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September 06, 1990 - Image 20

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The Michigan Daily, 1990-09-06

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Page 20-The Michigan Daily/New Student Edition - Thursday, September 6, 1990
City undergoes
rr
construction in,,

summer

by Megan McKenna
Daily Staff Writer
Ahh... The sounds of spring; bird
chirping, crickets whirring, jack-
hammers pounding. Construction
sites sprang up this spring in Ann
Arbor like weeds on campus, leaving
big holes and orange fences for stu-
dents to ponder.
In April construction crews began
widening the sidewalks and corners
of South University Avenue. Round
tree planters, new lights, curbs and
drainage systems were installed,
along with new gutters.
The improvements "will make a
nicer environment for shopping,"
Andy Dryden, president of the South
University Merchants Association,
said.
Though merchants speculated
there would be more parking after
the renovations, Ruben Bergman co-
ordinator of the project for the
Downtown Development Authority
(DDA) said the amount of parking
spaces will remain the same. The
DDA is funding the $1,250,000 pro-
ject.
Construction along South Uni-
versity from E. University to
Washtenaw Avenue was expected to
be completed by the Krull Construc-
tion Company in time for the Ann
Arbor Art Fair in July, but wasn't
finished on schedule.
"They (Krull) never thought
they'd have the trees done by Art

'time
Fair, but they did think they'd have
have the paving done," said Nisee
Shawl, a member of the South U.
Merchants Association.
Not only was the paving not fin-
ished for Ann Arbor's annual cele-
bration, as promised, but Krull also
was forced to tear up one side of a
block when they learned the survey-
ing on the street was done incor-
rectly.
When Krull's supplier did not de
liver paving stones in time, cotn-
struction was further delayed.
Across campus, Krull was busy
replacing a 25-year-old underground
steam pipe next to Angell Hall. '
The pipe was filled with asbestos
and was replaced with a more durable
one, Rich Hoard of the company
said.
Another construction project stilt
underway is the expansion of Ingaljs
Mall - the area extending from the
steps of Rackham graduate school tg
the steps of the Hatcher Library.
The project -approved by t 9
University's Board of Regents in.
March 1982 - will replace the parks
ing lot next to the Natural Scienc4
building with bike racks, planter andt
new walkways.
A Stonerdesbrough Company
construction worker said '
"construction will be done when
school starts is September, and if
not then, a couple of weeks later."

One of the many construction site on campus this summer. Workers dug this hole to replace a steam tunnel pipe that contained asbestos. Also undergoing
renovation between May and August were the S. University and Main Street areas and the Ingalls Mall project.

Galleria to brighten face of S.

University,

provide entertainment in its three levels

Jennifer Armstrong
and Elizabeth Lenhard
NSE Contributors
The face of South University
Street is changing before our eyes.
Ann Arborites who have had to
search in several stores, and on sev-
eral different streets, to find what
they need, need search no longer.
The South University Galleria is
now open, and for most students, is
the closest thing to a mall within
walking distance.
The Galleria is a three level,
multi-venued, arcade style complex
with a vaulted glass ceiling and easy
access from the Church Street park-
ing ramp. Shopping, food, and all
finds of entertainment are available.
Mark Gale, the leasing represen-
tative for the Galleria, said, "I'm
very excited about the complex. It
will attract a diversity of people,
wvith wide interests." Seventy percent

of the space is leased; three shops are
open, and construction is underway
on several others.
The vaulted glass ceiling creates a
bright, airy shopping atmosphere.
The campus level, below ground,
will house a central commons area
including ten food court restaurants,
among them: The Cretan Cafe, a
Greek restaurant; Mattie D's, a bak-
ery; and Cafe Fino, a coffee shop
fashioned after the original Berkeley
shops of the sixties.
The Family Amusement Center,
also on the campus level, will be a
completely new concept in family
entertainment, said Gale. The center
will be an arcade, where winners earn
tickets that are redeemed for prizes.
It's a big leap from the "hangout"
atmosphere of the average video ar-
cade, he said.
The street level houses different
shops, includii the already open

Afterthoughts, an accessory shop;
Tracks, a music store; and the soon
to be open Northern Outpost and
SportsMania.
Perhaps the Galleria's most excit-
ing feature is on the upper level. "It
will be an entertainment complex,
although it is still in the conceptual
stages," said Gale. "It is planned to
be 13,000 square feet - almost the
entire upper level."
"It's completely unique to the
area, perhaps even Southeast Michi-
gan," Gale said. The complex will
include a hi.cnergy nightclub, pri-
marily for dancing, and a sports bar
with an emphasis on games. The bar
will offer basketball, up-scale bil-
liards, a batting cage, and several big
screen televisions for sports view-
ing.
Gale's purpose is to cater to the
largest number of people possible -
students, both undergraduates and

graduates, professionals, and fami-
lies. The result will be a new image
for the South University area, he
said.

i-

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