100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 11, 1990 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1990-09-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, September 11, 1990 - Page 7

,- AW

s. .i.

Jail marks Gays with
colored wristbands

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) -
Fort Worth jail has promised to
reconsider its system of marking
homosexual inmates with colored
wristbands.
All prisoners at Tarrant County
Jail wear colored wristbands: red for
(elons, blue for misdemeanor offend-
ers, orange for those awaiting trans-
fer to federal prisons, yellow for
prisoners with medical problems,
snd grayfor homosexuals.
New inmates are questioned as
they enter the jail, which houses
* both men and women. Those who
say they are homosexual or bisexual
are allowed protective custody be-
cause homosexuals are common tar-
gets of abuse by other inmates, jail
officials said Saturday.
Homosexual inmates who
*choose protective custody are given
gray wristbands and housed in iso-
ated groups, although they mingle

with the rest of the prisoners during
meals and exercise breaks, officials
said.
We need to make sure one pris-
oner is not abusing another prisoner
for any reason, and this is an aid to
us," said John Pempsell, the chief
deputy sheriff who oversees the jail.
MIiany hotnosx Ia 3(!tivists and
civi libcrtu ians d the wristbands
invite abuse, rather than deter it.
"You're putting a sign around
their neck like, 'Come and Beat on
Me,"' said Ed Koren, a Washington
attorney for the National Prison Pro-
ject of the American Civil Liberties
Union.
Jail administrator Bill Broome
met Thursday with two members of
the gay alliance and said the policy,
which has been in effect for years,
would be reconsidered.
"No policy is set in concrete,"
Broome said, "But the question has
never before been brought to my at-
tention."

CLASSIFIED ADS

ANTHONY M. cROLUDaly

GOING PLACES

ANNOUNCEMENTS

International radio
Business School Professor Warshaw (left) and Professor Kulhmeijer of the Arasmus University in the
Netherlands enjoy their afternoon on the Law Quad while listening to a BBC radio broadcast featuring the
University.
Student Book Exchange turns over
new page, oves to W.est Quad.

UN calls
for peace
plan in
Camnbodia
JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) -
Cambodia's Vietnamese-backed gov-
ernment and leaders of rebel factions
agreed yesterday to a U.N. peace plan
that calls for power-sharing and free
elections.
Cambodia Premier Hun Sen said
a date for a cease-fire had not been
worked out, but all sides appeared
optimistic following two days of
talks to end the 11-year-old civil
war.
"We have not reached peace yet...
but we have the framework," said
Son Sann, former Cambodian pre-
mier and leader of the Khmer Peb-
ple's National Liberation Front, part
of the three-party guerrilla force.
Efforts to reach a peace accord
since July 1988 had failed when the
factions disagreed about power-shar-
ing issues. Under the approved U.N.
plan, each of the four factions would
be represented in a governing coun-
cil.
A joint statement said Hun Sen's
government would get six seats on
the so-called Supreme National
Council. Six others seats would be
shared by the resistance coalition.-A
thirteenth seat is reserved for Prince
Norodom Sihanouk, leader of the
rebel coalition.
The council is expected to make
its first formal appearance September
18 at the U.N. General Assembly
seat now held by the rebel coalition.
The council would cede mu of
its authority to the United Nation,
which would administer the coun'itr
until free elections. U.N. officials
have said up to 10,000 troops and
10,000 civilian personnel coud be
sent to Cambodia to administer the
peace plan and oversee elections, ,
The plan, which also callstfr
disarming the four armies, was
adopted last month by the five per-
manent members of the U.N. Secsu-
rity Council: the United States, So-
viet Union, China, Britain and
France.
"We are very pleased with the
document... and we accept it with-
out reservation," said Khieu Sam-
phan, head of the Communist
Khmer Rouge, which rejected the
plan in June because each faction did
not have an equal number of seats on
the council.
The five Security Council na-
tions said they "would welcome" Si-
hanouk as head of the council, but
the factions will be able to decide its
makeup and the arrangements to
transfer power to the U.N.

-S TEAM B ' 42-T
JANUARY 2.12 * 5,6 OR 7 NIGHTS
B RE C KE N
ANUARY 2.9 * 5,6 OR 7 NIGHTS
VAII/BEAVER
JANUARY 2.12.5,6 OR 7 NIGHTS '
9th ANNUAL 7
COLLEGIATE
WINTER SKI p
BREAKS
TOLL FREE INFORMATION & RESERVATIONS
1-800-321-5911
MUSIC
MUSICIANS WANTED: Female vocalist
for harmony singing. Also fiddle player.
$1ues, country, R&R. Tommy, 930-6349.
PIANO LESSONS University-experienced
teacher.Beg.-Adv. level. 930-6804.
TICKETS
MICHIGAN ALUM. needs ND tickets. Call
Jeff collect (215) 481-3673.
WANTED: 4 Season football tickets. Section
23-25. 353-3473, 353-5429.
DETROIT METRO- Newark round trip. 9/
13 - 9/17. $178. Lisa 994-4937.
MBSOLUTE TOP DOLLAR paid for U of
IM football tickets. 668-7707.
:FOOTBALL SEASON TIX, student
section, great seats-Best offer--Bev 994-
:5298.
M FOOTBALL SEASON TIX
$175 CALL 995-5034.
FOOTBALL SEASON tickets needed any
sec., must have adjoining seats.' Sam 1-800-
.777-733260am-6pm, 1-788-1386 after 6.
1 DESPERATELY NEED ND tickets.
Please call Sue 668-6569.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
-'FAST
FUN.RAISING
PROGRAM
4$10011 In just one week.
Earn up to $1000 for your campus
organization. Plus a chance at $5000 more!
This program works! No investment needed.
Call 1-800-932-0528 Ext. 50.
Seniors
Participate in a-discussion group on
*career opportunities & get paid. If
you are A finance, accounting,
.computer science, actuarial science
or liberal arts major with a 3.0
G.P.A. or better, we'd like to invite
you to participate. Sessions to be
held September' 17th on campus.
CALL TOLL FREE
1-800-783-4767.

by Gil' Renberg
Daily Staff Reporter
The Student Book Exchange
(SBE), which for two years has en-
abled students to sell and buy used
school books at prices better than
those found at local stores, appears
to have established itself among stu-
dents.
S BE's purpose is to provide bar-
gains for students buying and selling'
books.
"We're here to help the stu-
dents... to make sure they get the
most for their books," said Nikki
Smejkal, an LSA junior who is on
the SBE Board of Directors.
Students who sell books through
SBE set their own prices, which are
usually cheaper than the prices at lo-
cal merchant's establishments.
SBE's current sale, which will
end today at five o'clock, has been
declared a success by the students
who run it.
"It's been going very well," said
Erik Kafarski, an LSA senior who
serves on the SBE Board of Direc-
tors. Kafarski said he had feared an
unusually low turnout because po-

tential customers may have been
unaware of SBE's move from the
basement of the Michigan League to
the Wedge Room at West Quad.
The new location is more spa-
cious than the League basement,
which tended to become crowded. "A
lot of people got discouraged because
it was so packed," Smejkal said.
The gain in working space is just
one of the improvements, Smejkal
said. Problems that occurred in the
past are now expected and dealt with
before they develop. For instance,
SBE is now keeping track of every
book by computer in order to handle
numerous sales more efficiently.
In addition to the Board of Direc-
tors, whose members organize the
sale months ahead of time, SBE de-
pends on a large number of student
volunteers. This term, approxi-
mately 50 students are working
shifts. Many of these volunteers are
members of Alpha Phi Omega, a
campus service fraternity.
SBE is a non-profit organization
and neither its directors nor its vol-
unteers receive anything more than'

free refreshments and a tee-shirt.
SBE retains 15 percent of the
gross income from the book sales.
Of this, some money is used to pay
sales taxes and cover expenses. The
remaining money is donated to char-
ity. Although the directors have yet
to chose a charity, they say that they
will lean towards charities whose
members worked for SBE as volun-
teers.
Vinit Doshi, an LSA junior, ex-
pects SBE to continue its success.
"This is only its third year, but each
year it has become better and better."

STAND UP. COMEDY
EVERY WEDNESDAY
In The U-Club
10:00 P.M.

ROOMMATES
2 FEMALE ROOMMATES needed to
share a GREAT apartment on Packard
nearlill. $275/mo. 930-0406.
FIRST MONTH RENT iS FREE! A male
needed to fill 2 bdrm., 4 person apt. on 912 S.
Forest. Call 930-6196 for detailst
GRAD STUDENT needed to share large
private apt. near N. Camp & hosp., fum.,
chem. free. $357 + util. Robin 668-6313.
HELP We need 2 roommates- 1 to share a
double and 1 for a single. Very close to
MLB. Call 998-1958.
ROOMMATE 3 COOL GUYS looking for
fourth. Great location. Cheap rent. Sweet apt.
Call 998-0567.
ROOMMATE(S) WANTED. Share w/ 3
males in Geddes Hill apt., appr. $250/mo.,
Contact Rick, Scott, Bobby at 998-0470.
COMPUTERS
ABSOLUTELY THE LOWEST PRICES
6n campus. IBM Compatible Computers. Or-
der today, pick-up tomorrow. Call now 747-
9400.
COMPUTER SALES & technical.
Downtown Ann Arbor. Call 747-9400.
Surma sInvent=r Sale-30-60% off
XT-10 AftZ system.......$789
586- 12MRS.systern....... $899
386es-16MEs system....$1199
systems include: 1 Meg, 20 Hard
Drive, mono monitor, 1.2 Floppy,
101 kybrd.
Mao & IBM Peripherals
VGA monitors/Hard Drives $249
emory Modules lowest prices-CALL
1 Year Limited Warranty
MO0 Computer 583-1895

Mt/ian Memories last a
lifetime in a
Mic anEnsian.
Buy a copy of the
1991 yearbook today!

m

AW

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan