one and a half hours,
instead of three hours like years
before.

EDITORIAL STAFF:
Editor in Chief
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