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October 15, 1990 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1990-10-15

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily- Monday, October 15, 1980

Calvin and Hobbe
ON, GREAT ALTAR
OF PASE
ENTERTA1NMENT'

by Bill Watterson HUNGER

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Continued from page 1
"If you are in the position to help
out, you have the responsibility,"
said Diamond Head Cafe Owner Lisa
Moore. "We want to raise people's
consciencesness. Its nice to give on
Christmas and Thanksgiving, but
what about the other 363 days of the
year?" she said.
"We like to give back to the
community," General Manager of
Bicycle Jim's Restaurant and Pub
Steve Chronis said. "We feel that if
people see we are helping, they will

patronize our restaurant. It's a really
good fundraiser - because there is
little else done for the hungry by the
government, it's important for citi-
zens to get involved," Chronis said.
Other restaurants participating
this year are: Afternoon Delight,
Amadeus Cafe, Argiero's Italian
Restaurant, Aubree's Saloon, Bella"
Ciao Trattoria, Casey's Tavern,
Chick Inn Drive Inn, Cousin's Her-
itage Inn, Cub's AC, Del Rio Bar,
Dunkin Donuts, The Earle, Es-
coffier, Expresso Royale, Expresso

Royale Cafe, Fleetwood Diner, Food
For All Seasons, The Gandy Dancer,
Haab's Restaurant, Herc's Beef and
Spirits, Jacques Patisserie, Kerry-
town Bistro, The Lord Fox, Miller's
Ice Cream Parlor, Moveable Feast,
Pizza Bob's, Raja Rani, Seva
Restaurant, Siam Kitchens, Stuc-
chi's Ice Cream, Subway, Weber's,
and Zingerman's Deli.

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Calvin and Hobbes

by Bill Watterson
A LTCO HOL

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Continued from page 1
Driving) offered to help," Higgs
said, "but I don't think they've done
anything (except) contribute pam-
phlets."
Commers hopes to expand the
program next year, "to provide a
comprehensive week for the whole
campus."
Higgs is also displeased with the

University's contribution to the
events. "The University hasn't been
helpful at all," she said. "They (the
University) are anti-Greek," she
added.
University Health Service
Counselor Teresa Herzog, who orga-
nized Alcohol Awareness Week
meetings in April, left her position
and no one was hired to fill her ab-
sence.
One activity was cancelled be-
cause of University liability fears,

Higgs said.
The event was to involve the*
voluntary intoxication of six IFC
and Panhellenic members of legal
drinking age. The drunk participants
would then be brought to the Diag
for a police alcohol test to show the
effects of alcohol abuse.
Commers hopes to include the
event next year. Higgs said the event
is important because "people know
how alcohol affects them but the)4
may not know by how much."

Michigan Alumni work here:
The Wael treei Jourai.
Tihe Nework Tm . ecausthey workedhere:
The Washington Post 'hS
TheDetroitFreePress Urje l||dlt§ZU1 %t{
The DetroitNews
NBC Sports

CHALK-IN
Continued from page 1
said the chalk-in was "a way to
wake up students who aren't aware
of what's going on because it's
highly visible."
"Once we get enough students
active against it, as they voted
against it, then the Regents might
actually listen and represent the
people they're supposed to be,
which are the students," RC first-
year student and SRC member
Christine Van Valey added.
Some passing through the Diag
stopped to read the chalk slogans,

while others ignored them.
"I'm against campus police to
carry guns. I think it's a disaster in
that they probably won't be prop-
erly trained or experienced. I re-
member 'bad blood' between police
and student groups," said Marty
Huff, a Syracuse University alum-
nus who was in town visiting his
daughter.
Department of Public Safety of-
ficials have said the University
force will be specially trained to
deal with a campus environment.
"I get the impression by looking

around that everyone thinks this is
the Kent State years," said Colin
Gipson, a University Hospital Se-
curity employee. "I don't specifi-
cally agree with it, either... but the
guns are not the main reason they
did this."
"The guns are what have gotten
the most publicity... (but) we were
paying $500,000 for services (from
Anti Arbor police) and not getting
it," Gipson stated.
"I don't believe guns are an an-
swer, but it's part of deputization."

CENTENNIAL ISSUE
COMING FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19th
celebrate the first hundred years

CODE
Continued from page 1
After several futile efforts to draw
up a Code, the Council, plagued by
internal arguing, terminated its
weekly meetings, and ceased com-
munication in 1987.
In June of 1987, the Regents,
seeing the paralysis of the body
while still pushing for a Code of
Non-Academic Conduct, gave the
Council a one-year deadline to pro-
duce workable implementation
guidelines for the University's new
policy on student protests, or be
permanently terminated at the end of
that year.
The Council began meeting
again, and was able to convince the
Regents that, while they needed
more time, they were progressing
towards a concrete policy. At the end
of April, 1989, they were granted a
sixth-month extension.
Last December, the Council pre-
sented its policy regarding student
protest and free speech to the Re-
gents.
Although the Regents accepted
their recommendations, it promptly
disbanded the Council.
"It (the U-Council) had ceased to
be an effective organization, and had
little support from the students on

this campus," Regent Deane Baker
(R-Ann Arbor) said.
He explained that the student rep-
resentatives on the Council repre-
sented a small group of students
with a particular ideology and the
Council was no longer meeting its
responsibilities.
However, University Director of
Academic Services Harry Mclaughlin
disagreed with the Regents.
Mclaughlin was an administrative
representative on the Council for
three and a half years, until last De-
cember when the Council was dis-
banded
"I think that we (the members of
U-Council) would have been able to
accomplish our goal, but the Re-
gents figured, 'twenty years is long
enough'," he said.
Social Work Professor Tom
Croxton agreed with Mclaughlin.
Croxton, a faculty representative on
the Council for its last year, said the
councilmembers had made signifi-
cant changes, and were finally get-
ting some serious work done.
"We made several procedural
changes, and we were given several
specific tasks by the administration,"
Croxton said. "The important thing
is, we were on the road to fulfilling
them."
Martin Gold, chair of the Univer-
sity's Civil Liberties Board (CLB)
-an advisory group comprised of
faculty, student, and administrative
representatives which examines po-
tential University policy and makes
recommendations on civil rights
ramifications - said the University
administration has disregarded much
of the CLB's advice on the Code is-
sue and the importance of the Coun-
cil in the past, but the administra-
tion has not consulted with them re-
cently.
The CLB assisted the administra-
tion in the formulation of the dis-

criminatory harassment policy ands
was responsible for much of thew
University's Free Speech and Protest
Policy.
The CLB was a vocal defender of
the University Council, and the need
for students to have some say in
formulating campus policies.
In a statement from June of
1984, the CLB stated that "Regents;
Bylaw 7.02 (that created the U-
Council) expresses an important
civil liberties principle, namely that
a community should be governed by
rules to which its members have as-
sented, either directly or through
their popularly elected representa-
tives."
He went on to stress the impor-
tance University Council played in
student-administration relations and
the impact of its termination. -
"The demise of U-Council meant@
that students and faculty lost their
veto over any university regulations
limiting behavior on campus," he
said.
Regent Baker disagreed with
Gold, and said he saw little impact
from the Council's demise. a
"It was not an effective organiza-
tion, and it had never been an effec-
tive organization, so I don't see how
its demise has or will affect relations*
between the students and the admin-
istration here at the University," he
said.
However, some do not dismiss
the importance of the Council's
demise so easily.
"The U-Council was very sym-
bolic; it was a place where students,
faculty and staff could have dialogue
and exchange ideas on University
policies," Croxton explained.
"There's simply no other mecha-
nism to do the job of U-Council and
I think many people on this campus
are going to miss it, however sym-
bolic its value was."

Kidder, Peabody & Co.
Incorporated

Cordially Invites
University of Michigan Seniors
to attend a presentation on
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
IN IN VESTMENT BANKING
AT KIDDER, PEABODY
Wednesday, October 17,1990
7:00 P.M.
Kuenzel Room - Michigan Union
Reception to follow presentation

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