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October 24, 1990 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1990-10-24

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, October 24, 1990

- . - . - m -

Nuts and Bolts
-TOLD U.S 7HA "PI ,JW
AND A 5v4A81rCtA PAN-MDr
ON MY PcOIR 'WAS p N1N
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FROM A CONsT1 fl or4 ssIc NH
AND VAINTEV NEVf'ACAIN'
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by Judd Winick
V-coUW Uo ANISANITY
A ME. MNOPAj

GEO forum discusses activism
among TAs, Undergraduates

by Chris Afenaulls

The current state of graduate stu-
dent activism and coordination with
undergraduates was the focus of dis-
cussion last night at a Graduate Em-
ployees Organization (GEO) forum
in Rackham's East Conference
Room.
GEO represents University-em-
ployed graduate students in work
negotiations.
Michael Kozura, a teaching assis-
tant in the Sociology Department,
compared the current situation with
that of the GEO in the mid-1970s
when undergraduates and graduate
student assistants worked together in
- a TA strike.
Kozura, who was a TA immedi-
ately after the strike, compared the
two struggles and said action and
W unity in the present situation is a
necessity.
Jonathan Simon, a former Gradu-
ate student at UC Berkeley, agreed,
"(Student movements) can't really be
successful without massive student

support."
Simon, now an assistant Profes-
sor in the University's Political
Science department, added that con-
flict between Berkeley's administra-
tion and students served to
"galvanize both graduates and under-
graduates" furthering both of their
concerns.
The discussion centered around
the importance of activism and soli-
darity in student concerns and em-
phasized the GEO and the gains it
has made for TAs.
Engineering TA Joe Tillo cited
the wage increase of 15 percent over
the past two years. Referring to the
ability of the organization's 1800
members to work together in bar-
gaining with the University adminis-
tration, Tillo said, "What really
made the difference for us was the
amount of contact."
Tillo also stressed that issues of
student rights like the current con-
troversy surrounding the deputization
of campus security officers serve to

create a "snowball effect" of actio*
against the University administra-
tion, paving the way for student
demands to be met.
He referred to the gains made by
the GEO in the highly charged, ac-
tivist atmosphere on campus in
1987.
Carol Cummings, a Women's
Studies TA, .spoke about her efforts
in creating the Alliance for Campus
Child Care, a movement designed t4
meet the needs of University gradu-
ate students with children.
Suggestions for further coopera-
tion between undergraduates and:
graduates included a call by Kozura
for the Michigan Student Assembly:
(MSA) and Rackham Student Gov-
ernment to build a coalition. Tillo
expressed hope that issues of teach-
ing quality and class size would be a.
common concern and reason for ac-
tion by TAs and students.
The event was part of MSA's
student activism week.

Hn
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'

Calvin and Hobbes
VEE DAD. I UM,~., TGRS MLMAS TRi TDGET
MASK4 LIKE. MIN1E-. 1'5 A\SK ONc, wi AN&T
YOUR AW TO I READ IT INA 900y.
PREVENT TIGER
A~TACS .

wal., I APPR.(APw
pCDW:RN,

by Bill Watters
OY, IF 10VD wO, ARgE
RATER LOOK WE WZT oF
UKE RA ASPtRNA
HAMBURGER,
8E X1 GUEST,

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t;0!

'U' group protest
Gillette products

S

.: I u .,..j II.

i __________

These people missed
Fall Fashion
last year.
Look what happened.
9
Don't let it happen
to you.
Coming Friday in
1-- Mi~g t t-1.

by Annabel Vered
Daily Staff Reporter
Trac II and Daisy razors. Paper
Mate pens. Soft & Dry deodorant.
White Rain shampoo. Liquid Paper.
These are some of the products
the Bursley Environmental Aware-
ness and Recycling (BEAR) orgahi-
zation is hoping to collect today to
protest Gillette Company's testing
of cosmetic goods on animals.
The 20-person North Campus or-
ganization is encouraging students to
drop off their Gillette products out-
side North Campus Commons from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. this afternoon and
during Bursley Residence Hall dining
hours from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.
tonight.
By sending the products they col-
lect directly to Gillette, BEAR
members hope to pressure the com-
pany into updating its testing meth-
ods, said BEAR co-chair Jeff
Flocken, an LSA senior.
"Gillette continues to use out-
dated and inhumane testing of cos-
metic goods on animals. The testing
does not prove anything considered
valuable," Flocken said.
RECYCLE
Continued from page 1

Joan Fitzgerald, Director of Pub-
lic Relations at Gillette, said, "Any
animal testing that is conducted on
behalf of Gillette is required by law.
The Food and Drug Administration
and the Consumer Product Safety
Commission require testing."
Gillette only does testing on their
new products. "It's really necessary
to minimize the risk to humans as
people misuse products, get them in
their eyes," Fitzgerald said. "Things
happen beyond our control and we
need to be able to help them out."
BEAR will provide information
on alternative companies that use an-
imal-free testing methods at the col-
lection. "There are over 300 compa-
nies similar to Gillette that use al-
ternative methods. We hope to edu-
cate people so that they can make
wise consumer choices," Flocken
said. .
One such test is LD50. Flocken,
who said the test's name stands for
"Lethal Dose 50," explained, "This
is where they inject 100 animals
with Right Guard, for example, until
fifty percent die and they then record
how much was used to inject them."
Sheldon said the city will be in-
stituting an "aggressive education
campaign" to encourage more recy-
cling.

Assembly
Attendance
The following Michigan StudentAssembly
members were present for opening and
closing roll call at last nights meeting:
Eric Baumann (Rackham)
Melissa Burke (LSA)
Angie Burks (LSA)
Lynn Chia (LSA)
Paula Church (LSA)
Bill Cosnowski (Engin.)
Jennifer Dykema (LSA)
Jeff Gauthier (Rackham)
Brian Johnson (En gin.)
Steve Koppelman (LSA)
Aberdeen Marsh (LSA)
Liz Moldenhaur.(Art)
Paul Oppedisano (Pub. Health)
Susan Richey (Pharmacy)
Jennifer Van Valey (LSA)
Hunter Van Valkenburgh (LSA)
Aaron Williams (Engin.)
Jonathan Uy (Med.)
The following Michigan Student Assembly
members were absent for either opening or
closing roll call at last night's meeting:
Mary Aitken (Nat. Res.)
Amy Arnett (LSA)
Tony Barkow (LSA)
Charles Dudley (LSA)
Lisa Schwartzman (LSA)
Corey Dolgon (Rackham)
Scott Chupack (Med.)
Stephanie Andelman (LSA)
Matt Benson (Bus.)
Stefanie Brown (Nurs.)
Sreenivas Chenikan (Engin.)
Steven Kahl (Bus.)
Gene Kavnatsky (Rakham)
Michael Kline (Rackham)
Jason Krumholtz (LSA)
John Lapins (Architecture)
Mike Marderosian (Dentistry)
Nick Mavrick (LSA)
Steven McKelvey (Lib. Sci.)
Ken Miller (Rackham)
David Nacht (Law)
Marci Powers (Ed.)
Sundar Ramasamy (Med.)
Rob Reilly (LSA)
Joe Scirrotta (LSA)
Jim.Slavin (LSA)
Peter S peer (Bus.)
Alene Taub (Music)
Tun Thwin (Rackham)
Editor's note: The Daily
will now print the
attendance at each
Michigan Student
Assembly meeting in
an attempt to inform the
student body about their
elected student
representatives.

0

40

r

"They are two different kinds of
cities... with different demographics
and different sizes," she said.

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Ann Arbor has had free monthly
curbside pickup since 1978. A poll
taken in 1989 when the mandatory
ordinance was proposed showed that
there was 83 percent support for
such a program, Garfield said.
GULF
Continued from page 1
am extremely happy, but sad at the
same time because I am leaving
many of my friends and colleagues,"
said Jack Fraser of Santa Ana, Calif.
Another American, John'
Thompson, said he was eager to see
his mother in Germany because she
is going blind. .
I'm her only child and she wanted
to see me badly," he said.
No list of the 14 Americans was
released by officials, and no other
names were available immediately.

Tbe £ir -i-an -aU
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter
terms by students at the University of Michigan. Subscription rates: for fall and winter (2 semesters)
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ADDRESS: The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
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EDITOFIAL STAFF:
Editor in Chief
Munaglng Editor
News Editors
Opinion Editor
Assocdate Editors
Weekend Editors
Photo Editor

Noah Rinkel
Kristine LaLonde
Diane CookIan Hoffman
Josh MInick, Noele Vance
David Schwartz
Sloamn Henderson,
1 Matiew m ler
Ronan Lynch
Kevin Woodson
Jose Juarez

Sports Editor
Assodate Editors
Arts Editors
Books
Rim
Music

Ike Gi'
Andy Gottesman,
David Hyman, Eric Lemont,
Ryan Sireiber, Jeff Sheran
Kristin Pain, Annette Petiusso
Cardyn P or
Jen Ek, Brent Edwards
Pete Shapiro
Mary Beob Barber

News: Josephine Ballenger, Mihelle Clayton, Heather Fee, Jule Foster, Jay Garda, Hery GdldblatJennifer Hrl, CMSdne costra,
Amanda Neuman, Shalini Patel, Melissa Peedless, Dan Poux, Mat Puliam, David Rheingold, Gi Renberg, Bethany Robertson, Jon
Rosenthal, Sarah Schweitzer, Anabel Vered, Stefane Vines, Ken Walker, Donna Woodwell.
Opinion: Tam Abowd, Russe' Baltiore, Mark Buchan,Mk Fischer, Le&.Heilu,An Mdrew Levy,aennifm Mattson,Chris
Nordstom, Dawn Paulinsi, Glym Washington, Kevin Woodson.
Sports Ken Atz, Jason Bank, Andy Brown, Mike Boss, Wat Butzu, Jeff Cameron, Slave Cohen, Theodore Cox, Andy DeKarte, Ma
Dodge, Josh Dubow, Jeni Durst, Scott Erskine, Phil Green, R.C. Heaton, David Kraft Jeff Lieberman, Rlch Levy, Albert Un, Rod
Loewenthal, Adam Miter, John NMyo, Sarah Osburn, Matt Rennie, David Schechter, Ken Sigura, Eric Sklar, Andy Stabile, Dan Zoch.
Arts:. Mark Binelli, Greg Baise, Andy Cahn, Beth Cookif, Jenie Dahiknrw, Michael Paul Flsdw, Forrest Green lltMice Kolody, Mice
Kuniavsky, FBizabeti Lenhard, David Lublier, Mike Moltor, Ronald Scat, Lauren Turetsky, Sue Uselmann, Kim Yaged, Nabed
Zubed,
Photo: Anthony M. Crol, Jennifer Dunetz, Amy Feldman, Kdssy Goodman, Kenneth Smoer,
Weekend: Phil Cohen, Miguel Cuz, Donna ladkado. Jesse Waker. Fled Zinn.

TM- M i a'inntms*n f -.3 31 R .11 riii9rfimm rn{ .'i l lIO MI X£R1.1Rn*rar >NWMTD. ITAPPt ' S: ,I

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