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April 06, 1990 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1990-04-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I, Anatolia
portrays
women of
many eras
by Jay Pekala
IT may seem unlikely that an epic
drama that chronicles 3,000 years
of Turkish history can be per-
formed by only one person, but na-
tive actor Yildiz Kenter does just
that, with the help of playwright
Gung6r Dilmen. Organized by the
University of Michigan Turkish
Students Association, Kenter will
perform the internationally ac-
claimed I, Anatolia for one night
this Sunday at Rackham.
Dilmen's play presents 16
women from the various civiliza-
tions that have mythically and ac-
tually controlled Asia Minor. The
list features the domineering
Byzantine empress Theodora (who
single-handedly saved the Byzantine
throne while also carrying out
many reforms for women) and
Halide Edip, the 20th-century nov-
elist, feminist and political activist
who played a vital role in the Turk-
ish War of Independence (1919-
1922). Fictional females range
from Cybele (the mother goddess
of Anatolia and symbol of fertility)
to Andromache, the legendary wife
of Hector who inspired her husband
to defend Troy against the Greeks
in the Trojan War and lost her
young son to the brutal invaders.

Nyah, nyah, fly
Cry-Ba by
dir. John Waters
by Wendy Shanker
If I could find one fault with the new John Waters
film, Cry-Baby, I'd say I laughed so hard at some
points that I couldn't hear what the actors said next.
This movie takes everything that we thought was so
important in high school, like: Am I hanging out with
the right people? Will I ever find a significant other?
Are my boobs big enough? (Well, okay, maybe the
guys didn't worry about their boobs.) Cry-Baby blows
these questions up in bursts of song, dance and colorful
characters.
It's great to see a movie that doesn't take itself too
seriously. Teen dreamboat Johnny Depp, who plays the
rockin', rebellin' title character, lets loose and doesn't
even care which way his swoosh of hair falls on his
forehead. Every event, every character in Cry-Baby goes
one step past reality into a land of movie fantasy.
In 1954 Baltimore only two types of kids ruled the
school: the Drapes and the Squares. As one Square
grandma (Polly Bergen) explains it, the Drapes, like
Cry-Baby, are juvenile deliquents: "Boys with long hair
and tatoos who spit on sight and girls in tight slacks -
hysterectomy pants, I call them."
Allison Vernon-Williams (Amy Locane) is a Square
with a steady, but that doesn't stop Cry-Baby's hanker-
ing for an Allison love-muffin. Though she's Square on
the outside - ponytails, prom dresses and beaucoup de

The Michigan Daily - Friday, April 6, 1990 - Page 9
ah nyah nyah
manners - Allison is pure Drape on the inside. Her
search for lust, love and excitment with the coolest (and
most emotional) guy in the school takes the audience
on a short but sweet music-filled adventure.
Cry-Baby features the ultimate melting pot of sup-
porting casts. Look for Ricki Lake (hairspray) as Cry-
Baby's pregnant sister. Traci Lords (name the porn
movie), Iggy Pop, Patty Hearst (yes, the one who got
kidnapped and went psycho), Susan Tyrell, and Willem
Dafoe, in an awesome cameo as a sadistic prison guard,
turn in the coolest performances. The absence of the late
Divine, a favorite Waters actor who portrayed both a
man and a woman in hairspray, leaves a piece missing
from the puzzle.
Just because a movie explodes with humor, how-
ever, doesn't means it's devoid of social commentary.
Waters pokes fun at the prison system the social elite in
Baltimore and the early twinges of the end of segrega-
tion. But Cry-Baby explores and revels in the joy of
youth and shows that you are too old to be a rebel.
When Cry-Baby is jailed for juvenile deliquency, he
sings, "I'm guilty 'til I'm twenty-one/ I guess doing
time for being young."
"I'm so tired of being good," Allison expresses pas
sionately to anyone who will listen. In Cry-Baby,
there's no good and no bad, only "hep," "cool," "drape"
and "square." Music matters most, manners matter least,
and love and good times make the grade.

Yildiz Kenter is not one woman, but many in her one-person show /,
Anatolia, presented this weekend by the Turkish Student Association.

Kenter presents the different
women through only minimal cos-
tume changes, relying on her own
renowned abilities to transform
herself.
Kenter has traveled the world
with her one-woman show, per-
forming in both the original Turk-
ish as well as an English transla-
tion by Talat Halman. London au-
diences greeted her with standing
ovations and packed houses. In The
Soviet Union, Panorama reported,
"Kenter has an unbelievable flexi-
bility. She can become as light as
a feather and exalted in one instant,
and then as hard as stone and mon-
umental in another. She is able to
transform herself easily from a very
old and worn out woman into a
very young and naive girl."
Kenter has appeared in both
classical and modern plays
throughout the United States, Eu-
rope, the U.S.S.R. and Turkey.

The 61-year-old actor has also di-
rected more than 100 plays, includ-
ing works by Shakespeare, Brecht,
Chekhov and Tennessee Williams.
She says she enjoys portraying
strong-willed women. Although
she says she not a feminist, she is
a firm believer that women should
be accorded the same rights as men
and participate in economic life.
In addition to the performance
on Sunday evening, Kenter will
join a panel discussion on Turkish
drama and women in Turkish his-
tory at 3 pm. Monday in the
Michigan League. Sociology pro-
fessor Fatma Muge Gocek will
moderate.
I, ANATOLIA will be performed
this Sunday at 7 p.m. at Rackham
Auditorium. Tickets for the show,
$4 for University students and $8
general admission, are available
at the Union.

RECORDS
Continued from page 8
over Rooftops.
For one thing, the band has
discovered rhythm. Although this
cannnot even remotely be considered
dance music, The Blue Nile have a
tempo all their own. The drum
machine is used as sparsely as
possible, as the songs seem to
propel themselves along as if they
were floating. Sure there are two
ballads (in a relative sense) here, but
they're better than those on Roof-
DIRTY
Continued from page 8
THE DIRTY DOZEN BRASS
BAND plays tomorrow at 8 and 11
p.m. at the Blind Pig. Tickets are
$12.50 in advance, available at
the Union.
ifml"91"

tops. "Seven A.M." even features a
funky (again in a relative sense)
synth bassline.
Buchanan's singing has also
improved. Whereas before he seemed
to ooze melancholy, he expands his
emotional range here, covering joy,
despair and even anger. He has an
unusual voice, but it fits perfectly
into the Blue Nile sound. It's as if
he approached the microphone in a
fit of emotion rather than worrying
about being perfectly on key.
The best song is "Headlights on

the Parade," a great tune that floats
along on a percussive piano riff and
features the full impact of Buch-
anan's alternating passive and reck-
less voice. Another gem is "The
Downtown Lights," which has
Buchanan in his most charged mood
yet. Hats is a short record - its
seven songs add up to less than forty
minutes - but hey, quality over
quantity. Hopefully, the next Blue
Nile record won't take another five
years.
-Mike Molitor

With Cry-Baby, John Waters proves he hasn't lost his affinity for the joyful underbelly of American life. The film's
heroes are the Drapes, the scummiest high school students this side of Division street.

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