100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 13, 1990 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1990-04-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 8 - The Michigan Daily - Friday, April 13, 1990

VAUGHN
Continued from page 5
Eric Clapton have never had much
trouble getting airtime on the dis-
gustingly segregated radio stations in
this country.
In 1985, keyboardist Reese
Wynans joined drummer Chris Lay-
ton and Vaughn's long-time bassist
Tommy Shannon in Double Trou-
ble. The addition of Wynans helped
flesh out the band's sound, freeing
Vaughn from carrying the melody
with his guitar alone, and allowing
the band to play more songs on the
rhythm side of the R&B genre.
Again, this was most noticeable
live, on bouncier tunes such as
"Mary Had a Little Lamb" and "Love
Struck Baby" (yes, I like that song a
lot).
To say Vaughn was influenced by
Jimi Hendrix is quite an understate-
ment. SRV & Double Trouble have
recorded several songs either written
or covered by Hendrix, and Vaughn
can safely be said to have mastered
Jimi's unorthodox southpaw sound.
Vaughn once owned one of the Seat-
tle guitar god's wah-wah pedals, un-
til someone with no sense of history
(or perhaps an all too good knowl-
edge of history) stole it. One aspect
of Hendrix's life Vaughn will not be
emulating is Jimi's unfortunate tran-
quilizer overdose. Vaughn has kicked
a drug addiction that hospitalized
him a few years ago; hopefully this
will allow him to play throughout
the '90s.
During the '80s Vaughn has re-
mained quite popular locally. An ap-
pearance at Hill Auditorium included
a jam with opening act Johnny
Copeland, and Ted Nugent jumped
onstage one night during an impres-
sive run of shows at the Royal Oak
Music Theater, which also included a
rare cover of "Little Wing." With
lefty Ernie Isley (the youngest Isley
Brother, who can still recall seeing
Jimi play in his bedroom a long
time ago) opening and Lonnie
Brooks in town, one never knows

I

Gregson and

Collister play rock,

OK?

by Mark Swartz
FOR Clive Gregson, "folk" is a four-letter word. Gregson, the
strumming-and-picking half of the duo Gregson and Collister, promises an
evening of pure rock 'n' roll satisfaction at The Ark Saturday night.
Diminuitive Christine Collister, the other half, sings.
The misconception that Gregson and Collister play folk music is an
easy one to make. They did play at last year's Ann Arbor Folk Festival.
They do harmonize like a latter-day Peter, Paul and Mary. And Gregson
does, after all, brandish an acoustic guitar onstage. "As soon as you pick
up an acoustic guitar, people say, 'Oh, it's folk music!'" he acknowledges.
But this is rock 'n' roll, not folk. Really.
Listening to Gregson and Collister's latest album, A Change in the
Weather, it is apparent that the British duo is striving to plug into
American rock 'n' roll traditions. One track, "(Don't step in) My Blue
.Suede Shoes," sets up an imaginary dialogue between Elvis Presley and
Bruce Springsteen. "How I wish that I had listened/ When I heard someone
say/ Don't step in my blue suede shoes/ Or everything you have now/ You
will surely lose," laments a despairing Boss after the press has torn his
privacy to shreds.
"It's about the way in which the media attacks stardom," Gregson
explains. Instead of an exploitative "tribute" h la Mojo Nixon and Skid
Roper's "Elvis is Everywhere," "(Don't step in) My Blue Suede Shoes," is
a sympathetic, non-ironic analysis of the star machinery that eventually
killed the King.
"I became a Presley fan in the last four or five years," says Gregson,
recalling the magic moment when a friend gave him a boxed set of Elvis'
Sun years. Change in the Weather also contains "Tryin' to Get to You," a
cover of a song from his first release.
Besides The King and The Boss, Gregson has a special place in his
heart for the slightly lesser-known Richard Thompson. Gregson, an alum
of the Thompson sessions that produced such classics as Shoot out the
Lights and Across a Crowded Room, calls Thompson "the best songwriter
ever to come out of the British Isles."
Still, he is quick to remove himself from Thompson's - gasp! - folk
tendencies. "We're much more rock and roll, more mainstream," he asserts.
Okay, okay, we get the picture.
CLIVE GREGSON AND CHRISTINE COLLISTER play at The Ark, 637
1/2 S. Main, this Saturday at 7:30 and 10 p.m. Tickets are $9.75, at the
Union, Schoolkids and Herb David.

They've been spotted in some folky joints but Clive Gregson and Christine Collister maintain that it's only rock
'n' roll and they like it.

how hot it might get inside the
Michigan Theater.

STE VIE RAY VAUGHN & DOUBLE
TROUBLE appear at the Michigan
Theater tonight and tomorrow at 8
p.m. At press time a few tickets
were available for the Saturday
show; they cost $22.50.

T-SHIRT PRINTERY
" QUALITY GARMENT PRINTING AT REASONABLE PRICES
ONE WEEK DELIVERY ON MOST ORDERS
" OUR ARTISTS WORK WITH YOU TO PRODUCE SHIRTS YOU CAN BE PROUD OF
" COMPLETE LINES OF 100% COTTON & 50/50 QUALITY WEARABLES

Beausoleil
Live! From the Left Coast
Rounder Records
Accordions, banjos, and fiddles.
"The kids they dance and shake their
bones." Bill says Beausoleil would
be good to hear after meeting Mr.
Owsley.
This live album from the in-
tensely decorated Great American
Music Hall in San Francisco cooks,
jams, rocks, and flat-out makes your
feet move if you have functioning
ears and are human. An excellent
way to practice your toe tapping be-
fore their show at the Ark on Sun-
day. -Brian Jarvinen

Mol Triffid
"I Wanna See Pretty People
Doin' Ugly Things"/"Deen
Neeb's Metal Effort"
Casting Couch Records
With the suggestion "For best re-
sults, play this thing loud" written
on the cover, Ann Arbor's own M61
Triffid has released their long-delayed
seven-inch record. It contains the ar-
dent fan's old favorites, "I Wanna
See Pretty People Doin' Ugly
Things" and "Deen Neeb's Metal Ef-
fort," and sports a visual of the
"Triffid" on the front cover. Both
tracks are reminiscient of the band's

semi-proclaimed mentors, Metallica.
Static-like dissonance preludes
"Pretty People" as it erupts into the
clamor of sexual tension incited by
sadomasochism. The voice of singer
Kurt Serbus conveys the urgency of
the lyrics as he explains, "You can
keep your lace baby/'cause leather's
got more sting... ugly dreams fill
my inner being/ a girl with flesh as
white as cream and hair as black and
eyes as blue/ as the bruises left when
love is through." The lyrics to this
song are honest, painful and pretty
great, forcing one'to sit and ponder
them when the song concludes.
"Deen Neeb's," a seeming dis-
course between a militant superior
and a subservient follower, is less
lyrically potent. Dave Sahijdak lays

down the bassline while John West-
erman pounds furiously on the-
skins; Kimo Ball unleashes himself-'
fingering relentlessly at the guitar.
The forefront of the song is rather
repetitive while undertoned by the
guitar, but they use this to depict the
society they are mocking, one in
which "Cat Stevens even sold'
Rushdie," and the cries of those i
power are "...rising silent to the
peon god they made."
"Pretty People" and "Deen'
Neeb's" are effective social commen-
taries. Moreover, they are good to
thrash around to amidst a rage about
societal inequalities or, for that mat-
ter, because your cat stole your pot.
-Kim Yaged

eWE FEA TURE THE
HANES BEEFY - T

994-1367
1002 PONTIAC TRAIL ANN ARBOR

eMINIMUM ORDER
12 SHIRTS

FASHION SALE!
25% OFF
OUR ENTIRE STOCK OF
$ SEPARATE KNIT TOPS
& FABRIC BOTTOMS!
JUNIOR TOPS

dm

- .-

Ballroom Dance

with a live big band
Saturday, April 14 8pm -12am
in the Pendleton Room of the Michigan Union
$11/couple, $7/single attire: 'semi-semi-formal' Sponsored by MSA
(ladies-skirt/dress; men-jacket)

I; MOVE-UI.
I ~.Michigan's most reputable student service...
I ; since 1982'
" We ship to New York and New Jersey "
" We store in Ann Arbor "-
Call Lance, 663-8522
BRING THIS AD WITH PURCHASE & RECEIVE DISCOUNT

1-..

I

1 - 'iJJi iJ

r

Ricki Tank Tops
SALE 5.99-7.99

One Step
SALE

Up Crop Tanks
5.99

Erika One-Pocket Tee's
SALE 7.99-8.49
Ricki Crested Mock Tee's
SALE 11.99-13.99
Erika Henley Tee's
SALE 9.99

HOLY WEEK SERVICES
FRIDAY, 4/13- Tenebrae Service, 7:30 p.m.
SATURDAY, 4/14- Easter Vigil, 11:00 p.m.
SUNDAY, 4/15- Easter Celebration, 10:30 a.m.
University Lutheran Chapel
1511 Washtenaw 663-6860

0

Who's Who Neon
SALE 8:99

Tee's

JUNIOR BOTTOMS

Erika Knit Leggings
SALE 11.99
Palmettos Bottoms
SALE 18.99
Michael GKnits
SALE 19.99
Transport Printed Twills
SALE 21.99
Shown:
Erika Striped Cardigan-Sale 13.99
Michael G Pant-Sale 19.99

B O S T O N
U NI V E R S I T Y
SUMMER TERM
Discover all we have to offer this summer at Boston University.
Looking for an academic challenge? We have a world class faculty
teaching over 425 stimulating undergraduate and graduate classes
this summer. Enroll in up to 16 credit hours during our two summer
sessions: Session I (May 22-June 30), and Session II (July 3-
August 11). Need a summer job? Start your search with companies
who have indicated a desire to hire Boston University summer stu-
dents ... companies located close to campus and listed in our Guide
to Summer Jobs. Want to explore one of America's most dynamic
cities? Boston's attractions run the gamut from free concerts to
harbor cruises, from cozy havens for book browsers to ice cream par-
lors, from Fenway Park to the Museum of Fine Arts - and they are
all described in our Summer in the City Guide. Enjoy an exciting and

Order your college ring NOW.
Stop by and see a Jostens representative,
Monday, April 9 thru Friday, April 13,
11:00a.m. to 4:00p.m.,

01

Hurry for best selection!

1

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan