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October 10, 1990 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1990-10-10

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, October 10, 1990

Business School students help Poland change to

by Matt Adler
Many first-year MBA students in
the University's School of Business
choose to work for Fortune 500 cor-
porations in summer internship po-
sitions.
Nine MBA candidates chose an-
other route when they were given the
unique opportunity to embark on an
historic mission to Poland this past
summer, as part of the newly-formed
Michigan Business Assistance
Corps. The corps' goal was to assist
government agencies, as well as a
variety of state-run and private in-
dustries in the country's conversion
to a capitalist economy.

The inspiration for the program
came from Edwin Miller, Associate
Dean of the School of Business. The
events taking place in Eastern Eu-
rope last winter caused Miller to ask
himself what role the University,
and specifically the Business School
could have in assisting former
Communist nations.
He came up with the idea to send
students as "a model coming off the
Peace Corps."
Miller gave much credit for the
execution of his ideas to Marian
Kryzowski, Director of the Business
School's Great Lakes Trade Adjust-
ment Assistance Center.

Kryzowski is the editor of a variety of corporations.
Studium Papers, a journal of politics
and economics. His position as edi- Second-year MBA student Eric
tor has put Kryzowlski in contact Mikesell spent the summer with the
'The students believe they're going to be part
of history, even if they're just a grain of
sand on the beach.'
-Edwin Miller, Associate Dean
of the School of Business

for privatization, Poland's govern-
ment will sell four to six by the end
of this year.
James McKeon, also a second-
year MBA student, was employed by
Doradca, a business consulting firm
in Sopot.
McKeon said his experience was
"truly a win-win situation. I came
out for the better and the firm came
out for the better."
Miller said that the program was
"successful beyond our wildest
hopes...it was met with enthusiasm
and appreciation by the Poles."
"The students believe they're go-
ing to be part of history, even if

with members of Poland's Solidarity
trade union, and it was through these
connections that the students were
placed in jobs with Poland's Min-
istries of Finance, Privatization, and

Ministry of Privatization. His major
responsibilities involved evaluating
state-run industries for their potential
as private corporations. Of 20 indus-
tries which Mikesell recommended

BUSH
Continued from page 1
long sought.
4 "That's on the table. That's been
talked about. And if it's proper, if it
can be worked in proper balance be-
tween the capital gains rate and in-
come tax changes, fine, " Bush said.
Senate Majority Leader George
Mitchell, D-Maine, immediately
hailed Bush's seeming turnabout.
"I have personally advocated (an
increased tax rate) on those making
more than $200,000 a year for some

time. And I'm pleased that the pres-
ident has now come around, or ap-
parently come around, to our point
of view and to recognize the fairness
of such a change," Mitchell said.
Bush promised to do "everything
in my power" to make sure
Congress comes up with a five-year
deficit reduction package that
matches the $500 billion goal of an
earlier package supported by the the
president and congressional leaders
but rejected in the House.
Bush also apologized to "the
valiant federal work force" and others
inconvenienced by a three-day gov-

ernment shutdown and continuing
budget uncertainty.
After vetoing an earlier stopgap
spending bill on Saturday, Bush
gave his early morning signature to
a new temporary spending bill that
keeps the government operating un-
til Oct. 19 while Congress tries to
come up with the budget accord.
The president's signature, just
hours before the bulk of the gov-
ernment's 2.4 million work force
was to return from a three-day holi-
day weekend, averted a widespread
disruption in government services.

PROVOST
Continued from page 1

ulty and staff maintain a high level
of quality," he said.
Whitaker may be new to the job
of provost, but he certainly is no
stranger to the University and its
,orkings.
Whitaker has been working here
since 1979 as the Business School
Dean. "I miss the business school at

times," he said. "Over there I was a
little closer to faculty and students.
As provost I see the University as a
whole," Whitaker said.
As provost Whitaker will have a
different relationship with University
President James Duderstadt. The two
men worked together when they were
both deans but now he has a chance
to work with him more directly.
Whitaker finds working with
Duderstadt "both challenging and ex-

:apitalism
they're just a grain of sand on the
beach," he said.
Program administrators are coin
sidering expanding The Michigah@
Business Corps next summer to in-
clude the Soviet Union, Hungary and
Czechoslovakia.
Miller said the program may id-
clude undergraduate business major,
as well as students from other
schools in the University.
A symposium entitled "Once in a
lifetime" will take place on Friday at
3 p.m. in Hale Auditorium. Partict-
pants in the Michigan Business A&A
sistance Corps will discuss the pro-
gram with all who wish to attend.
citing. After all, we've been col-
leagues a long time-the only thing
different with my new position is
that I see a lot more of him lately,"
he said.
The position of provost is tradi-
tionally a stepping-stone to the Uni@
versity's presidency, but Whitak ,r
does not see himself going in that
direction. "I have no plans to pursue
the presidency," he said. "I do expect
to be provost for quite a long time
any little infraction (on our part)
would subject us to immediate re-
moval," the man said. "She said
even if you were to make a long
distance phone call and didn't im-
mediately come upstairs (to let her*
know), you would be subject to
dismissal."
At last night's meeting of the
Board, McGlothlin urged the Board
members to sanction a former Daily
editor who did not properly record
long-distance business phone calls
from the Daily. Though the former
editor, LSA senior Miguel Cruz, has
been mentioned by name at meetings
of the Board, the Board refused t
discuss any specific allegations
against McGlothlin.
Prof. Amnon Rosenthal, who
chairs the Board, refused to listen to
the grievances about McGlothlin,
and ended the meeting when editors
mentioned her name and tried to
bring up their concerns.
"It's entirely hypocritical that the*
Board would discuss allegations
against me in a public setting, yet
they go through the trouble of con-
sulting the University's attorney to
come up with a rule allowing them
to bar public discussion of Nancy,"
Cruz said.

DIVERSITY
Continued from page 1
quirement, President Jennifer Van
Valey expressed her reservations
about the proposal which was
passed-

"I will always be in favor of a di-
versity requirement," Van Valey
said. "People have to be forced to
deal with racism."
The broad list of classes, how-
ever, will not force students to look
at the way racism is constructed in
their minds, she said.

Although .the Curriculum Com-
mittee has not yet compiled a list of
classes that will satisfy the require-
ment, courses can count towards a
student's distribution or concentra-
tion requirements.
UCAR members were unavail-
able for comment.

Calvin and Hobbes

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McGLOTHLIN
Continued from page 1
this for a charitable organization,"
said the employee, who was familiar
with the project. "She didn't ask
anybody. She said to do it when they
weren't working on Daily stories."
Last night, McGlothlin denied
any "personal use" of Daily facilities
or Board resources. "I don't remem-
ber any of that," she said.
Rule number 201.65-1 of the
Standard Practice Guide states: "The
use of official position and influence
to further personal gain or that of
families or associates is considered
to be unacceptable behavior and in
direct opposition to University pol-
icy."
The University's top attorney,
General Counsel Elsa Cole, said a
violation of this policy could resulti
in the dismissal of a University em-
ployee. Cole did not comment onE
this situation in particular.1
Several University officials sug-
gested to the editors of the Daily that
they present their concerns to the
Board for Student Publications. The
only other mechanism by which
McGlothlin can be investigated, they
said, is through the University's Of-
fice of Audits.

The editors said they plan to file
a grievance with the audit office this
morning. "This is the only channel
to go through if the Board refueses
to listen to us," said Daily
Managing Editor Kristine LaLonde.
McGlothlin's help in producing
the cookbook - which was com-
piled by Betsy Bushong of the
Washtenaw County Women's Crisis
Center - was confirmed in a letter
from Bushong to McGlothlin,
thanking McGlothlin and others at
the Daily for typesetting the book.
The letter, dated Oct. 14, 1983,
noted that the Daily's "typesetting
certainly makes all the difference" in
putting out the cookbook.
One of the five or six production
staff involved with the project said
that when he saw the letter, he kept
it and began gathering more infor-
mation about McGlothlin's actions.
In addition to the cookbook, the
employee said McGlothlin has forced
the production staff to use their time
and Daily facilities to set the type
for her children's resum6s. The man
said he thought such activity "was
an incredibly stupid thing" for
McGlothlin to have done, because
she repeatedly "was preaching about
University rules."
"She made it very clear to us that

Nuts and Bolts
HEY You! YES OFFCERS?
W E BEE GETTrNC A
S~RIES OF COMPLAINTS ABOUT
YOU SCARING CMUPREN.

=THE:L 1AVE BEN?
~CONO ic A~t ICATONS
THAT H~ ~OLDS PR SENr
SITA~iNS 10() FR US

v -N

by Judd Winick
CAN W'E BUST HIM FO2R
-- HAT?
LOOK Z poN'I NAve ANY
DOUGHNUTS S~O ~JUSTC0
TIrrCgT A FERAS HOUSE OR~
SoNE+-.4gN' W~l--YA'.

BOARD
Continued from page 1
"crucial to deal with the editor and
not a variety of others."
In a 6-2 vote, the Board decided to
turn the meeting into a closed execu-
tive session "to hear Noah on pro-
duction deadlines and other issues he
might like to raise" but reserved the
right to "call any witnesses."
In the remaining hour of the
meeting, the Board and Finkel
reached what Finkel called a "partial
step" toward resolving the conflict
between Daily staffers and McGloth-

Board, the Daily business manager
and McGlothlin.
Furthermore, Finkel said there
would be a yearly evaluation of the
general manager's performance.
Finkel said the compromise is
"not something that will solve what
the editors see as the problem."
McGlothlin was enthusiastic
about the approved proposal and said
that the more explicit description of
her job will make "everyone clear,
and then I can do my job better in
the future."
Rosenthal refused to comment on
the Board's actions taken during the
executive session, but he said, "I'd
like to see the Board work harmo-
niously with the Daily as it has in
the past and can in the future... I un-
derstand the concerns of the edit staff
but I disagree with their means to ai
their grievances, especially about ao
individual."

I

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McGlothlin

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INTRAMURAL SPORTS PROGRAM
FALL ICE HOCKEY LEAGUES
REGISTRATION OF TEAMS: WED., OCTOBER 10, 1990
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INTRAMURAL SPORTS BUILDING
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-w

I

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Find it in the Daily.
bel r+ijuu DaiIC
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lin.
The closed meeting ended with an
agreement to create "a new and de-
tailed definition of the general man-
ager's position," Finkel said. The
definition would be decided by the
editor in chief, a representative of the

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