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October 08, 1990 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1990-10-08

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Page 2 - The Michigan Daily - Monday, October 8, 1990

Calvin and Hobbes

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Baits II residents can read,
relax in new library facility

Calvin and Hobbes

by Garrick Wang
A new library opened in the Baits
II Residence Hall on North Campus
last month.
Joan Patterson, the head librarian,
said the library's primary purpose is
to "have the public library atmo-
sphere as a social/cultural meeting
place." Residents can enjoy the
quiet, easy-going atmosphere while
relaxing, doing homework, reading
the various newspapers and maga-
zines, or meeting new people.
"It's a place to take a break," said
Joe Long, a first-year physics gradu-
ate student. "I read the magazines and
listen to the good music."
"It's nice to come in and read the
magazines," said Henry Paillere, a
French graduate student. "You can
play chess and listen to the music
and unwind."
Patterson is arranging educational
programs for Baits residents. She has
established a workshop in conjunc-
tion with the Sexual Assault Preven-
tion and Awareness Center (SAPAC)

to discuss acquaintance rape. She
also plans to invite faculty members
to give lectures related to current
campus, health, and political issues.
To complement the educational
programming, Patterson plans to ar-
range entertainment programs such
as game tournaments and movie
nights.
"We're working to expand the
collection of all of our materials
with Baits residents',needs and inter-
ests in mind," Patterson said. "I
work from residents' suggestions in
the library to determine what we will
purchase."
The library's size and collection
are smaller than the other residence
hall libraries. Patterson said that the
other residence halls on campus were
designed with a library in mind, but
space was not set aside for one in
Baits.
Approximately 40 to 50 people
visit the library each night, Patter-
son said. She hopes attendance will
increase. The library advertises its

educational and entertaining pro-
grams in the resident newsletter Ver-
baitim.
The Baits library was opened be-
cause "residents expressed a need and
an interest in having their own li-
brary," said John Heidke, associate
director for residence education. The
Housing Department decided to open
the library to emphasize its belief
"in linking education in and out of
the classroom."
Heidke also said residents subsi-
dize the library through their room
and board. The library incurs most of
its expenses through increasing its
collection and paying its library as-
sistants.
Every residence hall except
Fletcher Hall has extensive libraries
which are run by a head librarian and
library assistants. Students can visit
any library, but residents can borrow
materials only from their own li-
braries.

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Nuts and Bolts
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UP.ITh$S WH4OL.E DAMN WORLD
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570 walk to combat hunger

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WHO?

by Judd Winick
A MAC TRCK? aSOU I'LL
PA MY ALIMONY ANP MY(
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by Beth Halverson
More than 570 people from local
organizations affiliated with the In-
terfaith Council for Peace and Justice
participated in the annual Washtenaw
County 10 kilometer Hunger Walk
yesterday afternoon along the streets
of Ann Arbor.
The walk, also known as CROP
Walk, serves as a fundraiser for the
Church World Service (CWS), a re-
lief, development, and refugee assis-
tance arm of the National Churches
of Christ in the United States. The
proceeds from yesterday's Hunger
Walk, expected to exceed $4,200,
will be divided among local and in-
ternational charities.
Local organizations receiving
aid include the Ann Arbor and Ypsi-
lanti Salvation Army, the Commu-
nity Action Network, St. John the
Baptist Church Food Cupboard, the

Second Baptist Church Human Ser-
vices Program, and the S.O.S.
Community Crisis Center. Overseas
funds are distributed through CWS
churches in Cambodia, Nambia, and
Panama.
CROP Walk Coordinator Donna
Ainsworth said participants are from
many different backgrounds. Often,
fellow church members sponsor the
walkers, she said.
Carol McCrae, a fifth-year walker
and member of Memorial Christian
Church, received $225 in pledges.
McCrae said the walk has changed
over the past few years. "I see less
students now and more families,"
she said.
Ann Munster, an Ann Arbor resi-
dent and 1969 University graduate,
finished the walk first. "I ran the
whole thing," she said excitedly.
Munster was impressed with CWS's

aid efforts because "they try to help
people become self-sufficient."
Munster's said the most interest-
ing part of the walk was the stop at
the Zen Buddhist temple. "Everyone
got to use the*bathroom - if we
agreed to take our shoes off," she
said.
Don Fitch, a first-year participant
in the walk, completed the walk in
an hour and 15 minutes. Fitch said
along the way, traffic waited for the
walkers and even tooted their horns *
for encouragement.
The walkers arrived at the finish
line and found a simple meal of soup
and bread awaiting them "to reflect
how the poor people of the world eat
every day," said Wendy Gage, a
worker at the walkers' check-in desk.
The walk started and finished at
the First Presbyterian Church on
Washtenaw.

I U

INTERESTED IN
ADVERTISING?
If you are looking forward to having a
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Execu ives work 5-8 hours Pick up an appi
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ications 8B

Washtenaw.

BERMAN
Continued from page 1
screaming man then had to be
dragged from the room, during
which time Berman recognized him
as the man from three years ago. "I
just tore him apart, and he stalked
me for three years," he said.
Berman remembers using humor
as a defense mechanism. "From 6th

grade through high school I was a
short little fat kid... my way to get
attention was by joking," Berman
said. "I realized how much I liked to
make people laugh... 1,500 people
is quite a rush."
For now, Peter Berman is living
the life of a comedian, traveling
around the country and performing.
Although it sounds like the glam-
orous life, Berman asserts, "It's a
Catch-22, it's great, but it stinks...

I'm living out of a suitcase."
Eric Kurit, committee chair of
Laugh Track, said, "He has a lot of
potential (and he) relates well to the
audience, he will definitely go
really big."
Tom Franck, current performer
and frequent host at Laugh Track,
agreed, "(Peter's) ability to be
bomb-proof (on stage), no matter
how bad the situation is (his
strength), he will always come
through."

y!
Idg

VOTE
Continued from page 1

planning to vote for the requirement
though she has "great doubts as to
whether current social issues should
ever be brought into the classroom."
While Scodel said racism is a se-

rious problem, she said any curricu-
lum which tells students how to
think and act is inappropriate. She
finds the proposed classes to be more
acceptable than last year's because
they attempt to make students think
more and the "more thoughtful you
are, the less racist you are."
History Prof. Terrence McDon-
ald, said he will vote for the faculty
proposal, which he co-authored. He
said the faculty proposal is the
strongest because it has the broadest
program. He also said it is designed
with a "mechanism for faculty initia-
tive in planning the courses and an
interactive relationship between the
faculty and the curriculum commit-
tee."

Although the professors were re-
luctant to make predictions about the
outcome of today's vote, McDonald
said "something will pass but I'm
not sure which one."
The fate of the proposal "depends
on how well attended the meeting
is," Scodel said. "The other meeting
was well attended with lots of en-
ergy. There is less interest now," she
said.
Dunn agreed that attendance at the
meeting as well as what is said will
be a deciding factor. He added that
the faculty are divided on this issue
as are many other groups of people
on campus. "There are many swing
votes. It will be very close either
way," he said.

TYLE

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