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November 08, 1990 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1990-11-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'The Michigan Daily
Quincy
is the
world
Listen Up: The
Lives of Quincy
Jones
dir. Ellen Weissbrod

ARTS
Thursday, November 8, 1990
Company makes
even flies funny

Page 5

by Mark Binelli

""M elody stays constant and
rhythm always changes. The times
are always contained in the
rhythms." - "We Are the World"
producer and arranger Quincy Jones,
on life
LISTEN UP: THE LIVES OF
QUINCY JONES
a new documentary film about
the talented musician/producer/racial
barrier breaker
BEGINS
with an annoying title sequence
during which many many different
WORDS
are rapidly flashed up on the
screen in colorful letters, words like
RAP
BEBOP
* and
ALEX HALEY
creating a sensation similiar to
" that which one experiences when
. watching a video or a commercial
_,(and these words are interchangable
in this context)
on the popular cable television
channel
MTV.
"Outstanding. Why? Because
what he did and what he does stands
-out." - controversial rap group
member Flavor Flav, on why he
1 likes Quincy Jones
The concept should have worked.
FIRST-TIME DIRECTOR
Ellen Weissbrod interviewed a
very wide range of
INTERESTING PEOPLE
against a black background
(except for
MICHAEL
who preferred to make fascinating
S' observations such as

by Julie Komorn
W hat ever happened to the The
Old Lady who swallowed a fly?
Well, we all know that after
swallowing the fly she swallowed a
spider to catch the fly and then
swallowed a bird to catch the spider
and then swallowed a cat to catch the
bird (which all jiggled and wiggled
and tickled inside her). But what was
The Old Lady really like? What kind
of family life did she have? And how
did she get a hold of all those
animals to eat?
Fortunately, The Comedy
Company has got the answers. This
season's production by the company,
The Sound of The Big Show, takes an
inside look at The Old Lady's daily
life, and also addresses a variety of
other puzzling questions. How
would the Soviet Union's new,
kinder image affect Colonel Claw's
treatment of a rude James Bond?
What would a movie preview of
People's Court's favorite character
be like? How would one hire a
monster to scare their son? And can
the Comedy Company really pull off
a musical number?
The show's 22 sketches are a
combination of student submitted
material with work from the
producers Mike Tower and Tom

Cohen, director Jon Glaser and head-
writer Dave Kosky. This year's
talented nine-member cast was
chosen from 70 hopefuls - with
two returning actors. Glaser says,
"The excellent cast is the strength of
the show."
As the Comedy Company
embarks on its 11th year of fun and
games ("second decade" they will
proudly tell you) the show continues
to "be funny for the sake of being
funny," say the producers. There are
a couple of family sketches, a satire
on relationships (Q and U are
breaking up - oh no!) integrated
with the traditional sing-along piano
tunes to which Comedy Company
audiences have become accustomed.
Glaser says, "Its the best laugh per
dollar ratio anywhere."
So no one is completely sure
what prompted The Old Lady to
swallow the fly. But it is clear that
this year's Comedy Company will
make the entire situation a laughing
matter.
THE SOUND OF BIG SHOW will
be performed at 8 p.m. Thursday,
Friday and Saturday at the
Mendelssohn Theatre. Tickets are
$4.50 in advance ($5.00 at the door)
available at the Michigan Union
Ticket Office.

MUSICAL LEGEND Quincy Jones (the one in the BATMAN t-shirt) seems to be cruelly mocking MUSICAL
LEGEND Ray Charles (the one in the DARK SUNGLASSES), but they're actually old friends.

"We just wanted to make magic"
off-camera)
and head-spinningly interspersed
their comments with lots of neat
film footage and music, taking the
audience on a virtual
ROLLER-COASTER RIDE
through the ups and downs in the
life of a legend, which included.
THREE DIVORCES
THREE DOZEN FILM
SCORES
A NERVOUS BREAKDOWN
THE BEST-SELLING ALBUM
OF ALL TIME
AN ANEURYSM
A FEW CORNY PARTS WITH
HIS FAMILY
and, of course, Michael and Diana
singing "Ease On Down the Road."
"I hated doing The Wiz. I hated
the music and!I hated the script."
- Quincy Jones, on how he
met Michael Jackson
Admittedly, the film features an
incredible cast of thousands.
DIZZY GILLEPSIE
puffs his cheeks out a lot and
talks about Charlie Parker and is

generally very cool, as is
RAY CHARLES
who complains about a young
Quincy waking him up at
NINE A.M.
every morning because he wanted
to learn about
JAZZ MUSIC.
But, so much editing in so little
time and such loose order becomes
extremely
TIRESOME
extremely quickly, no matter how
much larger than life the people talk-
ing are or the person they are talking
about is.
"AndI said, 'Quincy who?"'
- classic crooner and militant
national anthem defender Francis Al-.
bert Sinatra, on the first time he ever
heard of Quincy Jones (who later
went on to arrange the timeless Si-
natra at the Sands album)
The constant
MACHINE GUN-LIKE BAR-
RAGE
of music and images and people
talking made for a very interesting
film

STYLISTICALLY
I suppose, but the real
PROBLEM
was that there isn't nearly enough
time for these numerous aforemen-
tioned
INTERESTING PEOPLE
(such as the Reverend Jesse Jack-
son, Ella Fitzgerald, Ice-T and the
late Sarah Vaughan, making her last
film appearance)
to say anything of
SUBSTANCE
in a five-second sound bite.
"When you say pop, that's
white, right?" - raspy voiced jazz
deity Miles Davis, on pop music
Certain moments of the film do
manage to use the rapid-fire cutting
well. One especially powerful seg-
ment features several different gener-
ations of Black musicians comment-
ing on their experiences with racism,
from Ella Fitzgerald, who nearly
breaks down while recalling the seg-
regated South, to Big Daddy Kane,
who more recently was waiting to
buy tickets when a cashier leaned
See QUINCY, Page 8

Anouilh'l

S

Miss of

Arc: radical militant

by Mike Kolody
A s long as people have thought
tales worth telling, they have found
the story of the martyr to be endear-
ing. The idea of a strong character
that represents the very best in hu-
manity, a strength to fight over-
whelming odds and ultimately pay
the highest price for his beliefs, is
an appealing one
Firmly rooted in this, The Lark
by Jean Anouilh is a drama based on
the 15th-century legend of Joan of
Arc. Joan, a poor shepherdess, re-

cieves a vision from St. Michael
which urges her to lead French
troops against the English in battle.
She valiantly does this until caught
in a web of ecclesiastical and secular
intrigue that spells her doom. Even
as she steps above her station, going
as far as getting Charles VII,
dauphin of France crowned king, and
actually becoming his mentor in a
charming role reversal, Joan is seen
as a radical to be dispensed with. She
is sold by the French to the English
where she is eventually burned at the
See MISS OF ARC, Page 7

COMEDY
COMPANY
PRESENTS

Artistry &Community
At Mannes they go together. The skills, understanding and originality
of artistry are fostered by a superb faculty in a caring and supportive
community. That's why Mannes graduates succeed.
REGIONAL AUDITIONS " CHICAGO, ILLINOIS
February 8, 1991 at Curtiss Hall, Fine Arts Building
NEW YORK CITY AUDITIONS: January 7, 1991; March 5, 6, 7, 8, 1991; May 21, 22, 23, 24, 1991; August dates
to be announced. LOS ANGELES AUDITIONS: February 4, 5,1991. DALLAS-FT. WORTH AUDITIONS: February
6, 1991.
Call 800-292-3040 or 212-580-0210 for application, audition appointment and additional information about the College.

November 8, 9, and

10 :0Opm

Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
TICKETS
$4.50 advance, $5.00 door
at Michigan Union Ticket Office
FOR MORE INFO. CALL 763-1 107

Every Thursday 6-9pm is,

STUDENT
HAPPY
HOUR

LIVE
BAND!
NO
COVER!*

The Galimir String Quartet
Felix Galimir. Violin
Hiroko Yaima. Violin
Steven Tenenbom, Viola
Timothy Eddy, Violoncello
The Mannes Trio
Hiroko Yajima. Violin
Melissa Meell. Violoncello
Diane Walsh. Piano
The Newman-Oltman
Guitar Duo
Michael Newman
L-jra Oltman
PIANO
Edward Aldwell
Arkady Aronov
David Bar-Illan
Claude Frank
Richard Goode
Jeannette Haien
Grant Johannesen
Lilian Kallir
Leon Pommers
Marie Powers
Josef Raieff
Peter Serkin
Nina Svedlanova
Diane Walsh
ORGAN and
CHURCH MUSIC
Ford Lallerstedt
McNeil Robinson
William Whitehead
TIMPANI and
PERCUSSION
Norm Freeman
Norman Grossman
Howard Van Hyning
Walter Rosenberger
HARP
Gloria Agostini

STRINGED
INSTRUMENTS
Nina Beilina. Violin
Isidore Cohen, Violin
Alexander Cores. Violin
Felix Galimir, Violin
Shirley Givens, Violin
Lewis Kaplan. Violin
Ani Kavafian, Violin
David Nadien. Violin
Aaron Rosand, Violin
Dora Schwartzberg, Wolin
Sally Thomas. Violin
Hiroko Yajima. Violin
Lillian Fuchs. Viola
Rosemary Glyde, Viola
Karen Ritscher. Viola
Steven Tenenbom. Viola
Walter Trampler. Viola
Timothy Eddy, Violoncello
Melissa Meell. Violoncello
Paul Tobias. Violoncello
Peter Wiley, Violoncello
Julius Levine. Double Bos
Homer Mensch. Double Bass
WOODWIND and BRASS
Judith Mendenhall, Flute
Thomas Nyfenger, Flute
Laura Ahlbeck. Oboe
Elaine Douvas. Oboe
John Ferrillo. Oboe
Mark Hill, Oboe
William Blount, Clarinet
Gervase de Peyer, Clor et
Peter Simenasier. Clarinet
David Carroll. Bassoon
Harold Goltzer. Bassoon
Leonard Hindell. Bassoon
Judith LeClair. Bassoon
Allen Won, Saxophone
Ranier Delntinis, French Horn
David Jolley. French Horn
Philip Myers. French Horn
Mel Broilesr Trumpet
Vincent Penzarella. Trumpet

CLASSICAL GUITAR
Eliot Fisk
Frederic Hand
Herbert Levine
Michael Newman
David Starobin
VOICE
Richard Barrett
Charles Bressler
Thomas Cultice
Peter Elkus
Bonnie Hamilton
Antonia Lavanne
Dan Marek
Marian Thompson
Theodor Uppman
SONG
INTERPRETATION
Antonia Lavanne
DICTION
Nico Castel, French
German and Italian
Kathryn LaBouff. English
OPERA
Paul Echols. Chairman
Christopher Alden
Renato Capecchi
Will Crutchfield
Joan Dornemann
Benton Hess
Valery Ryvkin
MOVEMENT
CONTEMPORARY
ENSEMBLE
Madeleine Shapiro. Director
COMPOSITION
Charles Jones
David Loeb
David Tcimpidis
Frederick Werle

CONDUCTING
Michael Charry, Orchestral
Amy Kaiser, Choral
TECHNIQUES OF MUSIC
Elizabeth Aaron
Edward Adwel
Poundie Burstein
Terry Champlin
Robert Cuckson
Leo Edwards
Steven Freides
David Gagne
Charles Jones
Ford Lallerstedt
Larry Laskowski
David Loeb
Mei-Mei Meng
William Needelman
Frank Nemhauser
Marie Powers
Carl Schachter
David Stern
Frederick Werle
HISTORICAL PERFORMANCE
ENSEMBLES
The Manines Baroque
Chamber Players.
Nancy Wilson, Director
The Mannes Camerata,
Paul Echols, Director
The Manines'-
Renaissance Band.
Benjamin Peck. Director
HISTORY and
LITERATURE OF MUSIC
Frederic Fehleisen, M.A.,
History of Music
Deborah Davis,.MMA.,M.S..
Graduate Studies
L. Michael Griffel, Ph.D. Graduate
Studies, Literature of Music
Charles Kaufman. PhD.
History of Music
Kenneth Stern, Ph.D..

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