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October 23, 1990 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1990-10-23

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Page 2 -The Michigan Daily -Tuesday, October 23, 1990

WAND
Continued from page 1
junior Shefaali Bidani.
The demonstrators expect the
ratification of the Comprehensive
Test Ban treaty - which would

end nuclear testing - by the U.S.
Senate to be difficult, but they are
undaunted.
"It's going to take a lot of work
to get the test band treaty signed by
the United States," said Ursala

Freimarck of Women's Interna-
tional League for Peace and Free-
dom, a pacifist organization that has
been working for peace since the
First World War.

Student-made

video

may be used in classes

TRAINING
Continued from page 1
work would require additional fund-
ing.
Safewalk and Northwalk, escort
services which were not included in
the article but which students have
demanded be expanded, has improved
their services this fall due to in-
creased demand, but also have not re-
ceived increased funding.
"We need increased funds to keep
both going," said Trish Olson, LSA
senior and co-coordinator of North-
walk.
Harrison acknowledged that the
safety services have not yet been
given more money, but said "it's our

intention to increase their funding."
The Record's article is a second
step in the University's effort to in-
form the community about increased
safety measures, particularly deputi-
zation.
In a letter to students' parents
dated Sept. 27, University President
James Duderstadt stated "... we plan
to expand and strengthen our Univer-
sity security staff to provide better
and more systematic coverage of the
campus area."
Corey Dolgon, Rackham graduate
student and chair of the Michigan
Student Assembly's Students'
Rights Commission, criticized the
president's letter and the Record ar-
ticle as propaganda pieces.

"The pressure was on them to do
that because we kept exposing
them," he said. SRC has continu-
ously criticized the University for
not making safety improvements
other than deputizing the campus se-
curity force.
"My question is why has it taken
them so long to improve lighting,
to increase emergency phones, to in-
crease bus service, when it has taken
only a few months to (begin police
officers' training)?" Dolgon asked.
Dolgon also asked, "Why didn't
the task force (on campus safety and
security) look into the question of
whether campuses with police forces
had increased safety after deputiza-
tion?"

._. . .. ._

MW
by Doug Padian
A video on cultural awareness
created last semester by students in
the Nursing School may be used in
University classes to encourage dis-
cussion about discrimination, say
creators of the video.
The 45 minute video, entitled
Listen To Me, addresses the difficul-
ties many University students have
with discrimination and prejudice.
The video contains interviews with
students and clips of notable events
including the 1963 Civil Rights
March on Washington and footage of
John F. Kennedy and Martin Luther
King Jr.
Assistant Nursing Professor Terri
Allor, who oversaw the video's pro-
duction, said it could be used in
courses satisfying the new diversity
requirement passed last month by the
LSA Faculty General Assembly. In

addition, the creators of the video
hope it will be used in other Univer-
sity classes.
There has also been some interest
among faculty at Central and Eastern
Michigan Universities for use of the
video, although there have been no
official requests, said University Me-
dia Program Manager George
Williams.
Williams administered a grant for
the project from the Center for Re-
search on Learning and Teaching.
The idea for the video evolved
when several Nursing School stu-
dents were outraged by a film in
their family planning class which
they said unfairly represented Black
women.
The students wanted to produce a
video that would better examine cul-
tural friction by having students talk
about what they feel.

Music School junior Sirad BO
ducci, the video's producer, director,
and editor, said this format should be
more effective than presenting only
factual material on discrimination.
"The whole point of the video is
to let people teach each other about
their backgrounds, their religions,
their races, and how they feel," she
said. "This is not the stereotypical
instruction audiovisual material thA
we are supposed to learn from. Wh
this video does is says: 'Don't listen
to the media influence and just listen
to each other, talk to each other."'
I The students interviewed in the
video talk about their backgrounds,
experiences they have had with prej-
udice, and their dreams for a world
without it. In addition to racial and
sexual discrimination, students dis-
cuss discrimination among people
differing educations and geographi
origins.

LIGHTS
Continued from page 1
the University has installed lighting
outside of some campus buildings
and in parking structures and lots,
and plans to light additional areas.
"If there are still places on cam-
pus where the lighting is insuffi-
cient, we want to know about it, and
we'll try to take the appropriate
measures," Almashy added.

However, LSA junior Joyce
Gresko, vice chair of the Michigan
Student Assembly's Women's Issues
Commission, remains unconvinced.
"Regardless of whether the lights
get fixed or not, they'll break down
again," she said. "The University
says they want to hear our views;
but once we give them an answer,
they don't listen. We've gotten cops
instead of lights."
Gresko referred to the Univer-

sity Board of Regents' June decision
to establish a campus police force. A
majority of students instead sup-
ported increasing lighting and im-
plementing more programs such as
Safewalk.
First-year LSA student Pam
Schneider said, "The Diag is sup-
posed to be the center of activity on
campus, and I don't even feel safe
walking through it at night."

Upress club presents
awards to Mic.medi,.a

LEE are needed for the events scheduled "It might be worked out for
C np 1on campus for the holiday. The Spike Lee to come," said committee
Continued from page 1 committee came up with a list of co-chair Bunyan Bryant.
an interest in bringing Lee to Ann about ten names of possible speak- Last year Lee spoke at Michigan
Arbor. Opening and closing speakers ers, which included Lee. State University.

Calvin and Hobbes

LOOK MotA, AE W'GTJ
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by Bill Watterson
I1 WKY IWPIJR I READO E'
TRAN OF YEAR THESE
A. R'C)NA{. "ERE I I MADt
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by Brenda Dickinson
Journalists from around the state
gathered in Ann Arbor Friday to re-
ceive Excellence in Journalism
Awards given by the University
Press Club of Michigan, a group of
Michigan journalists.
For the fourth year in a row, The
Detroit News was named the best
daily newspaper in the state with a
circulation of more than 50,000.
The Ann Arbor News won its
second consecutive award for the best
daily with circulations of 15 to 50
thousand. WKBD-TV 50 in South-
field was named the number one
news program broadcasted in the De-
troit metropolitan area.
Entrants were judged by out of
state news professionals for excel-
lence in graphics, content, photo and
production quality, and the opinion
section in two of their editions or
broadcasts.

Guest speaker Deni Elliott, direc-
tor of the Institute for the Study of
Applied and Professional Ethics at
Dartmouth College, kicked off the
award ceremony with a discussion of
the book she is currently writing,
"Sources and Sorcery."
"Journalists play a unique and vi-
tal role and therefore deserve special
rights and privileges," Elliott told 87
journalists, students and educators at
the conference. "Journalists do a lot
more than pandering to public de-
sire."
Earlier in the day, panel discus-
sions were held.
On a panel which considered the
treatment of victims of crime and
tragedy in the news, Ray Wilck, as-
sistant news director at WKBD-TV
50 said his a decision made one year
ago to air a tape of the DeLisle fam-
ily tragedy was split-second.
The DeLisle car, with six family

members in it, plunged into the DO
troit River at Wyandotte, killing all
four children.
After playing the tape of rescuers
moving the limp body of one of the
children,Wilck said, "If we had
known the children were dead we def-
initely would not have aired the
tape.
On another panel, Judy Diebolt,.
assistant city editor of the Detro0
News and a Michigan Daily alum-
nus, said "zoning" is a new trend in
big city papers. The Detroit News
divided the metropolitan area into
five zones and the paper dedicates
one day per week to covering com-
munity and family issues in each
zone.
Another panel discussed the Free-
dom of Information Act and Open
Meetings Act, which gives the pub@
lic the right to obtain public docu-
ments useful in investigative report-
ing.

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by Judd Winick
-MIS?'KID .WIT4 LIK(-A
P't-1 ON ACtD.
:F 'I S C~oD
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ANYW4AY? I.L C-Tft C

Recruiters to visit 'U' campus
as part of Career Expo 1990

by Ken Walker
Daily Staff Writer
Nearly 60 organizations will be
on campus to interview to discuss
job opportunities with students this
week as part of Career Expo '90, an
event organized by the University's
Career Planning and Placement
(CP&P) office.
Career Expo '90 is the first con-
ference of its type, said Terri
LaMarco, a coordinator of recruit-
ment programs at CP&P.

LaMarco said Career Expo is the
"most diverse combination of em-
ployers" of any University-sponsored
employment conference including
the Summer Job Fair and the Minor-
ity Career Conference.
The job fair will allow students
to speak to, and leave resumes with,
recruiters from roughly 60 organiza-
tions.
The list of attending organiza-
tions includes: IBM, Etna Life &
Casualty Insurance Company, the
County of Muskegon, and the Fed-
eral Reserve Bank of Chicago.
LaMarco expects an enthusiastic
response from students wishing to
attend the event. Close to 1,000 stu-
dents have pre-registered to attend,
but she expects close to 3,000 stu-
dents will participate in the confer-
ence.
LaMarco believes Career Expo
will become an annual University
event. "We believe it's a great op-
portunity for the students, and we're

having a lot.of fun organizing (the
conference)," she said. "The employ-
ees have warmed to the idea, so it
looks like we'll keep going with it."
Terry Peterson, a national college
recruiting representative for IBM, is
one of the recruiters who will be at-
tending the event.
"We feel like...we are in partner*
ship with the University," said Pe-
terson. "We go to career fairs like
this... to share career information"
with students.
Career Expo '90 officially begins
at 5 p.m. at the Michigan Union
Pendleton Room with a speech by
Jan Brunvand, a nationally syndi-
cated columnist and scholar of urban
legends.
LaMarco said students interested
in Career Expo '90 should visit the
CP&P offices in the Student Activi-
ties Building before the conference
begins.

..

Health Care Clinic of Ann Arbor
3012 Packard Road " 971-1970

The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter
terms by students at the University of Michigan. Subscription rates: for fall and winter (2 semesters)
$28.00 U.S. mail and $28 on campus, for fall only $22.00 U.S. mail.
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ADDRESS: The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
PHONE NUMBERS: News (313) 764-0552, Opinion 747-2814, Arts 763-0379, Sports 747-3336, Cir-
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h

c a r e e r p
0199

0

4 4 0
EXPLORING EMPLOYMENT S
Open House
Thursday, October 25,
Michigan Union, Wolverin
1:10 - 2:20 p.m.
Representatives from a variety of organiz
their fields, qualities/qualifications sought
career paths.
Opportunities for minorities areh

ECTORS
1990
e A-C
zations discuss
and potential
highlighted

EDITORAL STAFF;
Editor in Chif
Mnaing Editor
News Editor,
Opinion Editor
Associate Editors
weekend Editors
Photo Editor

Noah Rrkl
Krisline LaLonde
Diane CookIan Hotman
Josh Mtick, Noele Vance
David Schwartz
Stephen Henderson,
L Matthew Miler
Ronan Lynch
Kevin Woodson
Jose .Juarez

Sports Editor
Associate Editors
Arts Editors
Books
Rim
Music
Theater

Mike GO
Andy Gottesman,
Qvld Hyman, Eric Lemont,
Ryan Schreiber, Jeff Sheran
Krisin Paln, Annette Petrusso
Cardyn Pagor
Jen Ik, Brent Edwards
Pete Shapiro
May Beth Barber

News: Josephine Ballenger, Michele Clayton, Jinho Chung, Heather Fee, Julie Foster, Henry Gdldbatt,Jenniler Hid, Christine
Kloostra, Amanda Neuman, Shaii Patel, Meissa Peerless, Dan Poux, Matt Pulliam, David Rheingdd, Gil Renberg, Behany
Robertson, Sarah Schweitzer, Annabel Vered, Stefanie Vines, Ken Walker, Donna WoodwelL
Opinion: TornAbowd, RusselBaltimore, Mark Buchan, Mike Fischer,Lesie Heibrunn,Andrew Levy, Jennifer Mattson, Chris
Nordstom, Dawn Paurinski, GlynnWashington, Kevin Woodson.
Sports: Ken Artz, Jason Bank, Andy Brown, Mke Bess, Walt Butzu, Jeff Cameron, Steve Cohen, Theodore Cox, Andy DeKorte, Matt
Dodge, Josh Dubow, Jeni Durst, Scott Erskine, Phil Green, R.C. Heaton, David Kraft, Jeff Leberman, Rich Levy, Albert Un, Rod
Loewenttal, Adam Mier, John Niyo, Sarah Osbun, Matt Rennie, David Schechter, Ken Sigura, Eric Sklar, Andy Stabile, Dan Zodh.
Arts: Mark 8neil, Greg Baise, Jene Dahlknann,Michael Pad FischerForrest Green I, MkeKuniavsky, Elzabeth Lenhard, David
Lubliner, Mike Molior, Ronald Soott, Sue Usdmam, Kim Yaged, Nabeel Zuberi,
Photo: Anthony M. Crdl, Jennifer Dunetz, Amy Feldman, Krissy Goodman, Kennelh Smoer,
Weekend: Phil Cohen, Miguel Cruz, Donna ladipaco, Jesse Walker, Fred Zinc.

1:10 1:30p. m.
Sales/Marketing - Ford Motor Company

6

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