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November 15, 1990 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1990-11-15

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily-Thursday, November 15, 1990

Calvin and Hobbes

by Bill Watterson CHALKER

THIlS ~S lOE.ESS! NOAM A
I WPOSED TO CREATE A.
DESERT SCENEINITHIS Sl0E
BOX WHENi' I. D*tT £'E
Ktyck. W41r DESET ioolS
'Z-

I kE NEVER BEEN f A.
DESER!MOAoNDADN ~
FUN o ONAA.Q3ORS ! F
INOV' TAK(EN W. TO A DSR
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vAlA'V c*T fiN Go Om A.
ft) GET OU~T -MT WOW,8E
N. BOK? ' Ew 5JV Ly,
I'M A ABUS(I GVV
TXkRGS TO DO
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'HASTE TIME SM I
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INSTNNMEUS? G01% TO
OR .NO ?

Continued from page 1
about his activity, and informed
him that a complaint of malicious
destruction of property would be
filed with the city.
Flint could not be reached for
comment.
Ochoa said he asked how chalk-

ing could be considered malicious
destruction when taping flyers to
the ground is legal. He also said he
pointed out that chalk is not a per-
manent substance.
"Flint said that anything that
has to be cleaned up is vandalism,"
Ochoa reported.
Detective Barbour said the city
must determine the damage in order

to make a charge. Although the
chalk won't cause permanent dam-
age, Barbour said cleaning it up
costs the University at least $38 t6
pay two maintenance workers to do
the job.
Ochoa said he will find out today
if the city is going to press charge*
against him.

Nuts and Bolts
HEN.C4ECAS T YT-
WACH YOUR
NO, LOOK.

H-EY, WHAT
15 THAT?

I DON'T
T"RYIT.s

by Judd Winick
o1X MORE YEARS
YOU C A EYU

SIT-IN
Continued from Page 1
cops, no code."
In a spontaneous decision, the
candle holders marched to Duder-
stadt's house on South University
and rang the doorbell with the inten-
tion of presenting Duderstadt with
their demands.
When the door was not answered,
students once again broke into chant

To the beat of a drum and the flash of office
lights which were flicked on and off by
students inside, approximately 100 students
held candles and chanted, 'No guns, no cops.
no code'

warning Duderstadt that they would

Students planned to remain in the

be back tomorrow.

president's office overnight.

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DEPUTIZATION
Continued from page 1
vices, and improved night-time bus
service - presented at the regents'
June meeting.
The purpose of the deputized se-
curity officers, however, is not the
only source of conflict between stu-
dents and University officials.
The timing of the decision has
also become a sore spot between the
regents and student protesters.
Some students contend that Uni-
versity officials deliberately urged
the regents to approve of deputiza-
tion at their June meeting because
they knew students would not be in
town to protest the decision.
In the past, the regents have made
controversial decisions, such as tu-
ition increases, during the summer
session.
"The University claims it voted
in June for practical purposes. To

say the University lied is an under-
statement." said Corey Dolgon, chair
of Michigan Student Assembly's
(MSA) Students Rights Committee
(SRC).
University administrators counter
this argument by saying it was ur-
gent that the decision be made early
in the summer so a nation-wide
search for security officers could be-
gin.
But to this date, the only officers
being trained are those who have al-
ready been working for the Univer-
sity.
Executive Director of University
Relations Walter Harrison readily
admits the University made a mis-
take by not being more up-front
once the decision had been made.
"We should have announced in
July the full range of the (safety
programs) we were going to do,"
said Harrison.
MSA Vice President Angela
Burks said the student protest of

deputization is hurting the Univer-
sity's public relations and making
the University look bad, so "Walt is
getting uncomfortable."
Although the leaders of the oppo*
sition movement would like to have
broad student support, many students
are either hesitant or unwilling t0
participate in the anti-deputization
protests.
Some students say they simply
don't fear deputized officers.
"It doesn't bother me - the only
people it bothers are the people who*
might run into them," said LSA Se-
nior Alex Nugent.
Dolgon, however, says student
indifference demonstrates the alien-
ation and powerlessness students feel
because they have few channels by
which they can show their displea-
sure with deputization.

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WESTEN
Continued from page 1
that would be really cool."
"He's not afraid to take risks, like
in talking about certain topics that
other lecturers wouldn't touch -
like sex. He's funny," said LSA
sophomore Jeremy London.
Westen demonstrated his avant
garde style when he lectured on a
theorist who argued changing your
facial expression could actually
change body sensations. The theorist
suggested people who keep a straight
face during orgasm would experience
something very different than if they
didn't restrict their facial expres-
sions.
"We'll collect that data on
Thursday," he said with a smile. A
roar of student laughter followed his
remark.
His students remember Westen's
lectures even after final exams.
"I think the most rewarding thing
that happens as a professor is when
someone comes up to me on the

street who took my course five years
ago and says, 'I want to tell you I'm
still thinking about that stuff we
talked about,"' Westen said. "That's
a wonderful feeling when somebody
is coming away from a class and
they haven't just memorized the ma-
terial for the exam but they actually
picked up a way of thinking about
themselves and other people," he
said.
"I like how when you're in the
class, you feel like you're learning
something you're not going to for-
get after the final," said London.
Westen has been teaching Psych.
172 since 1986. He also researches
the Borderline personality disorder -
a disorder characterized by interper-
sonal instability and difficulty con-
trolling emotions and sustaining re-
lationships.
At age 31 Westen has published
more articles than his years and a
book, a chapter of which his stu-
dents are required to read. He is now
working on an introductory textbook
and several articles, two of which are
set to come out within the next six
months.
Psychology Prof. and colleague
Chris Peterson, who described
Westen as "very productive" and his
work "provocative," said he was glad
Westen was finally over thirty.
"It's intimidating to be associated
with someone so smart and so
young," he joked.
Westen graduated from Harvard
magna cum laude with a degree in
social studies and a fairly minimal
psychology background (two psy-
chology courses and an honors thesis
on the subject). Before obtaining a
doctorate in clinical psychology at
the University he went to England

for a masters degree in philosophy,
After one year of psychology gradu-
ate work at the University, Westen'
got a job as an introductory psy-
chology TA.
Nervous about preparing lectures
on a fairly unfamiliar topic, Westen,
said he spent the next summer read-
ing "like crazy trying to figure out
what the field was about."
"Actually my broadest exposui'A-
to psych had been when I was study-
ing for the psych GREs. I read ai
couple of intro textbooks theweek
before so that I could pass," he re-a
membered with a laugh.
It wasgthat summer, while read-
ing the cognitive social theorist
Albert Bandura,Westen began to re-
examine certain elements of the psy-
chodynamic perspective and to cone
sider a psychological approach inte-
grating aspects of it with cognitive
and behavioral psychology.

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Westen said he was a somewhat
alienated adolescent with long hair
a love for music, and an aversion to
school.
"I wasn't interested in school.T
was obviously at some level moti-*
vated enough to keep my grades high
but unmotivated to do anything be-
yond the absolute minimum to get
an A in a class," he said.
It wasn't until he went off to col
lege that these attitudes changed, and,
he started to enjoy academics.
Westen plans to stay at the *
University at most another two.,
years. He remained unsure of his,:
next step, saying "warm air sounds.
kind of good." Westen said he really:"
enjoys both his teaching and the stu
dents at the University.
&unUIQ
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I

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