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November 08, 1990 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1990-11-08

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Page 2- The Michigan Daily - Thursday, November 8, 1990

Calvin and Hobbes

by Bill Watterson Redistricting gains may

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secure a Democratic House

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WASHINGTON (AP) - The
Democrats' romp for control of re-
districting cements the GOP as the
House minority for the foreseeable
future and will allow Democrats to
draw local political lines to their ad-
vantage in many states.
The Democrats gained a handful
of new redistricting monopolies
Tuesday, most significantly in
Florida and Texas, which will gain
seven of the 19 House seats likely to
shift in 1992 to reflect population
shifts of the 1980's.
Only Republican Pete Wilson's
win in the California gubernatorial
race kept a disheartening day for the
GOP in the costly, decade-long redis-
tricting battle from turning to total

disaster.
"The greatest area of Democratic
victory," was Democratic Party
Chair Ron Brown's assessment of
the redistricting fight.
"Our party is very well posi-
tioned not only for 1992 but for the
rest of this decade," said Charles
Black, chief spokesperson for the
Republican National Committee.
Black's assessment was based on
the GOP's having a voice in redis-
tricting for 231 of the 435 congres-
sional districts, roughly 65 more
than ten years ago.
But given the overwhelming re-
election rate of incumbents, the true
battlegrounds are in the states gain-
ing or losing seats, an area where

Democrats clearly will have an edge.
And for most of the 1980
Republicans said their chances of b
coming the House majority an4
making inroads at the state legisla-
ture level rested on their success in
redistricting battles this year.
Overall, Democrats emerged from)
Tuesday's vote with redistricting
monopolies in 17 states. Re-
publicans control the process out-
right in just three: New Hampshir
Utah and Vermont, none of the
major redistricting battlegrounds.
Democrats also have an edge of
sorts in many of the states whero
power is shared because they contrcj
or were likely to control 74 of the
nation's 99 legislative chambers.

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DEMOCRATS
Continued from page 1
trailing narrowly in California, said,
"If the voters decide to make a
change, that's what democracy is all
about."
About 96 percent of incumbents
won re-election.

Senate Democratic Leader George
Mitchell and House Speaker Thomas
Foley, their majorities strengthened
in the 102nd Congress, went to
work on an agenda for the next two
years.
Foley said it would include "tax
fairness," as well as legislative ini-
tiatives for health care and education.

Democrats emerged from the elec-
tions with a 56-44 majority in t
Senate, a gain of one seat. They
were adding nine seats to their Hodse
majority for a likely edge of 268
167. Their major congressional dis-
appointment was GOP Sen. Jesse
Helms' bigger-than-expected re-elec-
tion in North Carolina.

U

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a-n
IN THE
MICHIGAN UNION
(LOWER LEVEL)
665*2034 G
DINE IN OR CARRY OUT
M YOUR CHOICE COUPON EE VALUABLE COUPON M VALUABLE COUPON
TWO SMALL CRAZYBREAD' Double
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$A 99 _1garlic butter and topped Crazy Crusts®
with narmeksan chee

RACES
Continued from page 1
47,000 votes. The race, with Pollack
against Republican Rich Birkett,
was marked by a similarity of the
candidates' views on issues including
abortion rights and funding for
higher education. Neither was avail-
able for comment.
'I think that it is
important for
President Bush to
have support in
Michigan'
- Brian Brown,
LSA first-year student
In the battle for the U.S.

Congress seat in Michigan's 2nd dis-
trict, Republican incumbent C .l
Pursell easily outdistanced Democ*
Elmer White and Tisch Independent
Paul Jensen. Pursell received over
76,000 votes to White's 43,147.
The number of votes Jensen received
was unavailable.
White expressed little surprise at
his defeat. "It's a heavily Republican
district," he said, "and they usually
receive about 60 percent of the
votes. I was somewhat surprised th
the student voters weren't involved.
LSA first-year student Brian
Brown expressed concern at the fail-
ure of several Republicans to gain
office. "I think that it is important
for President Bush to have support
in Michigan. I think that a Republ -
can House and Senate would provide
him that support."

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REGENTS
Continued from page 1
the University's proposal for a code
of non-academic conduct and is a
supporter of deputization.
"The main point is, how do we
make a safer campus? There are
many ways: improved lighting, vol-
unteer walking. There is a wide
range of ideas the University is try-
ing to bring forward," Power said.

Power proposes cost-cutting mea-
sures for the University as a way to
limit rising tuition costs.
McFee graduated from the Uni-
versity in 1951 with a B.A. in His-
tory and now is mayor of Battle
Creek. She has served as commis-
sioner of both Battle Creek City and
Calhoun County.
McFee said a code would be
"totally inappropriate in a University
environment" and said the issue of

MTV
Continued from page 1
Interim Vice President for Stu-
dent Services Mary Ann Swain said

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that at the meeting with UAC offi-
cials, Union officials, and security
officers held before the MTV event,
it was made clear that student ID's
would be required at the door for en-
trance in keeping with the new
safety policy.
UAC President Sarah Jackson
said because student ID's were re-
quired when tickets were purchased
for the MTV event, ID's were not
checked again at the door.
Swain said if ID's were not
checked at the door then "the plan
didn't get carried through... there was
a slip-up." Swain said she plans to
investigate why ID was not required
for entrance.
"Plans (to check student ID's at
social functions) are consistent for
Black Greek events and this one,"
Swain added.
Black student leaders, however,
contend that the University uses a
double standard in its application of
the policy.

deputization should continue to b.
evaluated and "if it proves unneces-
sary... then we will act accordingly."
On limiting tuition rises, McFee
said the regents should be "inter-
facing with the state legislature and
the governor constantly to keep
tuition down."
Power and McFee will assume
their positions on the Board in Jan-
uary.
MSA Vice President Angela
Burks said the University is
"strongly enforcing the policy on
certain groups, especially Black
groups."
Black Greek Association Presi-
dent Glenn Eden said, "The Univer-
sity is not enforcing the policy out-
side the Black Greek Association or
other Black organizations."
Another complaint of Black stt-
dents is that the cost of holding a
social event in a University facility
has risen as a result of the increased
number of security guards required
for an event
"What the University is doing is
turning the Union into a country
club because those who don't have
the economic resources, can't us
it," Burks said.
Burks said if some sort of resoli-
tion in this conflict over the safety
policy is not arrived at, "this Uni-
versity is going to see a BAM III or
IV, whichever one we're on."

You re invited!
TODAY! Thursday, November 8th
7:00pm
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" Friday and Saturday lodging in
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It's an affordable, easy-to-organize
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Crystal's Group Sales Office at
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*Rate varies with accommodations. Minimum
group size 20. One complimentary lift ticket with
every 30 paid.

I

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Progcram

EITOhIAL STAFF:
Editor in Chief
Mnaplng Editor
News Editors
Opinion Editor
AssociaeEditors
Weekend Editors
Photo Editor

Guest Speakerv
Doug Van Houweling, Vice Provost for Information
Technology, will talk about the importance of informa-
tion technology in academic and career success
Computer Animated Videos
from the Advanced Center for Computing in Art and
Design at The Ohio State University

a

Computer Music Presentation
by Dr. Stephen Rush, lecturer in dance at the School of
Music, the University of Michigan
Musical Video
by Harold Brokaw, Associate Director of Center for
Performing Arts and Technology at the School of
Music, the University of Michigan

Noah Finkel
Kristine LaLonde
Diane Cook, Ian Hoffman
Josh Mitnick, Noele Vance
David Schwartz
Sephen Henderson,
1. Mathew Wiler
Ronan Lynchi
Kevin Woodson
Jose Juarez

Sports Editor
Assodat Editors
Arts Editors
Books
Rilm
Music
steter
List Editor

Mike GilM
Andy Gottesman,
David Hyman, Ero Lemont,
Ryan Schreiber, Jett Sheran
Krisdn Palm, Annette Petrusso
CardiyniPoor
Jon Sik. BentEdwards
Pete Shapiro
Mary Bli Barber
Gil Renborg

f 10010
CRYSTAL
MOUNTAIN
RESORT
M.1 i 5 Thompsonville,
M1 49683

News: Matt Adler, Chris Afkndulus, Josephine Balenger, Michelle Clayton, Lynne Cohn, Heather Fee, Julie FosterJay Garda,
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Lee Shufro, Annabel Vered, Stefanie Vines, Ken Walker, Garrik Wang, Donna Woodwell.g
Opinion:,To od, Russel Baimnore, Mark Buchan, ike Fischer, Lesie.Heibrun, David LevinAndrew Levy, Jenniler Ma tNon,
Chris Nordstrom, Dawn Pauinsld, Tony Siber, Glymw Washington, Melissa Weiner, Kevin Woodson.
Sport Ken rtz, Jason Bank, Andy Brown, ks Bess, Watt Butzu, Jeff Cameron, Steve Cohen, Theodore Cox, Andy DeKorteM
Dodge, Josh Dubow, Jeni Durst, Scott Erskine, Phi Green, R.C. Heaton, David Kraft, Jeff Lieberman, Rich Levy, Albert Lin, Rod
Loeweniai, Adam Miller, John Niyo, Sarah Osburn, Matt Rennie, David Schechter, Ken Sigura, Eric Skdar, Andy Stabile, Dan Zoff.
Arts: Mark BineIi, Greg Baise, Andy Cahn, Beth Cokuilt, Jenie Dahlnam, Michael Paul Fischer, Forrest Green Ili, Mik Kolody, Mke
Kuniavsky, Bizabeth Lenhard, David Lubliner, Mike Moitor, Lauren Turetsky, Sue Usehmenn, Kim Yaged, NabeelZbed.
Photo: Brian Cantoni, Anthony M. Croi, Jennifer Dunetz, Amy Feldman, Krissy Goodman, Michele Guy, Rob Kroenert, Jodi htman,
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