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March 30, 1990 - Image 13

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1990-03-30

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, March 30, 1990 - Page 13

PENN STATE
Continued from page 1
ty, but we haven't even added an
eleventh school yet," Purdue Faculty
Representative Phil Nelson said.
"There's really no point in searching
for a twelfth school when you are
4*not set on 11." Al
Penn State, which some th'ought
would want to continue its series
against state-rival Pittsburgh, would
not take an active role in the pro-
cedure of adding a twelfth school. "I
think it would be presumptuous of
us to come into the Big Ten and try
to run things," Thalman said.
No matter how the Penn State-
*Big Ten situation is resolved, the
idea of conference expansion and
realignment has been firmly en-
trenched nationwide. Rumors of po-
tential megaconferences in basketball
and conference-hopping in general
have emerged.
Many speculate the Southeastern
Conference may steal Texas and
Texas A&M from the Southwest
Conference and get football indepen-
;dents Miami (Fla.) and Florida State.
Similar speculation would have Mi-
ami and Florida State forming their
own conference.
Along similar lines, if Penn
State is not admitted into the Big
Ten, it will continue its search for
an all-sports conference, said Paul
tters, Penn State's director of fiscal
and personnel planning for athletic

administration.
The most mind-boggling of all
rumored megaconferences concerns a
merging of the Big Ten, the Pacific-
10, the Big East, and the Atlantic
Coast Conferences for basketball.
Those four conferences contained 22
of the 64 NCAA men's tournament
teams, including 10 of the top 16
seeds.
Officials from the Pacific-10, the
Big East, the Big Ten, and the ACC
were all unavailable for comment.
But certain athletic department per-
sonnel within the Big Ten are not
keen on the issue.
"The rumor of the megaconfer-
ence frightens me," Iowa Associate
Athletic Director ChristinesGrant
said. "It will lead to a huge separa-
tion of the have and have-nots. I
would much rather stay with the
smaller conferences and stay within
sight of each other."
The whole idea of megaconfer-
ences is being fueled by television,
and thus by money, said Duderstadt.
So it would seemingly be to Penn
State's advantage to become a con-
ference member in the near future. "I
think it will become increasingly
difficult to work as an independent in
college athletics," Thalman said.
However, at least for the time
being, Penn State will have to grap-
ple with that difficulty.

MEGACONFERENS:
En ging
Rutgers Syracuse, or n brm
PAC-1O Pittsburgh may join
the B Tn Syracuse
.0
BgEast
:Xi:i: Rutgers
.Pittsburgh
Texas and Texas A&M, cu rently
" in theJS'oiihwestConference,
may migrate to the Southeastern
Conference,(SEC).
The Big Ten, Texas A&M
PAC-10, Big East, es A Florida State
and ACC are Texas
talking of
merging into a Miami and Florida State *Miami
basketball could join the SEC or form
megaconference. their own conference.

Senate
deni es
aid to
minlers
WASHINGTON (AP) - The
Senate, by a razor-thin margin,
turned back pleas for special aid to
local miners yesterday, rejecting a
measure Senate leaders and the White
House said could have jeopardized
broader clean air legislation.
The $500 million assistance
amendment was voted down 50 to 49
after five hours of debate during
which supporters argued the miners
needed help because they would be
adversely affected by tougher air
pollution controls.
The measure was seen as the
biggest remaining obstacle to
passage of major air pollution
control legislation that is scheduled
for a final vote next Tuesday. A
similar bill is pending in a House
committee.
The government has estimated
more than 5,000 miners of high-
sulfur coal are likely to lose their
jobs as Midwest utilities switch t9
other fuels to meet new pollution
requirements in the coming years.
The narrow vote was a victory for
Senate leaders of both parties
George Mitchell (D-Maine) and Bob
Dole (R-Kansas) - as well as the
Bush administration which had
opposed the assistance proposal as
too expensive and discriminatory
against other workers.
The White House had threatened
to withdraw support from any bill
that exceeded the current estimate.j
$21 billion-a-year cost.

BAM
Continued from Page 1
very much linked to BAM I because
we felt the grievances demanded by
students in 1970 had not been dealt
with," said graduate student Barbara
Ransby, a founding member of the
United Coalition Against Racism
(UCAR), a multi-racial group which
played a leading role in BAM III.

Ransby said although an Office
of Minority Affairs was established
as a result of BAM III and
"incremental progress" has been
made since then, "the University, as
a whole, has a long way to go."
"The central issue in 1970 and of
1990 is one of access," Ransby said.
"The question is in what ways is the
University going to fundamentally

change itself to make it accessible to
students of color."
BAM I demanded 10 percent
Black enrollment by the 1973-1974
school year, which would match the
percentage of Blacks statewide. Black
enrollment at the University peaked
1976 at 7.7 percent. Since then, it
dropped to a low of 4.9 percent in
1983 and now stands at 6.5 percent.

1,

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VCZ&Oa1 Touch....

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See news happen?
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Personals

764-0557
Read Gotta Love It Daily Sports
Celeirate Rpril [0oolS Ua3
wit h
sona tano, the CLown
(alias Rev. Floyd Shaffer)
at
CampuS Chapell
1236 Washtenaw Ct.
(One block south of CCl8B/ Geddes and Washtenaw}
668-7421/662.2402
Parking in the UM Church Street parking lot.
un daqj, April 1
10:00 a.m. Worship:
"Clowns and Other Fools for Christ's Sake"
speaker Rev. Floyd Shaffer,
12 noon - 3:00 p.m.
a urazlj IJnah
followed y an afternoon of intentional foolilhnell
6:00 p.m.
Clown service featuring Socataco, the clown
GARY BURTON
REUNION
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