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November 07, 1990 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1990-11-07

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The Michigan Daily -Wednesday, November 7, 1990 -Pagp 5

U~&.SENTE
WINERS.:
AL.ABAMA NEWI HAMPfSHIRE
HowerllHef i C) 8bSmith (R)
A4RKAN1SAS. NEW JERSEY
David fi'r'or D) vill Bradley (0)
}tELA WARE: NORTH CAROLINA
Joseph iden (D) Jesse Helms (R)
GEORGIA RHODE ISLAND
Sam Nunn {D) Claiborne Pell CD)
1LLINOIS. SOUTH CAROLINA........
Paul Simon ; Sta Thurmond CR)
INDIA NA ..'.... OUTH DAKOTA
Chan;:Coats} CR)arry Pressler (R)
KANSAS ...TENNESSEE
Nancy K::assebaum CR) Albert Gore (D)
KEN TUCCKY VIRGINIA
Mitch McConnell (R) John Warner CR)
MVAINE..; WEST VIRGINIA'
William.:Cohen (R) -John Rockefeller CD)
MA SSA CHUSETTS . WYOMING
,iohn fKerry(CD)Alan Simpson CR)
MICHIGAN LATE RESULTS
" Carl' Levin (C>).
MISSISIPPINOT IN AT PRESS TIME
Thad Cochran(R ALASKA
HAWAII
MVDN TAI{NA :.IDAHO
Maxt aucus (C}....IOWA
MINNESOTA
NEBRASKA NEW MEXICO
Jamries Exon (D) OREGON:

190

RESULTS

ROLL

I

3,000 vote at 'U' polling sites
Precincts report overwhelming support for Democratic candidates

by Jon Casden, Matt Pulliam, and Lee Shufro

Reflecting an image of a liberal
University community, students yes-
terday overwhelmingly voted for
Democratic incumbent candidates
over Republicans.
Polling figures indicate that more
than 3,000 voters participated in the
democratic process at University
polling stations. Most of these vot-
ers were students.
LSA Sophomore Erick Laurila
had strong feelings about voting yes-
terday. "I'm disgusted with voter ap-
athy and I don't want to be part of
it," he said. Laurila expressed sup-
port for candidates with a pro-choice
stand, as well as opposing the depu-
tization of a campus police force.
Engineering first-year student
Brian Ankrapp attempted vote by ab-
sentee ballot in his hometown of
Bloomfield Hills but was unable to
receive one in time. Though many
students utilized their constitution-
ally guaranteed right to vote yester-

day, others elected not to.
"B lanchard has screwed up the
economy, but Engler's an
(expletive). Engler would do a better
job with taxes, and Blanchard is full
of empty promises. However,
Blanchard is pro-choice and Engler is
not," said Joe Guith, an LSA first
year student who chose not to cast
his vote for either candidate. "Both
have their high points, but they're
outweighed by the low," he said.
The anti-incumbency voter sen-
timent expressed in national polls
before the election was also reflected
on campus. LSA senior Erik
Kafarski, who successfully voted by
absentee ballot in Bloomfield Hills
said, "I voted for non-incumbent
Republicans because most of the in-
cumbents haven't done anything I
have liked."

LSA junior Jeff Meyers also ex-
pressed dissatisfaction with current
office holders but felt they were
better choices than their challengers,
"I am not totally satisfied with the
job Levin and Blanchard have done,
but I voted for them because they are
the lesser of two evils."
Some students simply forgot to
vote.
"I'm not registered to vote," said
Randy Daykin, a first-year student in
the School of Music. He continued,
"I don't see the point because I don't
know the issues, and I didn't think
about an absentee ballot."
Engineering sophomore Ted Chau
said he is registered to vote, but
didn't find out in time where the
polling stations were.

Many of those who chose to
vote went one step further and 461I-
unteered to work on the recruiting
staffs of the two major partieps.
t«
While the Republican presence was
not very visible, the College
Democrats had a strong showing.
"It's freezing. If it wasn't for my
friend giving me an extra shirt, I'd
freeze my ass off," said LSA senior
and Democratic volunteer $an
Ruzumna. Ruzumna stood outside "of
the Alice Lloyd residence hall from
9:15 in the morning until 8:30 at
night encouraging passers-by, to
vote. ,

Dems vie for majority in State Senate

,.

Associated Press

ALAB~>AAoHIO
_ 6 "i t( lG a oi o iht?11ARKANSAS PEN~NSYLVANIA
Bill Clinitbio )Bob Casey D)
COLORADO RHODE ISLAND
Roy Romer.(D)iruca Su11I dlun (D)
11CONNECTICUT SOUTH CAROLINA.
.,..Lowell Weickr () Carroll Campbell R)
iFLORIDA TEN 1NESSEE
Lawto Chiles {D Ray McWhrter {D)....
GEORGIA TEXAS 1
1Zell Mfl- er (O....Anne Rchrds (M)....
ID AHO. VERMONT
Cecil Adrss tD Ricard Snelling t>.....
K1 1. 1 ANSAS WISCONSIN
Joan Finney (0) Tommy Thompson: (R) MRt~
William Schaefer D) LA E ES LT
:NOT IN AT PRESS TIME
N EW HAMPSHIR~tE .....:
Judd Gregg;R) CAIFORNIA
NEIVW MEXI tCO MASSA CHUSETS
Bruce King MICHIGAN
INNESOTA
NEYOY'RK !-1-l
Mario Cuomo CD)
' IS.H USERA E
1ist DISTRICT 10TH rDISTRICT
Jon f rlrs r M dae ap{}J Il ay Shoulders CR)< Joan Dennison (0)' I11111
2ND DISTRICT 1t H DISTRICT
Psul Jenson {() Bob Davis R)'
cCarl Pursell R) / arca Gould ()
Elmner White {b)
3RQ:Dt2TH~ DISTRIC
Brad Hiaskins;(Ri) Jim Dngeman (R) >
Howard Wolpe (D)/
. . 13TH IS.TCT_
4 r D S R~ a b r o e C li s D 1Joanne MIcFarland (0)y C arl:Edw ards (R)pr d u
147H ISTRICT
5TH DISTRICT Dennis Hertel 1D) ~t
Paul Henry (R)}V Kenneth McNealy R)
Thomas Trzybinski D)
15TH DISTRICT
6TH DlSTRICT url Atkins tR)
Bob Carr ()/ .... William Ford D)
.'7tH ISTICT 1TH DISTRICT"
Dle Kitdee (D) t Frank Beaumont R).
David Morrill (R) John Dingell (D) Vt
8TrHDISTRICT 1T.ISRC
Bo l Lnr ()James W1hte (R) Sander Levin D) Vt.
9tH DISRICT 18:...... .fTH DSTRICT
Geraldine Greene (D) Water Briggs {D)

Michigan Democrats hoped to
parlay a strong top-of-the-ticket per-
formance and voter disfavor with
President Bush into their first state
Senate majority since 1984 in yes-
terday's election:
Republicans hold a 20-17 edge in
the Senate and a Democrat was ex-
pected to fill a vacant seat. That put
the Democrats only one seat away
from a 19-19 tie and possible Senate
control on the strength of the lieu-
tenant governor's tie-breaking vote.
Democrats last had the Senate
majority in 1984, after the 1982
election which gave them a 20-18
edge. Following an income tax in-
crease in 1983, voters recalled two
senators, tilting the edge to the
Republicans.
The 110-member Michigan
House was guaranteed to get at least
18 new members in yesterday's elec-
tion.

Republican David Camp was
elected to succeed departing Rep. Bill
Schuette yesterday, and Michigan's
other incumbents were well on their
way to re-election.
Reps. Howard Wolpe (D-
Lansing) and David Bonior (D-
Mount Clemens) won easy victories
despite spirited Republican chal-
lenges.
In the 13th District, Detroit City
Council Member Barbara-Rose
Collins was heavily favored to suc-
ceed retiring Rep. George Crockett
although early, sketchy returns
showed her trailing.
Rep. Carl Pursell (R-Plymouth)
defeated Republican Raymond
Shoulders, of Detroit, the first
District.
With 139 of 364 precincts report-
ing, Pursell had 61 percent of
24,000 votes to 39 percent for
White.
In addition two incumbents on

the Michigan Supreme Court and an
Owosso attorney vying for a spot oar
the Court of Appeals held early leads
last night.
Democrats last had
the Senate majority in
1984. after the 1982
election which gave
them ,a 20-18 edge.
Following an income
tax increase in 1983,
voters recalled two
senators, tilting the
edge to the
Republicans.

With 8 percent of the prepi acts
reporting, Justice Patricia Boyle had
94,892 votes, or 35 percent, and
Justice Michael Cavanagh., hoid
74,749 or 28 percent. Botl~are
Democrats.
Former Republican U.S. S,exgate
candidate Clark Durant had 14, per-
cent of the vote, and former $~anry
County Prosecutor RepublicanfJ idy
Hughes had 13 percent.
In the 2nd District Appeals Court
race, with 7 percent of the vote' in,
E. Thomas Fitzgerald had 60 percent
of the vote, while Linda Hallmark
had 40 percent.
In other races Attorney General
Frank Kelley and and Secretarj, of
State Richard Austin moved out to
strong leads over longsh~ot
Republican Foes in early returns, last
night.
"It seems the projections are very
favorable," Kelley said,

m

Incumbent leads in
15th District race

by Lynne Cohn
Daily Staff Reporter

Thomassen said his years of judi-
cial service solicited solid, and honest

Incumbent Judge Pieter supporters.
Thomassen led his opponent 812 to "I have no problems at all running
438 early last night in the only con- against Berggren," Thomassen said.
tested district court race in Ann Arbor. "I responded to his challenge with a
Five precincts had reported by solid campaign based on good, broad
deadline, bipartisan support."
The fifteenth district court judicial Berggren prosecuted criminal cases
race was the only contested 1990 judi- for the City of Ann Arbor in
cial race in Ann Arbor. Attorney Kurt Thomassen 's court for five years dur-
Berggren challenged Judge Pieter ing which both Berggren and
Thomassen, who has served on the Thomassen felt that they had a decent
court for 22 years. working relationship, although they
Thomassen said early that he felt have not been in touch since.
very confident about the race. However, Berggren didn't like
"It is hard to beat an incumbent what he saw in Judge Thomassen 's
because that person has a track record courtroom. After arriving one-half
which voters are familiar with," hour late to work every day, he felt

Thomassen said. "People would rather
vote for the devil they're familiar with
than a devil that they do not know
very well."
Berggren agreed that it is unusual
for someone to beat an incumbent,
but he felt confident that it was a nec-
essary decision.
"I wouldn't run against a compe-
tent judge," Berggren said.
"Thomassen wasn't competent, and he
still isn't. The obvious goal is to
elect competent judges."

that Thomassen consistently proved
to be incompetent.
Berggren jokingly pledged to be on
time for work if he wins the race. His
main objective is to change the whole
way the docket is set up so that citi-
zens won't have to wait in the court-
room for their cases to be tried.
"Judges schedule many cases at the
same time," Berggren said. "This
causes people to have to wait and sit
through other cases when they
shouldn't have to.

ISRAEL

Continued from page 1
The loudest applause came when
Bomzer proclaimed that Kahane "was
a strident voice calling Never
Again,"' the slogan used by Kahane
in reference to the Holocaust.
"Tell all Arabs don't sleep so
quiet tonight," Margolis said. "We
are Jews, we are religious Jews and
we don't buy that crap of turning the
other cheek. There will be hell to
pay for this affront."
Asked if he was threatening
Arabs, Margolis said: "I use simple
English and I won't elaborate beyond

speaking of revenge; it is the time to
be speaking of peace and reconcilia-
tion," said.Rabbi Mar Angel, presi-
dent of the Rabbinical Council of
America.
"The guilty person should be
tried and punished under our laws,"
said Rabbi Irwin Groner, president of
the Rabbinical Assembly. But we
urge that no further violence be
perpetrated. This will only lead to
more violence be perpetrated. This
will only lead to more violence and
bloodshed."
The New York-born Kahane, who

U.S. Sen. Jesse Helms (R-NW. grabs hold of a Harvey Gantt supportarf
as he departs his voting precinct in Raleigh yesterday. Surrounded by
media and spectators, Helms told his opponent's supporter, "I w
appreciated someone who takes a stand, even if it is the wrong stand.'
Helms was reelected last night.
Alabama GOP Gov. Guy IA"n
N ATIONAL was in a close race with Paul Hub-
bert.
Continued from page 1 CBS projected that Democrat
Biden won in Delaware as did Paul Joan Finney would unseat Kansas
Simon in Illinois.. John Kerry won Gov. Mike Hayden.
in Massachusetts and Claiborne Pell In the statehouse races, Republi-
in next-door Rhode Island. cans Carroll Campbell won a secon~d
Among 36 statehouse races, Re- term in South Carolina and Jtudd
publican governorships in Califor- Gregg did likewise in New Heiii-
nia, Texas, Florida and Illinois were shire and Tommy Thompsoniii
at risk, probably the biggest, prizes Wisconsin.
of the year. The GOP hoped for vic- Among the Democratic incfn-
tories that would protect their influ- bents, Ned McWherter won in 1'e4-
ence in drawing boundaries for nessee, Robert Casey in Pennsylva-~
House seats that will shift to the nia, Roy Romer in Colorado- 'd
Sun Belt in 1992. William Donald Schaefer in Mao~-
In Florida, former Senator Law- land. Zell Miller was elected gobe-

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