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November 05, 1990 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1990-11-05

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Page 2- The Michigan Daily - Monday, November 5, 1990
Republicans accused of racism
in North Carolina Senate race

WASHINGTON (AP) - Democrats
yesterday accused Republicans of racism in
the North Carolina Senate race as a federal
judge scheduled an election-eve hearing on
whether the GOP's tactics are intimidating
voters.
Republican officials dismissed allega-
tions that voter mailings in North Carolina
and Texas were designed to intimidate mi-
nority or elderly voters.
But U.S. District Judge Dickinson De-
bevoise scheduled a hearing today in
Newark, New Jersey, to determine whether
the Republican National Committee is vio-
lating a 1982 consent decree that bars voter
intimidation.
The hearing was requested by the Demo-
cratic National Committee.
"What the Republican Party has done is
absolutely disgusting," Democratic party
Chairman Ronald Brown said on CBS-TV's
"Face the Nation." He accused the GOP of
trying to "intimidate the poorest and most
vulnerable voters."

The controversy has centered primarily
in North Carolina, where Republican Sen.
Jesse Helms is in a neck-and-neck race with
Democrat Harvey Gnatt, who is Black.
At issue are 150,000 official-looking
postcards that the North Carolina GOP sent
to predominantly minority Democratic
precincts.
Labeled "Voter Registration Bulletin,"
the cards read, in part, that it is a federal
crime "to knowingly give false information
about your name, residence or period of res-
idence to an Election Official.'
"We knew that in a panic Jesse Helms
would turn to this kind of tactic, just as
Republicans have done in the past," Brown
said.
Voter mailings also have been sent out
in Texas to predominantly elderly Demo-
cratic voters, encouraging them to forgo
absentee ballots.
Charles Black, a spokesperson for the
Republican National Committee, said he

had not seen any of the mailings but in-
sisted the GOP has never broken the con-
sent decree on voter intimidation.
The committee "always plays by the
rules," he said. But he added that North
Carolina has "a long history of Democrats
stealing elections." State and local leaders
"have a responsibility to take legal action
to ensure the integrity of the ballot, and
that's all that's going on there," he said.
House Majority Leader Richard Gephardt
(D-Mo.) disagreed with the Republicans.
"The campaign that Jesse Helsm is run-
ning is not a lot different than the cam-
paign that David Duke ran in Louisiana,"
Gephardt said. Duke is a former Ku Klux
Klan leader who lost in Louisiana's open
Senate primary in October.
"The message... clearly has racial over-
tones. It is clearly designed to appeal to
people's prejudice," Gephardt said on
NBC's "Meet the Press."

S
S

COMMONS
Continued from page 1
Five out of five students interviewed at
the Bangkok III stand - the only fast food
facility in the Commons - said a bar and
more fast food would be their first priorities
as far as development of the Commons.
However, Daniel Gomota, a graduate
student in the School of Engineering,
added, "I think what they need to have is a
plaee where the engineering students can in-
teract with mainstream students. We are
very secluded... The first step was the com-
puting center which draws in some LSA
students, but now we need a place where
people can relax together."

While the possibility of a bar, because
of licensing difficulties, is not an option at
this time, "it is still our goal to create a
community center type atmosphere so that
the commons are like the living room of
North Campus," explained Joe Willis, as-
sistant director of the Michigan
Union/North Campus Commons.
"We are in the middle of discussions
with UAC, working out the logistics of
setting up programs on North Campus. We
are already renting out space for dances... so
we are working on developing our pro-
gramming area, attracting more students to
accept ownership in the facility," Willis
added.
Just last week, the Student Organization
Development Center (SODC), which now

has its main office in the Union, opened up
a branch office in the Commons. "The re-
sponse to our open house was fantastic...
It's my impression that the organizations
out there are very strong... It's our mis-
sion to target what their perceived as well
as actual needs are and fulfill them," ex-
plained SODC Organizational Consultant
Beth Adler.
"Our challenge now is to do whatever
we can to deliver on our original expecta-
tion on a low or no budget type situation...
Although we feel about not having a glitzy
place as far as fast food outlets, I feel we
can take the creative energy out on North
Campus and create an environment people
can come to and feel a sense of commu-
nity," concluded Cianciola.
y Bill Watterson ISRAEL

3RIAN CANTONI/Daily
Mirror, mirror
Jamie Obeshaw and Stefani Thomas, both of Clarkston, get a better perspective on art at
the Winter Art Fair held in the Track and Tennis Building this weekend.

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Continued from page 1
longer ride a certain bus from cam-
pus which goes directly to the old
city but passes through many
Palestinian villages in East
Jerusalem on the way.
However, LSA junior Josh Kulp
emphasized that Americans at hone
should realize that daily life in Israel
hasn't changed. "I have no worries
because the Israeli army is hhind
me. I feel safer here than I do in the
streets of Ann Arbor," he said.
Parental pressure from America,
rather than student decisions, has
been the cause behind most people
leaving.
"In most cases, students leave be-
cause parents from afar experience a
deep sense of anxiety," Singer said.
"(Parents) receive mainly the gory
accounts about Israel (through the
American media), so it crowds out
the mundane and normal. Even with
the recent terrorist attacks in
Jerusalem, the violence is miniscule
compared to what happens in most
cities."
Students and counselors on the
one-year program concede that if par-
ents didn't believe everything they
read and saw in the American media,
students' decision to stay would be
much easier.
"I'm sure the media doesn't help
things; I'm sure its making the situ-
ation much worse," said Gal Avisar,
an Israeli counselor for the one-year
program and a student at the Hebrew
University.
"Students here wouldn't feel how
bad the situation is if they didn't talk
with their parents." she said. "Their
parents see and hear the media, speak
with their children who are studying
here, and don't give them much

choice."
One factor that frightened many
parents was the decision of the
Israeli government to distribute gas
masks to the general public. While
many parents at home interpreted the
decision as an acknowledgement by
the Israeli government that war was
imminent, students and citizens here
feel that the action was merely a po-
litical response to quell public fears.
"A decision to distribute gas
masks was more a gesture by the
army to try and soothe the masses,"
said Assaf Tarnapolsky, a student
from the University of California at
Santa Barbara who has already re-
ceived his mask because of his
Israeli citizenship. "I don't think the
masks will ever be of major aid to
us."
While all of Israeli citizens will
receive their own gas masks to keep

Some students themselves feef
that if the situation escalates to T
certain point, they will have no
choice but to leave. "I'm sure I'll
feel it when the time comes to
leave," said Mikhal Stein, a student
from Brandeis. "I came here to study
not to be caught in crossfire."
However, a number of students
cannot see themselves leaving any.
time during the year.
"I don't think I'd leave Israel under
any circumstances," Kulp said.
"Someday, I might want to move
here. If I can't stick with Israel, and
help during the bad times, I have no
right to be here during the good
times."
The one-year program administra-
tion has begun to take upon itself
the task of educating students about'
current events.
In addition, teachers in political

'Of course, I'm scared. The fact is that there
might be a war...You have to deal with it. It's
a taste of what the Israelis have to deal with
on a day to day basis'
- Merav Barr
LSA Junior

.. .

Nuts and Bolts
Y' KNOW AA
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by Judd Winmck
11E ENVIOR rN?'
THE 'ENVI ORMEI T

at home, American students here for
the year are on tourist visas. Their
masks are stored in buildings on
campus.
This week, students will view a
video made by the Israeli civil de-
fense authorities instructing them
what to do in case of an emergency
requiring the use of gas masks.
Even without the parental input,
mounting fears have caused many
students here to evaluate the thresh-
old at which the desire to stay and
study in a country to which many
have become quite attached will yield
to a fear of personal security.

science and related subjects will be
encouraged to share personal evalua-
tions of the situation during class,
and students will be encouraged to do
volunteer work to become more a
part of Israeli society. "I've underes-
timated until recently the deep sense
of isolation that students are feeling
from the society here," Singer said.
As for more departures in the near
future, Singer said it would be hard
to make a judgement. "Students go
through the daily exercise of taking
their temperature depending on
what's happening here, and parental
pressure back home," he said.

The Taubman Program presents . .
"Your Cover Letter
Can Sell You or
Sink You"
Jane Seamans
Systems Consultant

WeDon't
Hire Employees.
We offer opportunities to team members.
Nissan Motor Corp.
in U.S.A.
will be on campus
November 11.

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