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October 26, 1990 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1990-10-26

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily- Friday, October 26, 1990 J

Calvin and Hobbes

by Bill Watterson Bhutto refuses to concede

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ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (AP) -
A conservative coalition scored a
landslide victory over former Prime
Minister Benazir Bhutto yesterday,
likely setting Pakistan's struggling
demo- cracy on a more conservative,
Islamic course.
Bhutto, who claims her August
dismissal was a "constitutional
coup," refused to concede the defeat
of her counter-left Pakistan People's
Party in Wednesday's parliamentary
election.
She accused the army-backed,
caretaker government of large-scale
vote rigging, a charge that may be
difficult to prove.
Opponents called Bhutto a sore
loser and said the more than 2-1 vic-
tory margin by the loose-knit, right-;
wing Islamic Democratic Alliance
surpassed even their expectations. ,
In the final vote count, almost 24,

hours after polls closed, Bhutto's
Pakistan People's Party won only
45 of the 216 parliamentary races, to
105 for her opponents. The policy-
making assembly, the lower house
of the Parliament, elects the prime
minister.
The rest of the seats went to
smaller ethnic and religious parties
and independents.
"The people have given their
mandate, their verdict. Ms. Bhutto
should accept the results and prove
to the world that she's a democrat,"
caretaker Prime Minister Ghulam
Mustafa Jatoi told a news conference
Thursday.
A 40-member group of inter-na-
tional poll-watchers refused immedi-
ate comment on - Bhutto's asser-
tions of vote fraud, but said it might
discuss its preliminary findings to-
day.

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defeat, charges vote fraud

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by Judd Winick
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The group's assessment could af-
fect hundreds of millions of dollarO
in vital U.S. aid for the government
now headed by Prime Minister Ghu-
lam Mustafa Jatoi. The United
States and other Western countries
have warned they may cut off aid if
the election was rigged and Bhutto
victimized.
Poll watchers were suspicious of
some constituencies where they wit-
nessed a low voter turnout. The final
vote count showed tens of thousandA
had marked their ballots.
The winning alliance espouses
adherence to the principles of Islam,
and there is speculation it could
tighten controls on the media, and
restrict the rights of women and non-
Moslems. It also favors a closer re-
lationship with the Islamic world
and more distance from the West,
particularly the United States.
not be part of the curriculum. We're
paying a lot of money to come here,
and we shouldn't be forced to spend
our time for charitable causes."
Ken Waterman, another first-year
law student agreed. "It would be un-
fair usurpation of our right to choose
how we want to use our most valu-
able resource, our time. "

L IC .

- --I- --

PRO BONO
Continued from page 1
spoke in support of the group at the
press conference. Nader began by
saying that student interest in social
activism signifies the end of the
1980s.

Herzig said that she plans to meet
with Dean Bollinger of the Law
School to plan for the University.
There is "definitely student interest,"
she said.
First-year law student Jay Saltz-
man said, "I'm not in favor (of the
proposed requirement), despite the
fact that I'm for pro bono. It should

r

I

You'll get first hand experience in the court- it takes to be a Marine Corps Officer and
room right from the start.In three years, you lawyer, talk with the Marine CorpsOfficer
could handle more than 3,000 cases in a Selection Officer when he visits your campus.
wide variety of subjects More than 190,000
from international to con- Ih vefMarines could use
tracts to criminal law. If eyourservice.
you think you have what 19l0iokingrafewgodagme

BPC
Continued from page 1
they were misinformed complaints,"
Baumann said of assembly members'
criticisms on Tuesday.
Assembly members had two
main questions about Dudley's ac-
tion: whether it was legal under
MSA rules and whether the process
would take up an excessive amount
of meeting time.
"I would question whether that's
even in order," said Melissa Burke,
an LSA representative, adding that
MSA's meetings would last "eight
hours instead of five."
Chapter 21, section 25 of MSA's
Compiled Code states, "The BPC

will hold hearings for all groups re-
questing funds for that month before
formulating budget recommendations
for approval from the Assembly."
"I don't think this is the proper
way to deal with the problem we're
having," Burke said.
At Tuesday's meeting, LSA Rep.
Lisa Schwartzman supported the
right of a student group to address
the assembly during constituents'
time to request a funding adjustment.
Dudley argued that student groups
must follow the appeals process out-
lined in MSA's Compiled Code.
"I think it's important that con-
stituents have the right to address the
assembly," Schwartzman said,
adding that Dudley's action was

"ridiculous."
Other representatives echoed
Schwartzman's sentiments.
"It's just totally ridiculous what
Charles proposed," said Engineering
Rep. Sreenivas Cherukuri, a BPC
member, adding that meetings would
be considerably longer under Dud-
ley's procedure.
He said he understood Dudley's
frustration, but did not believe thi4
was the right way to solve the prob
lems.
Cherukuri said the purpose of the
BPC was to "lessen work for the as-
sembly" by using a small group to
hear organizations' presentations and
"hash out the details."

AI~kiew

I

This month we pay tribute to the rich cultural traditions of all Hispanic Americans and recognize the sacrifices of
our own Hispanic marines. See us on 25 October 1990 at the U of M Career Expo or call (313) 973-7070/7501
for more information.

he

0.N
Religious
Services
CANTERBURY HOUSE
(Episcopal Church at U-M)
218 N. Division (at Catherine)
SUNDAY SCHEDULE
Holy Eucharist-5 p.m. at St. Andrews
Supper-6 p.m. at Canterbury House
The Rev. Dr. Virginia Peacock, Chaplain
665-0606
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
502 E. Huron
SUN.: Worship-9:55 a.m.
WED.: Supper & Fellowship-5:30 p.m.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
(Between Hill & South University)
SUNDAYS
Worship-9:30 & 11 a.m.
Campus Faith Exploration Group-9:30
THURSDAYS:
Campus Worship & Dinner-5:30 p.m.
For information, call 662-4466
Amy Morrison, Campus Pastor
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
1300 S. Maple (at Pauline)
Pastors Kaufman, Koetsier, Lucas
FUNDAMENTAL INDEPENDENT
SUNDAY SCHEDULE
9:15 a.m., ALPHA-OMEGA
COLLEGE CLASS
Studies in the Book of Revelation
10:45 a.m., MORNING WORSHIP SERVICE
Studies in the Book of Romans
6:00 p.m. EVENING SERVICE
Studies in the Book of Genesis
1015 Michigan, off E. University
Transportation is provided from all U-M and
EMU dorms. Call Ken at 761-7070 for
more information and schedules.
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN CHURCH, ELCA
801 South Forest at Hill Street, 668-7622
SUNDAY: Worship at 10 a.m.
WEDNESDAY: Bible Study at 6:30 p.m.
Worship at 7:30 p.m.
Campus Pastor: John Rollefson.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT PARISH
331 Thompson Street
Weekend Liturgies: Sat., 5 p.m.,
S 8:30 a.m., 10 a.m., 12 noon, and 5 p.m.
Confessions, FIL 4-5 p.m.
STUDENT RETREAT
Nov. 2, 3, & 4
CALL 663-0557 for information .I
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL, LCMS
SUNDAY: Worship-10:30 a.m.
WEDNESDAY: Devotion-9 p.m.
1511 Washtenaw
Pastor, Ed Krauss-663-5560
SQUARE DANCE
SATURDAY, October 27-7:30 p.m.
at the chapel-1511 Washtenaw
All parents and student welcome!

STUDENTS
Continued from pagel
A change in students' exempt sta-
tus would cost $360 million nation-
ally. At the University level, stu-
dents and the school would pay $1.5
million each.
University Chief Financial Offi-
cer Farris Womack said short-term
implications of this cost for the
University would affect programs. In
the long run, "the stream of revenue,
of which tuition is included," would
be affected, he said.
"I hope (students) will remain ex-
empt," Womack added.
Assistant Director of the Office
of Financial Aid Al Hermsen said he
was unsure what the University's re-
sponse would be if campus-em-
ployed students were required to pay
social security.
"We could possibly increase the
students' budget," Hermsen said, re-

BUDGET
Continued from page 1
lining up against the latest deficit-re-
duction package yesterday, even as
Democratic leaders and the Bush ad-
ministration haggled over the finish-
ing touches.
It was unclear whether Michigan
Democrats would support the plan to
pare the deficit by $500 million over
five years - the latest of several

versions floated in months of nego-
tiations.
Representative David Bonior (D-
Mount Clemens) and John Conyers
(D-Detroit) and Sander Levin (D-
Southfield), said they would vote
yes. Bob Carr (D-East Lansing) said
he would vote no. The other
Democrats said they were undecided
or did not respond to requests for
comments.

'

ferring to need-based students. "Butz
then we'd have to come up with ad-
ditional funds. Funds are already very
tight this year," he pointed out.
Hermsen said he doubted the
University would be able to "fill in
that gap" created by students' reduced
take home pay this year, but that the
situation would have to "be treated
on a year-to-year basis."
The U.S. Senate and House of*
Representatives are also arguing
about the extension of the tax ex-
empt status of the Employer Pro-
vided Education Assistance. Butts
said the Senate supports the rein-
statement of the exempt status while
the House opposes it.
If the exemption is discontinued,
it will cost students $255 million
nationally.
No budget cuts are proposed fo4
other areas affecting University fund-
ing, Butts said.
"There are no programs that are
being severely cut." he explainedl.

Elektra Entertainment
invites you to the. Ann Arbor
listening party for the
new release by the Cure,
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