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October 25, 1990 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1990-10-25

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Page 2 - The Michigan Daily - Thursday, October 25, 1990

SAPAC
Continued from page 2
my ass. I stopped walking and he
passed me and I kicked him. Kick
back!" she said.
Amy, another audience volunteer,
said she was angry and full of hate
for herself and the people with
whom she grew up.
"Talk to someone that cares
about you. And for the men that are

here tonight, God bless you. There
are so many people here, it isn't the
mood anywhere else. I hope people
aren't afraid to take it beyond this
room, to dorms and classrooms."
A male survivor of sexual abuse
by a person he thought was his men-
tor said he now thinks of that person
as his tormentor.
"Yes, it happens to men. If
you're a man and a survivor, it's not
your fault. If you're a survivor, you

don't have to be ashamed," he said.
Counselors and volunteers at
SAPAC staged a narrated play of the
incidents that led up to the Michigan
state legislative law prohibiting
rapists to sue their "victims" before
the criminal case is tried.
Counselors read several poems
written by women which expressed
their feelings about femininity and
societies.

Labor Secretary

Dole

Calvin and Hobbes

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by Bill Watterson
tbji

0
resigns
WASHINGTON (AP) - Labor
Secretary Elizabeth Dole, the first
member of President Bush's Cabinet
to resign, said yesterday she was
leaving for new challenges and not
because of "totally erroneous" re-
ports she lacked influence at the
White House.
Mrs. Dole, the highest-ranking
woman in the Bush administration,
said that after 25 years of govern-
ment service, she was looking for-
ward to focusing on humanitarian
causes at her new job as president of
the American Red Cross.
She denied she was frozen out by
White House policy-makers. Aides
and union leaders have said she had
little clout at Bush's Cabinet table,

C abinet
and many labor policy decisionsa
were left to Chief of Staff John Su-S
nunu.
"I can't imagine who was saying C
this... Most definitely, I feel very
much a part of the circle that's mak- b
ing the decisions here at the White 1
House," Mrs. Dole said after an-s
nouncing her resignation with the
President at her side. 4
Mrs. Dole, the wife of Senate C
Republican leader Bob Dole, also P
denied she might use the Red Crosss
position to lay the groundwork for r
long-term political goals. h
"I'm on my way to the RedZ
Cross. I have no plans to run forC
anything," she said. Rumors have d
been rampant that she would eventu- P

post
ally step down to run in 1992 for the*
Senate seat now held by Democrat
Terry Sanford of her native North
Carolina.
She did not rule out some future
bid for elective office. "You learn in
this town never to say never," she
said.
Possible successors include,
Constance Newman, head of the
Office of Personal Management;
Rep. Lynn Martin (R-Ill.), should
she lose her bid for the Senate in the
Nov. 6 election; Elaine Chao, who
holds the No. 2 job at the
Transportation Department; and
Constance Horner, undersecretary at
the Health and Human Services De-
partment.

IWNW,-u

0m 1990 Universal Press Syndicatel

.- I I'm - I .- ..-

Nuts and Bolts

TE RpOPF7D rHE G CW.
'Ys, z F-(P 7ANEA TH-AT
THE ANTI sE-mrflc
VNAL15M PUT You.
UNDE.R AN UNRmTAE
AMOUcNT OFSTES
BEAUSE'YOU'RE. A
FtLDbUT°YO
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t*J

TO PROP oug C)-N,
VANDAL-/
4n
%lLEVON... 0

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. _ . _

by Judd Winick
YOU HAP NO R&HT!!
HEY, PEOPLE GO
TO HELL FOR
PUNCHING
CLOWNS!!
A LAWyER.

Mistake delays distribution
of new student directories

HOSTAGES
Continued from page 1
on the flight home from Iraq. He
said meals consisted of rice and stale
bread
Thompson, an engineering com-
pany manager, said he was among
15 foreigners held as "human
shields" at an Iraqi armaments fac-
tory. Saddam had kept some Western
detainees at strategic locations to
guard against attack.
"We told the guards, unless you
do something...we are going to have
a disturbance, Thompson said.

by Gil Renberg
Daily Staff Reporter
The distribution of student direc-
tories, which was scheduled to begin
today, is postponed three weeks be-
cause of the exclusion of thousands
of students.
No first-year students or transfer
students were listed in the directory
- which lists the name, phone
number, home address, class stand-
ing and school of enrollment for
each student. In addition, last year's
graduated class was not removed
ZINN
Continued from page 1
ever before that students can play a
large part in."
The speech also detailed the his-
tory of student movements. The
1930s were a period when economic
realities set in and the threat of war
became apparent.
The 1960s were a period in which
"young people came alive and helped
extradite a nation from war." In the
1980s, movements for the divest-
ment of funds in South Africa and

from the directory, which is produced
by the University's Student Publica-
tions department.
It is not yet clear how the mis-
take happened. Liz Witzler, the of-
fice coordinator for Student Publica-
tions said she received a computer-
ized tape from the University on
which all the data for this year's stu-
dents were stored. She had the data
on the tape typeset, she said, then
the directories were printed in North
Carolina by University Directories, a
company which specializes in such
the halt of CIA recruiting were some
examples of activism. Although
these weren't large movements, they
may set the stage for a great student
movement in the '90s, he said.
Zinn said he believes it is dan-
gerous for campus police to have
guns, because even small demonstra-
tions may scare officers into resort-
ing to force.
Members of the audience agreed
withr Zinn.
"I am concerned with cops hav-
ing guns on campus. Zinn made me
realize that bureaucracies tend to
solve problems by force," LSA se-
nior Richard Drake said.
"Everything he said was relevant.

publications.
Attempts to locate the source of
the error have been fruitless. No one
has decided whether the data on the
magnetic tape were wrong or these
data were extracted improperly. An
employee at the University's Data@
Systems Center refused comment.
To remedy the error, Student
Publications is printing addenda to
include the missing students. It will
be distributed with the directories
beginning Nov. 14. Directories are
available to all students for free.
It is encouraging to see that we are
not an isolated group," said MSA
President Jennifer Van Valey.
LSA junior Erika Sumoff said,
"He put so much energy into the au-
dience. He fought for the oppressed.
We are fighting for the oppressed."
Although most people were
pleased with Zinn's lecture, LSA
junior Jon Jurva said, "Zinn should
have focused more on the currents
issues now rather than reminiscingg
about the '60s'"
Zinn closed his speech with some
advice for current activists: "Don't
assume people are sleeping. They
will wake up."

I

don't be left out!.

a
' ....

SENIORS
This is it!
Here's your chance to get your picture
in the 1991 MichiganEnsian yearbook
Our photographer is back!
Get your Senior Portrait taken
October 22 through October 26
on the second floor
of the UGLi. Don't forget your
appointment and your $3.00 sitting fee!
If you have any questions, call 764-0561.

Health Care Clinic of Ann Arbor
3012 Packard Road " 971-1970

LEE
Continued from page 1
thought about going into civil engi-
neering; I thought it would be very
satisfying to build bridges, but then
I thought about how many bridges
really get built.
"I knew I'd like to make wine,
but for that I would need some capi-
tal that I just didn't have. And then
there was chemistry, which I had
done best in while in school, plus
the fact that my education would be
free while I worked as a T.A. -
something I think few students real-
ize, but that really should be a crite-
ria."
Once that decision was made, Lee
was off to the University of
Chicago, where he earned his Ph.D.
in 1985. From there Lee went on to
work as a native fellow in France
and Germany.
He returned to the United States
in 1988, and immediately began to
work at the University of Michigan,
researching solid state chemistry,
teaching Chemistry 126, and earning
almost instant respect from his col-
leagues.

"He's very bright, imaginative...
He lives for his job and is a very ef-
fective teacher," notes his colleague
Prof. D. Coucouvanis.
His laboratory work, according to
graduate student Stephen Patton, "is
really exceptional. His work in solid
state chemistry could really be Nobel
Prize-winning stuff. And he has an
ability to explain it with such sim-
plicity."
When confronted with praise, Lee
becomes quite uncomfortable.
"It can be very bad to think
you'resomething special," he com-
ments.
As far as his teaching goes, he
will accept no compliments.
"There's not a lecture that goes by
that I don't think, 'This went badly,'
or 'I did that wrong...' When you
teach 350 people, what some want is
fundamentally different from what
others need.
"It's weird. You want to work to@
see your students develop to a point
where they don't need a teacher...
You will only be able to measure if
they have learned by what they know
ten years from now."

It's For You!

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