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September 21, 1990 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1990-09-21

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Page 8 -The Michigan Daily - Friday, September 21, 1990
LSA Commttee proposes a
fourth diversity course plan

by Amanda Neuman
A fourth proposal for an LSA
graduation requirement on diversity,
in addition to the three proposals
written by the LSA Curriculum
Committee, will be considered by
the LSA faculty at two forums
scheduled during the next month.
Each proposal, if passed by the
faculty general assembly, would re-
quire incoming students in Septem-
ber 1991 to choose from an approved
list of courses addressing issues aris-
ing from ethnic or racial intolerance.
Co-author of the fourth proposal
Terrence McDonald, a professor of
history, said the faculty-written pro-
posal is "more broad" than the other
three Curriculum Committee pro-
posals. McDonald, who is one of six
authors, explained that it:
has an intellectually rigorous
content requirement, focusing on the
concept and meaning of race, ethnic-
ity and racism.

respects the integrity of the
different University disciplines. It
would require a professor to relate
the discussion of race and ethnicity
to their particular subject.
includes more areas of the
world, not just a focus on the United
States.
places the responsibility for
the initiative of courses with the
faculty. The Curriculum Committee
would make choices based on a 1-2
page proposal submitted by the fac-
ulty member.
includes in the approval of
courses people who teach University
Course 299: Race, Racism and Eth-
nicity.
provides for a full scale review
of the requirement after two years.
Both Proposal A and Proposal C,

Student Alumni Council
Membership Meeting
Sunday, September 23 at 4:00 p.m.
Alumni Center (200 Fletcher St.)
763-9755
Get Involved!

I

written by the Curriculum Commit-
tee, stipulate that courses take a
comparative perspective. Proposal A
confronts inequality resulting from
racial and ethnic intolerance. Pro-
posal C allows for a focus on racial
or ethnic intolerance and resulting
inequality.
Proposal B, also written by the
Committee, would require courses
that examine the culture and/or expe-
rience of a group that has suffered
discrimination, but does not deal
with the social issues of equality,
bias and intolerance.
Proposals A and C require
courses to deal with ethnic and racial
issues in the context of contempo-
rary American society. Proposal B
calls for a focus on these issues in
any society.
McDonald added that approxi-
mately 40 or 50 existing University
courses would meet the faculty pro-
posal if slight modifications of the
courses were made.
"This is basically about changing
a graduation requirement. It's not
about changing the context of
courses at all," McDonald said.
All four proposals may be in-
cluded under existing distribution or
concentration requirements.
The proposals will be discussed
at public forums scheduled from 4 to
5:30 p.m. Sept. 24 and Oct. 2 in
Auditorium C, Angell Hall.
Students and faculty are encour-
aged to attend the public forums,
said David Schoem, assistant dean
for students in their first and second
years.
Schoem said there will be "more
opportunity for extensive discussion
of all the issues so people have a
complete understanding of the vari-
ous proposals...and a chance to de-
bate them."
The forums will also present the
opposing position - that there
should be no requirement.

SY

JOSE JUAREZ/Daily
LSA sophomore Jeff Koch (left) and Arts school junior Robyn Burger (right) chant "No guns, no cops!" during
public comments.

COMMENTS
Continued from page 1
Rackham graduate student and
Michigan Student Assembly mem-
ber Corey Dolgon serenaded the as-
sembled crowd with a song he had
written for the occasion, dealing
with both Baker's remarks and the
prospect of police on campus.
In the song he called Baker a
"rabid foaming seething dog that's
somehow gone astray" and said that
a deputized police force will make

"busting heads and breaking arms
(a) part of being schooled."
LSA junior and MSA President
Jennifer Van Valey also spoke out
on the deputization issue, chastis-
ing the regents for ignoring her per-
sonal protests in the past.
"This time, I've brought some
friends along," Van Valey said, as
the crowd burst into cheers.
Members of the administration
refused to comment on the deputiza-

tion issue after the session was
over, but Baker was adamant in de-
fense of his controversial com-
ments.
"Free speech is free speech,"
Baker said. "People can say what
they want to say, and they should
allow me to say what I want to
say.
"It's not only personal obliga-
tion to speak," Baker said. "One has
a public obligation to speak as an
elected official."

4
*1

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Siblings Weekend
Alumni Relations
Maize & Blue Day
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And many other exciting programs
Be a part of the Michigan Tradition

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GEC#us 13 . MKE .

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Saturday, September 22, 1-7 pm
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Festivities include:
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Indoor Games
Volleyball
3 on 3 Basketball Tournament!
Come at 1pm for sign-up.
Student I.D. card mandatory.
For more info, call:
Crystal Gardner
998-7037
University of Michigan Housing Special Programs " A Unit of Student Services
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* and
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