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October 08, 1990 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1990-10-08

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The Michigan Daily - Monday, October 8, 1990 - Page 5 .

Mich.

Representatives

0

split on death penalty

WASHINGTON (AP) - Michi-
gan representatives were sharply di-
vided on the death penalty and an as-
sault weapon ban as the House ap-
proved a wide-ranging crime bill.
They also voted on bills related to
immigration, and the Iraqi crisis.
The House voted 368-55 for the
bill, which toughens numerous
criminal laws, particularly those on
drug dealing. One' provision would
establish minimum penalties for sale
of drugs within 1,000 feet of a truck
stop or highway rest area.
The House rejected one death
penalty amendment and approved an-
other. Defeated 319-108 was a pro-
posal to add 12 offenses to the list of
those the bill would make punish-
able by death.
Opponents said the amendment
would open a loophole for defendants
by requiring that the prosecution
prove they intended to kill their vic-
tims in order to impose capital pun-
ishment. They said terrorists or gang
members who fire indiscriminately
into crowds or plant bombs could
claim they didn't mean to kill any-
one.
Supporters said without the
amendment defendants would have
new grounds for appeals that could
tie-up death cases in court.

Approved by a 271-159 vote was
an amendment to add the dozen addi-
tional offenses punishable by death
without the intent-to-kill provision.
Among the capital offenses it would
establish are killing by mail bomb-
ings and terrorist bombings . of
planes, trains, or automobiles.
The House also approved by a
vote of 295-133 an amendment to
impose the death penalty for drug
kingpins whose crimes result in
death after the kingpin showed reck-
less disregard for human life.
Approved by a 285-146 vote, the
House approved an amendment
which limits habeas corpus petitions
for death row inmates. The petitions
are used to raise constitutional chal-
lenges to the convictions. Critics
say they often are used frivolously to
delay execution.
The House permitted the contin-
ued manufacture of semi-automatic
assault weapons made with domesti-
cally produced parts after the 257-
172 vote. President Bush banned the
import of semi-automatic assault
weapons.
Supporters said police had pleaded
for a ban on the weapons, which
drug gangs often use against them.
Opponents said the ban would keep
the weapons out of the hands of law-

abiding citizens but not criminals.
The House approved by a 226-
204 vote an amendment which
would require the federal prison in-
dustry program to delay expanding
its production of certain products,
including furniture, until a market
study is performed.
Several Michigan representatives
co-sponsored the bill to stop unfair
competition between the prison;pro-
gram and private sector industries.

.r
,

JENNIFER DUUI*ITZJallY

ounging around"
J.C. Miller, an LSA sophomore, patiently waits for his friends to help him move his couch into his South Quad
room.

By a vote of 231-192, the House
approved a bill that would expand
the number of immigrants allowedl
into the country each year from
540,000 to 775,000. It would give,
priority to highly skilled workers
and natives of some European coun-
tries.
Supporters said the bill would
unite families of recent immigrants,.
promote ethnic diversity and boost.
the nation's pool of skilled workers.
Opponents said it would allow tood
many immigrants and deny jobs to, ,
Americans.
The Senate voted 96-3 for a reso'
lution of support for Presiden
Bush's handling of the Iraqi crisis.
Some supporters cautioned, hov=,-'
ever, that the resolution did not gi'e-
the administration a blank check to'
initiate hostilities without provoca-
tion.

EARTH
Continued from page 1
"There's more crime in the seats
Aan in the streets," Nader said. He
'ged the crowd to use its buying
power to influence big companies'
environmental policies.
Saturday's activities commenced
as the delegates marched across the
campus and sat on the grass as
SEAC leaders from U of I and other
universities worked the crowd into a
frenzy with cheers and speeches.
SEAC leaders took the opportunity
announce a "Declaration of Envi-
ronmental Independence."
"Today's students and young
people face a future in crisis," the
proclamation began, "and we will no
longer sell our birthright of a
healthy earth to corporate and politi-
cal leaders."
The day's events climaxed during
the afternoon as the students split up
into groups by region, to draft a
*atement on the region's top envi-
ronmental priorities.

The regional meeting for Michi-
gan, Indiana and Illinois was attended
by more than 200 campus leaders
from the tri-state area, who worked
together to identify the most imme-
diate and imposing environmental
problems on their campuses.
The regional assembly high-
lighted their top three priorities:
banning polystyrene styrofoam
products, pushing for increased use
of recycled and unbleached paper, and
working towards utilities conserva-
tion.
Assigned with the task of coordi-
nating the efforts and opinions of the
regional meeting, U of I sophomore
Jeremy Hays was pleased with the
results.
Hays, a member of Students for
Environmental Concerns and the co-
chair of the SEAC conference, said,
"with a regional conference, we
would be able to do a lot more effec-
tive networking and get a lot more
concrete work done."
Julliette Cherbuliez, LSA junior
and steering committee member of

the recently-formed ENACT-UM en-
vironmental group, agreed the re-
gional conference's efforts were not
as effective as they could have been
but said most of her accomplish-
ments have taken place outside of
the official sessions.
"The talking, the networking that
is going on outside of the meetings
is great," she said. "I've exchanged
addresses with schools in Michigan
I'd never heard of before."
Cherbuliez stressed the group has
an obligation to act on the experi-
ences of the CATALYST confer-
ence.
"We've got to follow up on the
priority policy, and we've got to fol-
low up with the communication be-
tween campuses. That's the only
way we're going to get anything
done," she said.
Students got an invigorating
wake-up call yesterday as the Rev-
erend Jesse Jackson urged students to
register to vote, and get involved in
the struggle for human rights, as
well as environmental rights.

THERE AETO1SIDS1T
BECOMING A NURSE IN THE ARMY.
And they're both repre-
sented by the insignia you wear
as a member of the Army Nurse
Corps. The caduceus on the left
means you're part of a health care
system in which educational and
career advancement are the rule,
not the exception. The gold bar
on the right means you command respect as an Army officer. If you're
earning a BSN, write: Army Nurse Opportunities, P.O. Box 7713,
Clifton, NJ 07015. Or call toll free 1-800-USA-ARMY.
ARMY NURSE CORPS. BE ALLYOU CAN BE.

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4

ART
Continued from page 1 until Dec. 2. Kendall said the works is located in the lobby of the Per-
The exhibit will be open from 2- by local artists will be changed formance Network building, 408 W.
6 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday throughout the months. The exhibit Washington.

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