100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 06, 1990 - Image 77

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1990-09-06
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

"0

C

.

Page 14-The Michigan Daily/New Student Edition - Thursday, September 6, 1990

The Michigan Daily/New Student Edition- Thursda,
N U El
~J nfl I 1111 k a

ARK
Continued from page 7
you are on the ball, you don't have
to be rich, too. The Ark is ready and
eager to accept volunteers, which ba-
sically means you get your name put
on a list for the show you want to
see, show up an hour early and get
to hang out with the ex-hippies who
are regular workers there. Every

once in a while, you'll sell a t-shirt
or a cup of coke and you'll probably
get a chance to meet the friendly
types that perform at the Ark. Of
course, the best part is that you get
to see the show for free.
Another option is open-mic
night. If you can do anything that
anybody, anywhere could possibly
call music, Wednesday nights at the
Ark are for you. Storytellers and a
capella singing acts are encouraged,
and anything goes. And, if the

thought of performing makes your
stomach wither, just come down to
see the show. It's only a buck and
three pieces, and you never know
who's going to show up. The night
you decide not to come might just
be the night Blind Lemon Jefferson
decides to come back from the dead
for a one night only open-mic per-
formance at the Ark. Seriously.
Moral: Get on the ball, drag your
lazy asses down to the Ark, and get
cultured.

MUSEUMS
Continued from page 13
Library holds a collection devoted
to historical documents from early
America.
Finally, for those with a natural
affinity for the more scientifically
quantifiable, there is the Natural
Science Exhibit Museum, near C.C.
Little and the Hill. This museum

...,,...".tttt*,:a:i:.". *":: .* t ti ..'.11 ii .1: '.::. ;.;." .: .. :"::: {.;
t t*.*.. S 0. 1t.t SP "5 11 tt,., 1.t.,1.1.ti.. . {.1;.;:;:, 1".t."...v.
::1 ti:'t1~. S1.:1. .. .....,.. .1...1.1.. . ":.1": .11111*.*::::...*.i.
...+1 ..:, .. ..... ..... 11:::::" :1:"" .. ".. "" ....1....... .:.. :::;'.1 .::::': ""

88.3
9.9
91.7
92.3
94.7
195.5

97.9
98.7
99.5
100.3
101.1
101.9
102.9
105.1
105.9
FM

WCBN
Stiadminm
WIU (NR)
Jazout ofEMU
CBE
*WUOM(NPR)
C~j
WVAE
New A:efazz
wcsx
ClnkRock
Top 40
WHYT
Top4cvTop 10
wugunk
WLLZ
Album Rock
WDTX
Top 40
WNIC
WmIF
Album Rock
IWDET(NPRI)
im/Akemauve
IWIQB
An Aw ased
ClnkRock
lWQRS
NPI - NNMIIu
Public Raio Staion

FILE PHOTO
Even though Taj Mahal has been through many stylistic changes, trom
blues to Appalachia to calypso, there is not one point in his career when
he would not been right at home at the Ark.

THEATER
Continued from page 6
directed by Barry Goldman. Goldman
currently heads a traveling drama
troupe in Europe. Timothy Mason,
who wrote Landscape, came to see
the performance and spoke with
aspiring playwrights and actors.
The University's Musical The-
ater department is becoming one of
the best in the nation. Last year they
performed La Boheme and Three
Penny Opera, dazzling audiences
with such great musical and acting
talent that the shows could have
been on Broadway.
Within the Residential College is
the RC Players, which is consti-
tuted of, but is not limited to, RC
students. Often times classics are
shown after months of intense study
about the work. Previous perfor-
mances have included Marlowe's Dr.
Faustus and the Russian comic
tragedy Three Sisters. The RC
Players allow students to see great
historical pieces, not just read them
in an English class.
Joining the RC Players and per-
forming in East Quad is the Brecht
Company, which focuses on the
"epic" form of Bertolt Brecht and
other playwrights similar to him.
Some of the best theater this year
was put on by the Black Theater
Workshop, especially the perfor-
mance of The Meeting in celebra-
tion of Martin Luther King day.
Charles Jackson, head of the ,4rk-
shop, directed this powerful and
thought provoking play about the
hypothetical meeting of Martin
Luther King and Malcolm X.
Not all University performances
are directed by faculty or non-stu-
dents. The University Activities
Center (UAC) has shows that are run
wholly by students. MUSKET puts

illuminates not only the study of
culture and its products, but delves
further into geological strata with
several dinosaur skeletons on
display.
Through their association with
various departments, the Uni-''
versity's museums and galleries
allow for the interests of students, as
they develop their own academic
program.
on two musicals a year. Fall brings
the Sophshow's musical, in which
only first- and second-year students
can audition. Another UAC spon-
sored performance is the Comedy
Company, a sketch comedy troupe
that writes and performs their own
material. If you have ever had aspira-
tions to write or act for Saturday
Night Live, go to the mass meeting
or stop by a writers' meeting.
The Arena Theater in the ground
floor of the Frieze Building is home
to Basement Arts. Here students
test out their directing abilities,
newly written plays, and other mate-
rial appropriate for a small, tight
theater. Here one can see Hopwood
Award-winning plays - the same
University award that inspired Arthur
Miller - and experimental pieces in
progress from playwriting classes.
And it is always free.
If you want to get away from the
University scene, try the non-profit
community theater Performance
Network, the Ann Arbor Civic
Theater, or the Kerrytown Con-
cert House. Another speciality is
the Barrier Free Theater, consist-
ing of both handicapped and able-
bodied performers. And for musicals,
look into the Comic Opera Guild,
who specialize in European op-
erettas.
Two years ago I was walking
through the Diag as a student thrust
a flyer about a University production
at me. "It's less than a movie," he
said about the show, "and a heck of
a lot better." Theater in Ann Arbor is
par with theater in big cities, even
New York and Los Angeles. Many
people come from out of town to see
performances. James Earl Jones,
Arthur Miller, and Gilda Radner all
started here. Take advantage of Ann
Arbor's theater by seeing Broadway
talent without Broadway prices.

Ann Arbor's musical
contends for national

by Annette Petrusso
One thing new students have come
to expect when they come to college
is something of a local music scene.
After hearing the near legendary tales
of the scenes in such college towns
as Madison, Wisconsin and Athens,
Georgia, not to mention that Soul
Asylum started out of the miniscule
scene surrounding Carlton College
in Minnesota, some cross their
musical fingers after they choose
Ann Arbor. They won't be that
disappointed.
On any given night, you can
catch shows at a number of bar-like
and intimate theater venues. The
Blind Pig features a mix of the big-
ger alternative bands (Meat Puppets,
Thee Hypnotics, Mudhoney, Sound-
garden, Nirvana), blues and R and B
types (Barrence Whitfield), and some
of the more established local bands
(Mil Triffid, Juice, Anne Be Davis).
Rick's is much more drinking-ori-
ented but promotes established local

FILE PHOTO
The Laughing Hyenas take the Stoogey sounds of Ann Arbor circa 1970
and churn them through the hellish torment of the Birthday Party. If you
see them at a show, don't be afraid to say "Hi." They'll think it's funny!

bands (like Trinidad Tripoli Steel
Band), especially ones who do cov-
ers, and the occasional national act,,
usually commercially aimed (Trip
Shakespeare). Sometimes Rick's
does the unexpected-the Pixies, the
Feelies, and Happy Mondays (who
cancelled once they arrived to an
empty Rick's) all played (or almost
played) there in recent memory.
Shows at Club Heidelberg range
from obscure alternative bands to
new local bands doing their first gig.
Besides featuring reggae, new music
and hip-hop dance parties, the U-
Club in the Michigan Union has
live music a couple days out of the
week-it features weird mix of local
and national bands, like tree town-
grown Frank Allison & the Odd Sox
as well as such famous faves
fIREHOSE and Das Damen. The
Nectarine Ballroom has the oc-
casional big show; artists like Bob
Mould, Camper Van Beethoven,
Hoodoo Gurus, Soul Asylum and
Living Colour (back when they were

payir
there
Mich
show
such
Repl<
here
to da
derso
featL
ish/pc
ers C
S uza
payir
and J
M
more
sical
Laug
the D
conte
tiona
out c
open
T
thoug

Where others have failed, promoter gives musicians a decent

CINEMA,
Continued from page 8
want to see to be starting within 20
minutes. It has three different snack
counters, a parking lot the size of
Metro Airport's, and seats that
rock(!). Most importantly, none of.
the theaters are shoebox-sized like
the ones in most complexes.
Finally, if you'd rather avoid
crowds and have an intimate time
with your newfound friend, there are
several video stores within walking

distance of-campus: Study Break,~lo-
cated in the student Union; Liberty
Street Video, which has a decent for-
eign selection; and Wolverine Video,
located next-door to the ever-crowded
bar/dive Rick's (which has spawned
the popular end-of-the-night line,
"Want to come back to my place and
watch a video?").
So, given all these choices, you
have no excuse for not going to a
good film, and if you end up seeing
Rambo IV your date may offer you as
a case study of deviant behavior in
your next class.

by Annette Petrusso

IEl
* 3.
0
0

77

r~ i
' '
e ready COLUMBIA
venience, _ _ -_
BLE - - --
73-2266 "Entertainment at your Rngertips"

S ome of the best clubs in the
nation are the biggest shitholes.
(The Heidelberg) attracts people who
are seriously committed to music.
The Heidelberg is the equivalent of
the Ark for people into underground
music. It's like a concert hall..
You go there to check out the bands
and that's the way I'd like to keep
it," emphasizes Roland Diaz-Perez,
manager and booking agent for Ann
Arbor's Club Heidelberg.
Since Roland took over
management in August 1989, the
Club has become an energetic force,
giving Ann Arbor a place for newer
local bands to play their first gig,
allowing established local bands to
build a following, and bringing
some challenging national
underground acts to perform.
That space above the Heidelberg
restaurant at 215 N. Main has not
always been this successful. Before
Roland began running the club, the
infamous Martin Tury had been
running the bar, calling it the Beat,
on a less professional and less
satisfactory basis. During Tury's
final days last July, the club faltered
badly. "No one wanted to play

there-people cancelled, people who
were planning on playing,"
explained Roland.
One of the major problems had
been the sound system. When Tury
was running the club, it did not even

own a P.A., so they had to rent one
every night. Usually one was
available, but after his failure to get
one for the Opossums record release
party in that fateful July, the owners
of the Heidelberg restaurant, who

give the club the space in exchange
for their bar in the club, "were
asking around to see if anyone
wanted to take a stab at it," stated
Roland. He took over because "at the
time I just had this money ... and
since I knew that the only way it
could work would be to have a full-
time P.A. that was dedicated to the
Club and only used for that. . . . I
wanted to do it so I approached them
with something that works."
The Heidelberg had to change
many minds and overcome some
image problems. Roland explained,
"At first it was really difficult 'cause
we were working from a negative
position. Our reputation was worse
than not having any reputation-it
was a bad reputation."

Permanent Wave Special
Reg. $40 NOW ONLY $30
with this ad'-.
Highlighting Special
Reg. $35 NOW ONLY $25
wikh this ad ns
welcome .
Expires November 6, 1990 Daily 9 to 9
ANN ARBOR sat.s to s
2738 Jackson Ave. * 662-1696

Like many other local (and national) bands, Mal Triffid have often taken
advantage of the good sound and fair management at the Club Heidelberg,
where they've both headlined and supported other acts.

7i

I

J

S
drarr
diffi
thinj
fairl)
were
profe
doin
hone
ever
repu
whey
the
ever
claim
R
Gibt
persc
soun

0
.",,"
v
G ' C - "
C v
" ' ,-.

Special Rates for
Group & Birthday
Parties

'U-.
THE ARK 3s71u
- FOLK - BLUEGRASS
- JAZZ - WOMEN'S MUSIC
CHILDREN'S CONCERTS
- ACOUSTIC BLUES - ETC.
" Entertainment & Refresh
- Alcohol May Be Purchase
" DOORS OPEN 1/2 HOUR BEF
} ::CALL FOR TICKET & SCHEDULE I?
-}.=.

Welcome Back U of M Students'
Once your boxes are unpacked and you ar
for a real choice in home ENTERTAINMED
Columbia Cable will bring you choice, con
and the quality pro g that only CA
TELEVISION can oer. CALL TODAY 9

Tanning Bed Specials-Ann Arbor Store only
YPSILANTI 448 Hewitt Rd. "481-1080
Announcing Our New Location e
1076 HURON RIVER DRIVE
YPSLANTI 4841240 .i. ,. t Ovnfs

Open 7 Days All Year
Miniature Golf (best course around!)
Video Games * Pinball * Skeeball
Food & Snacks Galore From Ice
Cream To Nachos. No matter If It's
Golf or a Game, Fun Is The Name
2675 Washtenaw, Ypsilanti
(1-/2 miles east of U.S 23)
434-2838

--...

IM

r -

m

_

,%MWWI

I

o

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan