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April 20, 1990 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1990-04-20

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OPINION
Support Mapplethorpe

4

ARTS
A Ray of hope

9

SPORTS

12

'M' football ready for Spring Game

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411F d toan al
Ninety-nine years of editorial freedom
Vol. C, No. 135 Ann Arbor, Michigan - Friday, April 20, 1990 TMihigan i
Cuts may hit faculty salary
Projected low appropriations dim hopes for salary increase

by Christine Kloostra
and Noelle Vance
Daily Staff Reporters
There will be little money next
year in the University's budget to
devote to faculty salaries because of
expected low state appropriations,
said University President James
Duderstadt this week.
Next year is expected-to be "the
weakest salary year in many, many
years," Duderstadt said in an inter-
view Wednesday.
Duderstadt's prediction comes in
the face of senior faculty members'
pleas for the University to bridge the
disparity between the salaries of se-
nior professors and their associate
and assistant colleagues.
Senior University professors are
receiving comparably less pay than
associate and assistant professors,
and the difference is not likely to
improve as expected low state ap-
propriations will force the Univer-
sity to trim its budget next year.
"Senior faculty are falling behind
their peers," said Public Health Prof.
Roy Penchansky, at the University
Board of Regents meeting yesterday.
Penchansky is the chair of the
Committee on the Economic Status
of the Faculty.
Salaries of senior University
professors now rank thirteenth in the
nation compared to other schools,

and within University departments,
the difference in pay between profes-
sors of the same seniority level is
sometimes between $40,000 to
$50,000, Penchansky said.
Penchansky recommended the
University allocate an additional $1
million to its senior faculty salaries
every year for the next three years.
But University regents gave little
encouragement to Penchansky.
"This particular phenomenon has
been described by your predecessors
since I've been on the board," said
Regent Neal Nielsen (R-Brighton).
"Presumably other schools have the
same problem," he said.
Duderstadt added that the Univer-
sity must look to the state if it
wants to improve the salaries of fac-
ulty members.
"Within the public institutions
(the University's salary) ranks quite
high," said Regent Deane Baker (R-
Ann Arbor). "The solution lies
within ourselves in reallocation and
in (receiving) additional support
from the state," Baker said.
The University is expecting an
approximately 4.7 percent increase
from the state for fiscal year 1990-
91, approximately half the increase
it requested last fall.
Whereas the University requested
an $18.1 million increase in state
funds last fall, Governor Blanchard

has proposed an $11 million increase
in state allocations for the Univer-
sity and the state senate has proposed
an increase of $11.3 million, said
Provost and Vice President for Aca-
demic Affairs Charles Vest.
Final state appropriations will
not be known until this summer.
"We do not expect the final ap-
propriations to be dramatically dif-
ferent from the current recommenda-
tions (by the state and governor),"
said Vice President for Government
Relations Richard Kennedy.
If state appropriations fall as
short as University officials now
predict, the University will have to
make cuts, but Vest said he can not
predict where those cuts will be
made. The University has tentatively
budgeted increases of $5.3 million
'Senior faculty are
falling behind their
peers.... (professors)
here aren't being paid
what they're being
paid in other areas'
-Roy Penchansky
Public Health Prof.
for student financial aid and $13.2
million for faculty compensation.
Last December Duderstadt vowed

to keep tuition increases for in-state
undergraduate students at or below
6.5 percent, and said out-of-state and
graduate student tuition increases are
likely to remain between seven and
10 percent.
Though the University faces fi-
nancial constraints, Penchansky said
the University must consider the
consequences of low faculty salaries.
Penchansky's report stated that
competition with other universities
has forced the University to pay new
professors higher salaries than its
senior professors.
The disparity in pay lowers
morale and decreases senior profes-
sors' motivation, Penchansky said.
The low salaries for senior faculty
members cause many assistant and
associate professors to view the
University only as a stopping place
on their way to better paying jobs at
other universities, he added.
"(The University) is losing most
of their good associates to other
places because they see that the fulls
(professors) here aren't being paid
what they're being paid in other ar-
eas," he added.
According to Penchansky's re-
port, the University's average salary
for associate and assistant professors
is ranked sixth among its peer insti-
tutions, while full professors' pay
ranks only 13th.

Clapping for freedom
First-year medical student Myles Spar claps at the Diag rally to gain
support for the freedom of Soviet Jews. Jews in the U.S.S.R. face a call
for their massacre on May 5 by the ultra-nationalist party Pamyat.

Minority
by Mark Katz
Daily Minority Issues Reporter

enrollment differs

among schools

More than five times as many Blacks enrolled in the
School of Physical Education than in the School of
Natural Resources last Fall, according to reports com-
piled by the Office of Affirmative Action.
The reports underscore significant disparities in mi-
nority enrollment among individual schools and col-
leges at the University.
Enrollment in the school of Business Administration
and other schools has increased since the fall of 1986,
while it has stagnated in others, reports state.
"We can't get very many applications (from
Blacks)," said John Bassett, School of Natural Re-
sources associate dean. "I suspect there hasn't been a
clever enough effort to try and reach them."
The most recent statistics (fall 1989) show that
Black enrollment varied from a high of 11.8 percent in
the school of Physical Education to a low of 2.1 percent
in the School of Natural Resources.
However, University President James Duderstadt at-
tributed the low minority enrollment in Natural Re-
sources to the low-paying careers that graduates from
the school pursue.
Asian enrollment is the greatest in the College of
Pharmacy, at 8.5 percent, while at the School of Educa-
tion the percentage of Asians stands at only 1.6 percent,
one of the lowest among all schools. Percentages in-

elude graduate and undergraduate enrollment if applica-
ble.
Overall University enrollment stands at 6.5 percent
for Blacks, 6.8 percent for Asians, 2.8 percent for His-
panics, and 0.4 percent for Native Americans.
While to a certain extent people are making practical
choices in what schools to attend, "that doesn't have to
be the case," said Barbara Ransby, a graduate student in
history and a member of the United Coalition Against
Racism.
"I think it's incumbent upon the schools and col-
leges to make their programs more attractive and acces-
sible to those sectors of students who have been histori-
cally underrepresented in those disciplines."
The school of Public Health has one of the highest
enrollments of minority students. Blacks, Asians, and
Hispanics comprise 10.5 percent, 7.7 percent, and 3.0
percent, respectively, in the school. However, there are
no Native American students in the school.
Rajal Patel, a graduate student in the School of Pub-
lic Health, said one of the main reasons many people of
color apply to schools such as Public Health is because
these fields offer opportunities for students to help their
communities. Nevertheless, "there are some schools
that are doing more active recruiting than other
schools," said Patel, who is taking a break from the
University's medical school after two years.
See SCHOOLS, page 2

Minority
enrollment
by school
Graduate and
undergraduate

Dentistry
Black
Asian
Amer. Ind.
Hispanic
Education
Black
Asian
Amer. Ind.

9.5
6.7;
.2
1.4
7.9
1.6
.6

493
47
33
1
7
444
35
'7
3

*Law
Black
Asian
Amer. Ind.
Hispanic
LSA
Black
Asian
Amer. End.

1175
7.5 88
2.2 26
.7 8
4.1 49
17996
6.0 1086
6.9 1246
.4 75

Nursing
Black
Asian
Amer. Ind.
Hispanic
Pharmacy
Black
Asian
Amer. Ind.

4.2
3.5
.4
6
4.9
8.5
0

717
30
25
3
247
12
2Z1
0

School/group % Number Hispanic Z.3 10 Hispanic 2.9 5Z4 Hispanic 3.2ZL
Architecture 473 Engineering 5944 *Medicine 1789 Phys. Ed. 466
Black 3.4 16 Black 4.1 248 Black 5.9 105 Black 11.8 55
Asian 4.2 20 Asian 8.0 476 Asian 8.0 143 Asian 1.9 9
Amer. nd. 2 1 Amer. Ind .3 15 Amer. Ind. .5 9 Amer. Ind. 0 0
Hispanic 1.7 8 Hispanic 2.1 124 Hispanic 2.2 40 Hispanic 1.7 8
Art 593 *Graduate 595 Music 777 *Pub. Health 753
Black 3.7 22 Black 4.5 27 Black 5.9 46 Black 10.5 49
Asian 5.7 34 Asian 2.9 17 Asian 4.1 32 Asian 7.7 36
Amer. Ind. 1.0 6 Amer. Ind. .5 3 Amer. Ind. .5 4 Amer. Ind. 0 0
Hispanic 1.0 6 Hispanic 3.7 22 Hispanic 1.9 15 Hispanic 3.0 14

Bus. Ad.
Black
Asian
Amer. Ind
Hispanic

2504
7.7 193
3.7 92
2,6 2
2.6 65

Info/Lib. St
Black
Asian
Amer. Ind.
Hispanic.

4.5
.7
23
>2.4

290
13
2
1
7.

Nat. Res.
Black
Asian
Amer. Ind.
Hispanic

2.1
3.8
.6
1.4

479
10
18
3
7,

*Soc. Work
Black 9.6.
Asian 2.0
Amer. Ind. .7.
Hispanic 1.5:

603
58
12
4
9

* denotes graduate-only schools

Group
demands T
attention C
or AIDS
by Amy Quick 6

Regent says 'U'
should prevent
annual Hash Bash

Approximately 35 members of
the AIDS Coalition to Unleash
Power (ACT UP) rallied in front of
the Ann Arbor City Hall yesterday
and marched to the University hospi-
tal to demonstrate their commitment
to fighting AIDS.
"We are here to shatter the denial
of the existence of AIDS in this
area," said ACT UP member Mark
Weinstein.
ACT UP is a national group
aimed at ending the AIDS epidemic
through direct action. Its Ann Arbor
chapter formed three weeks ago when

by Noelle Vance
Daily Administration Reporter
The University should do every-
thing it can to prevent the annual
Hash Bash - an event at which
hundreds of people gather to smoke
marijuana - from occurring next
year, said Regent Deane Baker (R-
Ann Arbor) at yesterday's Board of
Regents meeting.
"We ought to be setting an ex-
ample within the University," Baker
said. He added that the University
should take efforts to prevent the use
of marijuana on campus.
The University revoked the per-
mit granted to the National Organi-

pus, adding that state officials should
be encouraged to speak against the
Hash Bash.
"We have to look at the broader
end," Baker said. "What, if anything,
should University rules be (regarding
drug use)," he said.
If charged with using marijuana
in Ann Arbor, students must pay a
$25 fine to the city, but do not face
University sanctions.
Duderstadt said the University is
mandated by the Federal government
to develop a policy regarding alcohol
and substance abuse. A task force is
currently working on the policy.
T%__ _ fs p tr .

1 j

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